Academics

Faculty & Staff

photo of Felicia Wilczenski

Felicia L Wilczenski , EdD

  • Associate Dean, College of Education and Human Development and School for Global Inclusion and Social Development Professor
  • Telephone: 617-287-7592

Areas of Expertise

Inclusive education, universal design for learning, service learning, transition from school to work for people with disabilities

Degrees

EdD, Education, University of Massachusetts Amherst
MS, Educational Psychology, University of Massachusetts Amherst
CAES, School Psychology, Boston College
EdM, School Counseling, Boston University
BS, Education/Psychology, Boston University

Professional Publications & Contributions

Additional Information

Felicia L. Wilczenski’s scholarly and teaching interests focus on inclusive education in global contexts. In 2011, she was a Fulbright Specialist at Beijing Normal University, promoting inclusive educational strategies such as universal design for learning and service-learning applications in higher education and in K-12 settings. She has conducted comparative inclusive education studies in China, Japan, and South Korea, and in 2014 completed a study tour in Poland in collaboration with the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Professor Wilczenski is the author of a nationally award winning book, A Practical Guide to Service Learning: Strategies for Positive Development in Schools, for which she was named 2008 John Glenn Scholar in Service Learning by the John Glenn School of Public Affairs at the Ohio State University. In 2000, she received the Mary Tucker Thorp Award for Distinguished Scholarship from the School of Social Work and Feinstein School of Education and Human Development at Rhode Island College.

Most recently, Professor Wilczenski has been studying the impact of service learning as a strategy to enhance school-to-work transitions and inclusion for students with disabilities. She is the principal investigator of the Inclusive Concurrent Enrollment partnership grant enrolling students with intellectual disabilities in courses at UMass Boston.