Faculty & Staff

David S. Areford, PhD

Associate Professor of Art, College of Liberal Arts

Contact

photo of David Areford

Areas of Expertise

Devotional art of the late Middle Ages and Northern Renaissance; early printmaking in Europe; twentieth-century printmaking, especially the prints of Sol LeWitt

Degrees

Ph.D., Art History, Northwestern University, 2001
M.A., Art History, Florida State University, 1995
B.A., English, Longwood College, 1985

Professional Publications & Contributions

Additional Information

David S. Areford is a specialist in late-medieval European devotional art, especially early printmaking. More recently, he has extended his interest in the history of printmaking to include twentieth-century America, specifically the prints of Sol LeWitt. He has published books, book chapters, and journal articles on fifteenth-century woodcuts and metalcuts, as well as manuscript illumination and panel painting. His book The Viewer and the Printed Image in Late Medieval Europe  received honorable mention from the International Fine Print Dealers Association Book Awards in 2011; and his co-authored exhibition catalog Origins of European Printmaking: Fifteenth-Century Woodcuts and Their Public was a finalist for the Alfred H. Barr, Jr. Award for Museum Scholarship in 2007. His exhibition catalog The Art of Empathy: The Mother of Sorrows in Northern Renaissance Art and Devotion was partly funded through a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts ("Art Works" program) in 2013.

Professor Areford's current research and curatorial projects include "Strict Beauty: Sol LeWitt Prints," an exhibition and catalog; "Locating LeWitt: Between the Mind and the Body," an edited collection of essays by various LeWitt scholars; and several articles exploring varied topics -- Sol LeWitt's printmaking, fifteenth-century woodcuts of the Christ Child, and the Maulbronn Altarpiece of 1432.

Professor Areford's fellowships and awards include a Fulbright Fellowship for research in Germany (1998-1999), a Post-Doctoral Curatorial Fellowship at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC (2001-2002), and the Newberry Library's Weiss/Brown Publication Subvention Award (2001). In 2009, he was elected to the Board of Directors (3-year term) of the International Center of Medieval Art.

Courses Taught

Art 101: Ancient and Medieval Art
Art 207L: Queer Visual Culture
Art 305: Early Medieval Art
Art 306: Romanesque and Gothic Art
Art 309: Northern Renaissance Art