Academics

Faculty & Staff

photo of Judith Zeitlin

Judith Zeitlin, PhD

  • Department Chair, Professor of Anthropology, College of Liberal Arts
  • Telephone: 617-287-6836
  • Office Location: McCormack Hall,04,00428

Areas of Expertise

Archaeology - Prehistoric and historical archaeology, ethnohistory, complex societies, New World colonialism. Geographical area: Mesoamerica, Andean South America.

Degrees

Phd Yale

Additional Information

Archaeology - Prehistoric and historical archaeology, ethnohistory, complex societies, New World colonialism. Geographical area: Mesoamerica, Andean South America.

Professor Judith Francis Zeitlin (Yale University PhD) is an archaeologist and ethnohistorian whose research centers primarily on the contact and colonial period native societies of Latin America, where she is especially interested in the dynamics of cultural change and persistence. Archaeological field work in Mesoamerica, including Oaxaca, the Isthmus of Tehuantepec, and Belize, has been complemented by archival research in Mexico and Spain. Her recent scholarly works include a new book, Cultural Politics in Colonial Tehuantepec: Community and State Among the Isthmus Zapotec, 1500-1750 (Stanford University Press, 2005), “Recordando a los reyes: El lienzo de Guevea y el discurso histórico de la época colonial,” in Escritura zapoteca (edited by Angeles Romero, CIESAS/INAH, 2003), and “The Paleoindian and Archaic Cultures of Mesoamerica” (co-authored with Robert N. Zeitlin) for the Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas (2000). She co-edited (with Joyce Marcus) Caciques and Their People (Anthropological Papers of the Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan, vol. 89, 1994), and has published in such varied journals as Ethnohistory, Hispanic American Historical Review, and Ancient Mesoamerica.

At UMass Boston, Prof. Zeitlin teaches undergraduate courses on Mesoamerican and Andean prehistory, introductory archaeology, ancient cities and states, ethnic identity, and a general education seminar on the Aztec-Spanish encounter. Her graduate courses focus on colonialism in the Americas and ethnohistorical methodology. She coordinates the Intermediate Seminar Program and chairs the Faculty Council General Education Committee. Off-campus she serves on the Massachusetts Historical Commission.
She also teaches courses and advises students in the Historical Archaeology Graduate (M.A.) Program.