Academics

Chinese (Minor)

The Department of Modern Languages offers a rapidly expanding program in Chinese language, literature and culture that includes a Minor in Chinese.

Course offerings are designed to serve the educational needs of students who wish to acquire knowledge of Chinese from the elementary to the advanced level, and who wish to explore the richness of Chinese literary and cultural traditions. The main objective is to provide students with practical and intellectually challenging undergraduate study that will enable them to make effective use of different languages in pursuit of their professional and personal goals.

In addition to elementary, intermediate, and advanced courses in modern standard Mandarin (Chinse 101, 102, 201, 202, and 301), the department offers students a variety of courses in Chinese literature, culture, and film.

MINOR IN CHINESE

• Chinese 201 and 202 (Intermediate Chinese I and II)
• One other 200-level Chinese course
• Chinese 301 (Advanced Chinese I)
• One other 300- or 400-level Chinese course
• One course in English from a list approved by the department (consisting of non-departmental courses at the 200-level or above)

Students who place out of Chinese 201/02 must substitute one course at the 200-level or above from the lists of China-related courses. Only one course in the Chinese Minor can be double-counted toward any Major. Courses taken P/F will not count toward the Minor.

Two courses beyond Chinese 201-202 must be taken within the department.

Existing non-departmental courses that can count toward the minor:

Art 258 (Arts of China); ASAMST 350 (Asian American Literary Voices); ASAMST 370 (Asian American Media Literacy); ASIAN 371 (Environmental Issues in China); EAS L360 (Traditional China); EAS L361 (History of Modern China); EAS L359 (Women in China); Honors 290a (The Idea of Asia); MDNLNG/ASIAN 365L (Icons of East Asia); Phil 297 (Asian Philosophy); RelSty L232 (East Asian Religions: Buddhism and Taoism); RelSty L358 (Psychology, Politics, and Philosophy in East Asia)