In the Media

Asian-Americans urged to vote, run for office ›

The Boston Globe | August 04, 2017
Paul Watanabe, the director of the Institute for Asian American Studies, says the creation of a Boston chapter of the Asian Pacific Islander American Public Affairs Association is "important." "The opening of the [chapter] is an opportunity to address the larger issues," he said.

Amy Sangiolo Wants To Be Newton’s First Asian-American Mayor ›

Patch | August 03, 2017
If elected, Amy Sangiolo would be the first woman mayor of Newton and the first Asian-American mayor. Paul Watanabe, the director of the Institute for Asian American Studies, said, "I think it's historic."

Lawmakers Strike Back Against Voter-Approved Ballot Measures ›

The Pew Charitable Trusts | July 28, 2017
Associate Professor of Political Science Maurice Cunningham notes the growing influence of big money in initiative campaigns, which makes it easier for lawmakers to claim that a ballot measure may not really reflect the will of the voters.

Gender Inequity Persists In State Legislature ›

WGBH-TV | July 27, 2017
Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science Erin O'Brien says Cindy Friedman's election to the Massachusetts Senate in this week's special election does not mean the Bay State has made sufficient progress on gender equity in politics. "It's not all sunshine and rainbows, but it is progress."

Districts lose funds when top politicians depart ›

Gloucester Daily Times | July 24, 2017
Associate Professor of Political Science Mo Cunningham says state Representative Brian Dempsey's resignation is tough for his district. “It’s a wonderful thing if your community is represented by someone in leadership. ... You get all the money and resources, not to mention the political clout.”

Charter school advocates refocus, but foes skeptical ›

Boston Herald | July 19, 2017
Associate Professor of Political Science Maurice Cunningham questions the claim of charter school proponents that their voices were drowned out by the Massachusetts Teachers Association. “How does your voice get drowned out when you spend $25 million?”

These governors won over unlikely voters and have some lessons for Washington ›

Business Insider | July 15, 2017
Charlie Baker leads the nation's governors with a 75 percent approval rating in a state where just 10 percent of voters are registered Republicans. "He's the Republican you want to have over for dinner," Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science Erin O'Brien said.

Republican PACs take aim at Warren ›

Salem News | June 29, 2017
Associate Professor of Political Science Maurice Cunningham analyzes Deal Her Out PAC's campaign against Senator Elizabeth Warren. “The money that is going to come in is really meant to damage her ahead of 2020. I don’t think they expect anyone to beat her. They want to wound her.”

Skeptics say political unity likely to be brief ›

Boston Herald | June 15, 2017
Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science Erin O'Brien says the bipartisan comity in the aftermath of the shooting at a Congressional baseball practice is unlikely to last. “We’re going to forget about it in a week or two, sadly. ... I wish this were a turning point."

Baker seen as almost unbeatable ›

State House News | May 06, 2017
Chair and Associate Professor of Political Science Erin O'Brien says having Senator Elizabeth Warren at the top of the ballot could hurt Republican Governor Charlie Baker's chances of getting re-elected.