About Us

View of the University of Massachusetts Boston's Campus Center from the water

The fastest growing college on UMass Boston's vibrant harbor campus, the College of Nursing and Health Sciences is known for its academic rigor, rich clinical experiences and research and development in best practices in health and clinical care. We offer the only publicly-supported programs in nursing and exercise and health sciences in the Greater Boston area.

Our traditional BS program, accelerated BS program and Online RN-to-BS prepare students for professional nursing practice. Our BS in Exercise and Health Sciences offers concentrations in Health Sciences, Fitness Instruction and Management, and Exercise Science.

A pioneer in innovative post-graduate nurse education, our MS in Nursing program offers Family Nurse Practitioner, Adult Gerontological Nurse Practitioner and Acute/Critical Care Clinical Nurse Specialist concentrations. The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program interweaves coursework in health systems leadership, policy development, and interdisciplinary collaboration to prepare advanced practice nurses with transformational leadership skills in program development and policy change. The PhD Program in Nursing, with concentrations in Health Policy and Population Health, prepares graduates for leadership positions as policy analysts, researchers, and educators.

We also offer Post-Master’s Certificate Programs in Family Nurse Practitioner and Adult Gerontological Nurse Practitioner.

The College of Nursing and Health Sciences is home to the state-of-the art Center for Clinical Education and Research (CCER), where students can treat lifelike simulated patients in surroundings that duplicate actual hospital conditions, and their performances can be recorded for later review and discussion with faculty members. Our faculty and students engage in projects at GoKids Boston, a research, education training and community outreach center that teaches and promotes physical fitness, healthy eating and mental well-being in young people from urban populations that are traditionally underserved.