Academics

Course Catalog

GRAD > ANTH

Anthropology

  • ANTH 615  Public Archaeology

    Description:
    An examination of cultural resource management in New England and the United States. This course studies the significance of state and federal environmental and historic preservation legislation, and the implementation of these laws from drafting proposals and the granting of contracts to the collection of data and its analysis for recommendations to mitigate the impact of construction on archaeological sites. Students learn the processes of national register nomination, problem-oriented proposal and report writing, and calculation of budget estimates for proposed work.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ANTH 625  Graduate Seminar in Historical Archaeology

    Description:
    This course provides an overview of the field of Historical Archaeology. Since its emergence in the 1960's, historical archaeology has grown to become the most rapidly expanding field of archaeological research. Starting with a focus on North America, historical archaeology is now a global field that concentrates on the study of the emergence of the modern world and other complex societies. Drawing on a rich palette of interdisciplinary approaches, historical archaeology explores complex global processes such as colonization, industrialization, urbanization, and globalization. This course will focus on the methods employed by the field's practitioners, the various contexts in which this work is conducted, and the theoretical underpinnings of the field as a whole.   More Info

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  • ANTH 635  Material Life in New England

    Description:
    Material Life in New England draws on both archaeological and non-archaeological sources (particularly vernacular architecture and material culture studies) to familiarize students with the analysis of material remains from the period between European colonization and the mid- 19th century in New England. Focusing on houses and households (rather than on institutions or industry), the course follows a roughly chronological framework to examine New England's most important archaeological sites and the questions being addressed by archaeologists in the region such as the forms of early settlements, the consumer revolution and rise of gentility in the 18th century, and the transformation of urban and rural life (through industry, reform ideologies,and trade) in the 19th century. Special atten   More Info

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  • ANTH 640  Archaeological Methods and Analysis

    Description:
    This course introduces the practice of historical archaeology in the laboratory and in the field through considerations of research design, methodology, material culture, and technical analyses of archaeological remains. The first portion of the course will involve discussions and readings on research design, field methodology, and sampling and recovery. The remaining segments will cover material culture and technical analyses in the laboratory, with a focus on ceramics, metal, glass, stone, plant remains, animal remains, and conservation techniques. The latter component of the course will be strongly devoted to hands-on, practical training in laboratory techniques and material identification.   More Info

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  • ANTH 645  Topics in Environmental Archaeology

    Description:
    This course provides an overview of tools and techniques archaeologists use to investigate the interrelationship between culture and their environments. We will explore how archaeologists and environmental scientists study past human-environment interactions, including human alteration of the environment and cultural responses to environmental change. Discussions of case studies provide examples of the interpretive power of interdisciplinary environmental archaeology research. Laboratory work with collections from archaeological sites provides practical experience and the basis for student research projects.   More Info

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  • ANTH 650  Materials in Ancient Societies

    Description:
    A one- or two-semester laboratory course offered as part of the teaching program of the Boston Area Center for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology, of which UMass Boston is a member. The topic of the course rotates annually among lithic materials, ceramics, faunal/floral materials, metals, and archaeological data analysis. The course may be taken more than once.   More Info

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  • ANTH 665  Graduate Seminar in Archaeology

    Description:
    This course is designed to provide students with a comprehensive background in current archaeological method and theory. It focuses on the major theoretical schools in archaeology, and their historical development. The course includes lectures and discussions on theory and method in archaeology, as well as discussions of methods employed in other historical disciplines. Emphasis is also given to the articulation of social theory as developed in anthropology, history, and archaeological research. Prerequisites: ANTH 240 and 241 or equivalent.   More Info

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  • ANTH 672  Culture Contact and Colonialism in the Americas

    Description:
    This course explores the multifaceted nature of colonial encounters between Europeans and indigenous people. Using the Americas as the geographical focus, the course devotes special attention to the analytical and theoretical discourse-shaping anthropological approaches to colonialism through the topics of material culture, gender, ideology, ethnicity, race, identity, labor, class, and resistance. Readings and discussions will draw on data and perspectives from ethnohistory, historical archaeology, and cultural anthropology to tackle the simultaneously global and local nature of colonialism.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ANTH 673  Anthropology of the Object: A Gradaute Socio-Cultural Oddysey

    Description:
    In Socio-Cultural Anthropology, considerable attention is placed on how people engage objects in their daily and ceremonial lives. In fact, the past two decades of material culture study in this sub-field of the anthropology has privileged objects with their `own' social lives, paths, and distinct forms of agency, all of which depend on the cultural and personal relationships people have with each other through things. In this course we explore case studies from around the globe, examining how certain genres of objects are created, used and re-used in the shifting contexts of contemporary, and historical, identity-making. The course applies socio-cultural anthropological theory to a range of social-cultural and archaeological case studies on the role of material culture in cultural identit   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ANTH 685  Summer Field School in Historical Archaeology

    Description:
    Summer field survey or excavation in historical archaeology for 6-8 weeks in the Boston or New England area. Credit will be given for any other appropriate field school or internship at another institution.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ANTH 696  Independent Study

    Description:
    Students may take this course in addition to those required in the program in order to pursue research relevant to the program of study.   More Info

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  • ANTH 697  Special Topics in Archaeology

    Description:
    The content of this course, while always relevant to the program, will vary depending on the specialty of the visiting or permanent faculty member who may teach this course on a one-time basis.   More Info

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  • ANTH 698  Practicum in Archaeology

    Description:
    For this course, graduate classroom education is applied in a practical situation, such as field work or a research project for a public archaeology contract agency, a museum, an archaeological laboratory, an historical commission, or a preservation agency. In the practicum students develop a wide range of valuable skills and experience related to possible future employment.   More Info

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  • ANTH 699  Thesis Research Projects in Historical Archaeology

    Description:
    In this course, an MA thesis will be developed from a problem-oriented analysis of documentary and archaeological data. The MA thesis will include a description of the problem in the context of the disciplines of anthropology and history, its application to the data, a description of the analyses undertaken, and their results with reference to the problem. In the conclusion the results of the research project should be discussed in relation to other current research in the field. The MA thesis must be read and approved by an examining committee made up of three faculty readers, one from the History Program, one from the Anthropology Department, and one from a department to be determined.   More Info

    Offered in: