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GRAD > APLING

Applied Linguistics

  • APLING 597  Special Topics

    Description:
    An advanced course, offering intensive study of selected topics in bilingual/ESL/foreign language pedagogy studies. Course content varies according to the topic and will be announced prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 601  Linguistics

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the basic linguistic concepts necessary for understanding how sounds, words, sentences, and texts are structured in English. Its main goal is to help students use these concepts to contrast the structure of English with the structure of other languages.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • APLING 603  Cross-Cultural Perspectives

    Description:
    This course is designed to help students develop perceptions of cultural similarities and differences from knowledge of concepts and meanings of culture. Special emphasis will be given to issues of linguistic and cultural discontinuities, the acculturation process, minority education, and inter-ethnic communication. Discussions and research will be directed toward developing multicultural educational programs and activities.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • APLING 605  Theories and Principles of Language Teaching

    Description:
    This introductory course presents students with a theoretical background in the theory of second language development and language teaching. Concepts from the fields of applied linguistics, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and education will be presented in relation to fundamental questions about language learning. The course will focus on the foundations of language acquisition to build students understanding of the relationship between research, theory and practice in second and foreign language teaching. Contributions of major schools of thought including Behaviorism, Innatism, Cognitivism, Interaction, and Sociocultural theory will be examine din relation to current and historical language teaching practices and beliefs.   More Info

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  • APLING 611  Methods and Materials in Foreign Language Instruction

    Description:
    This course seeks (1) to relate methods of teaching a foreign language to current Second Language Acquisition (SLA), research and theory and evaluate these methods; (2) to discuss classroom problems in light of current SLA theory; and (3) to look critically at textbooks and create new, specific course material to be tested and shared among all class participants. The course's hands-on approach bridges the gap between theoreticians and classroom practitioners: Students are encouraged-through reading, discussion, teaching demonstrations, and classroom observations-to explore and define the language teacher's role and to question their experience as language learners and teachers.   More Info

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  • APLING 612  Integrating Culture into the Language Curriculum

    Description:
    This course takes a hands-on approach and bridges the gap between theoreticians and classroom practitioners. Participants can tie in their critical understanding of cross-cultural perspectives into numerous aspects of the language curriculum. They explore how culture has been taught traditionally and how cultural values are embodied in authentic documents. They gain awareness of potential cultural conflicts between their own culture and the culture they teach or their students' culture. Discussion and research are directed towards developing instructional units based on a large variety of authentic documents that reflect multicultural diversity and help students discover and resolve cultural conflicts.   More Info

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  • APLING 614  Foundations of Bilingual/Multicultural Education

    Description:
    This course is designed to expose students to issues pertaining to the historical, philosophical, legal, and theoretical foundations of bilingualism, and bilingual/multilingual education. Through the study of pertinent literature, students will develop a theoretical and philosophical framework that will enable them to better understand language policies and the politics of diversity and multiculturalism, and their implications for education in the United States and worldwide.   More Info

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  • APLING 615  Meth & Material Bil

    Description:
    This course examines major contemporary theories of learning in bilingual education, with focus on instructional improvement strategies and objectives and procedures of evaluation as they relate to the developmental needs of elementary and secondary bilingual students. Course participants acquire an understanding of the process of developing culturally embedded teaching materials in the areas of art, music, social science, and language arts.   More Info

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  • APLING 616  Curriculum Development in Bilingual Education

    Description:
    This course is designed to expose students to issues pertaining to the historical and theoretical foundations of curriculum studies in general, and of bilingual curriculum, in particular. The course will briefly trace the history of curriculum studies and then, delve in the theory, application, design, development and implementation of bilingual curriculum. Through the study of pertinent literature, students will develop a theoretical and practical framework and become familiar with the processes involved in the bilingual education curriculum. Students will explore what schools teach to language learners, what should they teach and who should decide about it; what is the primary aim of bilingual education; and what beliefs, values, or attitudes are learned from the way bilingual classrooms are.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 618  Teaching ESL: Methods and Approaches

    Description:
    This course familiarizes students with schools of thought that frame teaching English as a second language to immigrant children, youth, and adults in the US and elsewhere. Students will explore many language teaching methods and approaches with special focus placed on Sheltered English Instruction (the mandated instructional approach for ELLs in Massachusetts and in influential model world-wide). Course readings will examine psycholinguistic, sociocultural, and historical influences on ESL and Sheltered English instruction. Students evolving understanding of teaching and learning English as second language will contribute to awareness of why and how their decisions affect a specific teaching context and will support informed pedagogical choices.   More Info

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  • APLING 621  Psycholinguistics

    Description:
    This course introduces students to contemporary issues and theories of language development and to the field of Second Language Acquisition (SLA). It presents an overview of the major research findings on language learning during the last forty years: e.g., universal features of the L2 learner and the L2 learning process, nature and route or acquisition, Interlanguage, cross-linguistic influences; role of the environment and environmental triggers of acquisition; cognitive contributions. Students examine a range of SLA epistemologies and theories that attempt to account for some of these research finding and the issues they have raised. They practice critically evaluation specific research studies and understanding their connections with current perspectives in the field.   More Info

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  • APLING 623  Sociolinguistics

    Description:
    This course focuses on the study of language variation and its social, political and cultural significance. Students evaluate current sociolinguistic theory and research in sociolinguistics. Topics include language attitudes, language identity, societal and individual bilingualism, language policy, Black English Vermicular (BEV/Ebonics, creoles/pidgins, and language variation by SES, ethnicity, and gender.   More Info

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  • APLING 625  Second Language Acquisition

    Description:
    Exploring the acquisition of representative language forms or language functions by second language speakers, this course draws on contrastive linguistics for patterns of systematic variation among languages or continua along which languages vary; it also draws on empirical second language research for regularities in learners' performance that reveal how their individual, internal representations of the target language systematically change with meaningful exposure to that language.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 627  Phonetics and Phonemics

    Description:
    This course will cover the sound system of English and the principles of phonetics and phonemics as well as provide an introduction to phonology. Students will practice using this knowledge to do error analysis and to teach aural/oral skills.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 629  The Structure of the English Language

    Description:
    This course covers ways of describing the structure of English, starting with traditional methods used in many textbooks and finishing with alternative methods. It will discuss teaching methodologies and sociolinguistic considerations and provide opportunities for practice in applying these theories and techniques.   More Info

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  • APLING 633  Discourse Analysis in ESL

    Description:
    This course will deal with approaches to discourse analysis, which will be defined as a set of procedures for interpreting utterances in context. The course will examine different descriptive models from the disciplines of linguistics, sociology, and anthropology and apply them to a variety of texts and contexts. It will concentrate on face-to-face oral interaction, but some aspects of written or "planned" texts will also be discussed. The models of discourse analysis will be applied to the areas of everyday conversation, classroom interaction, and (native/non-native) interaction in interviews, classrooms, and everyday conversation.   More Info

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  • APLING 635  Literacy & Culture

    Description:
    The course will take a sociolinguistic and anthropological approach to the analysis of discourse and, in so doing, seek to clarify the distinction between "oral style" strategies and "literate style" strategies in communication. It will look at so-called "oral cultures" and cultures influenced by writing, as well as at cross-cultural differences in orientation toward spoken communication and language and literacy socialization practices. A great deal of emphasis in class will be placed on the analysis of "non-literary" texts: e.g., interactions between teachers and young children as the children tell stories during "Show and Tell," interactions between writing instructor and student writers during writing conferences, narratives told by adolescents who speak Black English Vernacular, written texts produced by student writers from various non-mainstream backgrounds.   More Info

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  • APLING 637  Ethnography of Education: Culture, Language, & Literacy

    Description:
    This course addresses the how and why of ethnographic inquiry. It introduces students to ethnographic approaches and methodologies, and, more importantly, to the kinds of questions ethnographers ask. A key emphasis is on demystifying the field of research and applying ethnographic methods and techniques suitable for the study of culture, language, and schooling. Students read and critically assess a variety of ethnographic research that addresses issues in class, ethnicity/race, culture, language, and learning. Students will also implement anthropological and sociological approaches and insights in planning for and conducting ethnographic observations and interviews. As a final assignment, students will be required to write a project proposal proposing to study and issue related to ethnicity/race, culture, language, and education.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 665  Immigration and Education

    Description:
    This course familiarizes students with theory and research on the education of immigrant children, youth and adults in the US and worldwide. Students will draw on interdisciplinary lenses, including contributions from psychological, sociological, anthropological and educational research, to understand and apply current perspectives on immigration to local contexts. Students will explore the implications of the growing presence of immigrant-origin students in public schools in the US and other post-industrial societies. The course will consider the role of gender, social-economic status, race, ethnicity, undocumented status and a variety of social context factors which affect the adaptation of immigrant students and families with special focus placed on education settings. Our evolving understanding of the pathways immigrant student take as they negotiate schooling and life in a new country will contribute to informed policy, curriculum and pedagogy choices.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 669  Writing Theories in Second Language Instruction

    Description:
    This course will consider the key issues in writing theory, research, and pedagogy as they are specifically related to writing in a second language. It will introduce students to the existing research and developing theories on the composing process and examine, critique, and evaluate current and traditional theories and practices by exploring the ways in which theory and research can be translated into instruction.   More Info

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  • APLING 670  Testing in the Bilingual/ESL Classroom

    Description:
    Students will become familiar with language proficiency and language dominance testing and with other measurement and evaluative procedures needed in the administration and instruction of limited English proficient students in ESL and bilingual programs.   More Info

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  • APLING 673  Reading in the Bilingual/English as a Second Language (ESL) Classroom

    Description:
    This course is designed to expose students to current debates over various perception of what constitutes literacy, especially in regard to education English language learners (ELLs). Class participants will critically analyze reading theories and research in reference to bilingual and ESL reading practices. As part of this overview, participants will analyze a number of reading approaches and methods, including sociocultural and psycholinguistic orientations toward literacy development, bilingualism, and second language reading development. The course will also examine informal language, literacy assessment of ELLS, and current implementation of the Massachusetts state-defined English language arts framework and ESL standards. Finally, participants will study and evaluate current L2 reading instructional and informal assessment methodologies and strategies in light of current research and theory.   More Info

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  • APLING 674  ESL Materials Development

    Description:
    This course surveys major methodological trends in curriculum and syllabus design and provides an overview of ESL materials and an analysis of ESL texts. While engaged in extensive review of existing materials, students explore possibilities for adaptation, supplementation, and development of original materials for specific ESL populations.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • APLING 678  Technology In Eductn

    Description:
    This course has two primary goals: (1) to survey the various kinds of technological resources available for use in the ESL classroom; and (2) to evaluate critically the use of technology in the ESL classroom and the extent to which it is compatible with current theories of language acquisition.   More Info

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  • APLING 685  Bilingual/ESL Classroom

    Description:
    This course is designed to address the need for the integration of the Internet in the language classroom, whether in the form of web-enhanced or web-based lessons. Special focus is placed on the ways the Internet can be used to enrich, enhance, and deliver lesson plans that successfully address language goals and the needs of second language learners. Students taking this course gain competence in effectively browsing the web, integrating Web resources for educational resources, and thoughtfully using technology and the Internet to plan classroom activities. Issues such as the digital divide, acceptable use policies, copyright, quality assurance, and content validity are addressed with the aim of developing a theoretical framework and thinking about the Internet critically.   More Info

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  • APLING 696  Independent Study

    Description:
    This course will provide opportunities for students to work independently in one of the following areas: Applied Linguistics, Psycholinguistics, Sociolinguistics, Second Language and Bilingual Methodology, and Cross-Cultural Studies. Students who wish to do an independent study should submit a study plan, including: a brief description of their area of interest and an outline of the topic they plan to research in terms of content, time, and the structure of their project. To be eligible to take an independent study course students should be at the end of the course work for the MA and have at least a 3.5 GPA. All research plans for an independent study should be approved by their advisor and the Graduate Program Director.   More Info

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  • APLING 697  Special Topics in Applied Linguistics

    Description:
    An advanced course, offering intensive study of selected topics in bilingual/ESL/foreign language pedagogy studies. Course content varies according to the topic and will be announced prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • APLING 698  Practicum/Field Experience

    Description:
    A supervised, on-site experience in the teaching of bilingual education, ESL, or foreign language pedagogy in a school or in a social or educational agency serving limited English proficient students. Students must meet with their academic advisor to discuss available practicum options. Students interested in a licensure practicum must meet with the licensure specialist to discuss options.   More Info

    Offered in: