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Course Catalog

GRAD > BIOL

Biology

  • BIOL 506  Marine and Coastal Ecological Research

    Description:
    This course emphasized supervised independent research into the adaptations and interactions of organisms of Nantuckets beaches, salt marshes, sand dunes, watershed, and embayments. Students will be exposed to tools, techniques and statistical analyses used in community ecology, oceanography and related fields. Individualized research projects have included in the past a wide variety of topics such as plant/animal interactions in the marsh, impact of nitrogen on marsh plants, and the impact of tidal cycles on plankton community dynamics.   More Info

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  • BIOL 510  Cell Biology & Genetics - A Human Approach

    Description:
    In-depth exploration of the biological principles, content knowledge, and pedagogical strategies needed for teaching cell and molecular biology and genetics at the middle and high school levels. The course takes a human biology approach to these areas, using activities and examples drawn from the human body. Content is aligned with the Massachusetts state standards and National Science Education Standards. The course consists of explanation of concepts, laboratory activities, problem-solving exercises, classroom discussion, readings, and other assignments. Emphasis is placed on gaining a rich understanding of biological concepts, while modeling the use of hands-on, inquiry-based teaching strategies.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 514  Developmental Biology

    Description:
    This course studies plant function with emphasis on nutrition, translocation, metabolism, signal transduction and gene expression, photosynthesis and respiration, hormonal controls during vegetative and reproductive growth, and responses to environmental signals and stresses.   More Info

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  • BIOL 518  Neurobiology Lecture

    Description:
    This course examines the nervous system, beginning at the membrane and cellular level and then moving on to the organization of sensory and motor systems. Special topics include the biological basis of various neurological and psychiatric diseases.   More Info

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  • BIOL 519  Endocrinology Lecture

    Description:
    This course studies hormone physiology and biochemistry in the context of organismal regulation and coordination. Topics include hormone chemistry, control and regulation of hormone production, and the cellular and biochemical nature of hormone action. Emphasis is placed on mammalian systems and on laboratory and clinical investigations of the endocrine system.   More Info

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  • BIOL 523  Plant Physiology (Lecture only)

    Description:
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  • BIOL 529  Plant Life Lecture

    Description:
    This course is an advanced survey of plant diversity, the major groups, their organization and reproduction, the elements of taxonomy and economic botany of vascular plants, and the major issues of conservation biology.   More Info

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  • BIOL 533  Marine Invertebrates Lecture

    Description:
    This course provides and essential background for those planning to concentrate in organismic biology, evolution, ecology, or applied environmental science. The course covers life histories, ecological roles, adaptations, morphologies, evolution, and classification of marine invertebrate animals.   More Info

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  • BIOL 534  Microbiology

    Description:
    This course focuses on the study of viruses, bacteria, algae, fungi, and protozoa, to include their characterization, classification, and relationship to humans and the environment. Lecture topics include microbial biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, taxonomy, pathogenic bacteriology, food and industrial microbiology, and ecology. The laboratory emphasizes aseptic techniques to isolate, culture, observe, and identify bacteria.   More Info

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  • BIOL 535  Teachin Ecology, Evolution, & the Diversity of Life

    Description:
    This course will explore ecology, evolution, and the diversity of life, building on current and future curriculum materials at the middle and secondary school levels, as well as State and National standards for the teaching of biology. Students will participate in laboratory exercises drawn from national science standards-based middle and high school instructional materials. These exercises will provide an opportunity to review these teaching materials and methods and discuss research-based strategies for communicating with students.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 538  Insect Life

    Description:
    This course considers physiological and other adaptations that account for the survival and success of insect life. The laboratory deals primarily with the diversity of insects. Brief consideration is also given to the relationship of insects to humans.   More Info

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  • BIOL 539  Comparative Animal Physiology

    Description:
    This course considers physiological principles and problems in a phylogenetic perspective. An integrated view of physiological solutions from the cellular to organismal level is used to discuss adaptations to environments and constraints on life history. Major topics to be considered include temperature responses, biological clocks, allometry, respiration, circulation, energetics, locomotion, and salt and water balance.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 542  Ecology Lecture

    Description:
    This course studies population and community ecology. Topics include theory and case studies of population dynamics, competition, predation, niche concepts, life history strategies, behavioral interactions, energetics and productivity, community structure and organization, and biogeography.   More Info

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  • BIOL 545L  Biology in Society: Critical Thinking

    Description:
    Current and historical cases are used to examine the political, ethical, and other social dimensions of the life sciences. Close examination of developments in the life sciences can lead to questions about the social influences shaping scientists' work or its application. This, in turn, can lead to new questions and alternative approaches for educators, biologists, health professionals, and concerned citizens. The specific thematic emphasis each semester is publicized by the Program. BIOL 545L and CRCRTH 645L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 552  Evolution (Lecture only)

    Description:
    This course focuses on evolution as the unifying concept of biology. Topics include population genetics, adaptive strategies, sex and breeding systems, speciation and population differentiation, fossil histories, and the evolution of man.   More Info

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  • BIOL 559  Caribbean Tropical Ecology, and Conservation Biology

    Description:
    This field-based course, conducted in Puerto Rico, will introduce students to the basics of tropical ecology, evolution, and conservation biology through a mixture of lectures, field excursions, and independent projects.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 560  Bioinformatics

    Description:
    This course provides a fundamental overview of bioinformatics, which is the collection, organization, and analysis of biological information. Topics include data searches and sequence alignments, substitution patterns, phylogenetics, genomics, protein, and RNA structure prediction, and proteomics.   More Info

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  • BIOL 572  Molecular Biology (Lecture only)

    Description:
    This course studies the molecular biology and biochemistry of gene expression in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Topics include DNA structure/physical biochemistry, recombinant DNA technology, techniques in research, DNA synthesis, RNA synthesis, protein synthesis, operons, chromatin structure and gene regulation, oncogenes, hormones and growth factors and signal transductions, transposons, mutagenesis and repair, flowering, photosynthesis, development, circadian rhythms.   More Info

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  • BIOL 580  Intro to Immunology Lecture

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to the principles of immunology, including definition of antigens and antibodies, specificity of the immune response, immunoglobulin synthesis, cellular cooperation in the immune response, mechanism of inflammation, transplantation, and diseases associated with responsiveness of the immune system.   More Info

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  • BIOL 597  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course addresses a specific topic within this subject discipline. Courses under this title are offered as one-time supplements to the sponsoring department's curriculum.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 606  Freshwater Ecology

    Description:
    This course investigates freshwater ecosystems from a physical, chemical, biological, and ecological prospective. In lecture students will be exposed to concepts and environmental applications of freshwaters such as properties of water, movement of light, heat, and chemicals, physiography of flowing and non-flowing freshwater, redox and oxygen, hydrologic, carbon, iron, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfer cycling, biodiversity, behavior, predation, competition, food webs, nutrient use and mineralization, disturbance, succession, production, and trophic state and eutrophication. In the laboratory students will learn techniques to collect, analyze, interpret, and report on physical chemical, biological, and ecological parameters of freshwater ecosystems. Some laboratory exercises will require outside of the classroom activities such as collecting ore measuring parameters in local streams, lakes, and ponds.   More Info

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  • BIOL 607  An Introduction to Computational Data Analysis for Biology

    Description:
    This course will cover the basic statistical knowledge necessary for students in biology to design, execute, and analyze a basic research project. The course aims to have students focus on thinking about the biological processes that they are studying in their research and how to translate them into statistical models. The course will take a hands-on computational approach, teaching students the statistical programming language R. In addition to teaching the fundamentals of data analysis, we will emphasize several key concepts of efficient computer programming that students can use in a variety of other areas outside of data analysis.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 612  Advanced Cell Biology

    Description:
    The analysis of gene transfer and expression at the cellular level, including the nature of metabolic systems and the factors governing their regulation.   More Info

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  • BIOL 615  Immunology

    Description:
    Selected topics in immunology are studied in depth, using the current literature. Topics are chosen for relevance and current interest, or for their challenging, even controversial nature.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 625  Genomics and Biotechnology

    Description:
    This course provides an overview of genomics and covers topics such as mapping genomes, acquiring genomes and annotating genomes. Students will critically assess the genome projects from various organisms. Special emphasis will be given to technologies that contribute to and stem from the advances in genome sciences, including principles of sequencing, computational tools for gene annotation, functional genomic tolls for systems genetics, and technologies for massively parallel analyses of gene function. The applications of these techniques to various areas of biology will also be presented.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 626  Molecular Genetics of Bacteria

    Description:
    In-depth examination of genetic and molecular processes in bacteria and their associated viruses. Coverage of classical bacterial genetics as well as modern molecular genetic analysis. Topics include genetic transfer processes, gene regulation, mutagenesis and repair, plasmids, transposons, gene fusion methodologies, and protein secretion. Emphasis is given to current experimental approaches and research design. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 627  Bacterial Physiology and Functional/Comparative Genomics

    Description:
    The objective of this course is to survey bacterial and archaeal structures, physiology, and underlying mechanisms. Key topics include bacterial cell composition and organization, the structure and function of bacterial cell components, assembly and polymerization of the bacterial cell, biosynthesis and energetics, bacterial cell growth, bacterial population growth, effect of key environmental parameters on cell growth, cell communication, the bacterial genome and its plasticity, coordination of metabolic reactions, regulation of gene expression at the operon and global levels, the bacterial cell cycle, control of bacterial growth rate, cellular differentiation, and physiological ecology of bacteria. The understanding of these bacterial properties is based in large part on functional and comparative microbial genomics; i.e., comparison of gene sets as the sequences become available, as well as recent biochemical, genetic, microscopic and physiological research advances.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 628  Microbial Ecology

    Description:
    The functions, roles, and ecology of microorganisms in the environment, emphasizing biogeochemical cycling of elements. Topics for special concentration are chosen from the following: microbial diversity, evolution, interactions, aquatic or soil microbiology, and sewage microbiology. The course focuses on relating molecular and biochemical mechanisms to ecological principles. Readings are assigned from classical and current scientific literature for class discussion. An in-depth review paper on a special topic is required.   More Info

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  • BIOL 629  Host Microbe Interactions

    Description:
    This is a new Biology graduate course that will introduce students to the field of host-microbe interactions. Topics will include the molecular genetics of model symbioses and the impact of evolution and ecology in shaping these interactions. Students will read primary literature and current review articles, and these readings will serve as discussion topics during the class period.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 631  Microbial Genome Evolution: Gene Establishment, Survival, and Exchange

    Description:
    This course examines the genetic and molecular processes that underlie microbial genome evolution. Topics will include processes involved in generating genetic diversity: for example, spontaneous mutagenesis, horizontal gene transfer, and transposition. These molecular events will be discussed within the context of ecological and lifestyle pressure that help shape genome content and architecture. Students will read one primary literature article with a current book chapter or review article, and these readings will serve as the discussion focus during the class period.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 634  Methods in Phylogenetics and Macroevolutionary Analysis

    Description:
    Evolutionary biology is unique in the biological sciences because it is, to a large extent, a historical discipline. In the absence of direct paleontological data one of the best resources we have for studying evolutionary history over very long timescales I phylogenetic biology. In the first part of this course, students will survey the theory and application of modern phylogeny inferences. In the second part of this course, students will learn the important theory and practical methods of phylogenetic comparative biology the use of inferred trees in evolutionary inferences. This course will consist of a combined weekly lecture & computer lab; regular computer exercises; and two independent projects in which the students may use their own dataset or one obtained from an online data repository.   More Info

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  • BIOL 635  Population Genetics and Diversity

    Description:
    A quantitative approach to the concept of populations and the evolutionary forces affecting them. The course analyzes the interactions among forces and the resulting dynamics of population structure. Toward the end of the semester, the course shifts its primary emphasis from lecture to discussion in order to cover current topics in population genetics. Topics include the theory and application of tools necessary for assaying genetic variation in natural populations, DNA fingerprinting in forensics, the evolution of sex, and the genetics of rare and endangered species.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 638  Advanced Ecology

    Description:
    Concepts of population and community ecology. Topics covered may include population dynamics, life history strategies, theory of r- and K-selection, competition, predation, community organization, and species diversity. Particular emphasis is placed on the relationship between theoretical and empirical ecology. A weekly tutorial provides the opportunity for greater discussion of material covered in lecture. Emphasis changes from year to year.   More Info

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  • BIOL 639  Conservation Biology

    Description:
    The principles of conservation biology are drawn from such various subdisciplines of biology as ecology, genetics, evolution, and biogeography. The course begins with an analysis of the distribution of biodiversity, proceeds to examine the patterns of biodiversity loss at all levels, from genes to ecosystems, and finishes with a discussion of the causes, consequences, and solutions of the crisis. Topics include assessment and monitoring of species diversity, conservation genetics, the theory of island biogeography, habitat loss and forest fragmentation, human impacts on biodiversity, the design of nature reserves, economic valuation of biodiversity, and sustainable use of biodiversity.   More Info

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  • BIOL 641  Quantitative Population Modeling

    Description:
    Fundamentals of mathematical models of population dynamics. The course examines single-species models, including stability analysis, life tables, and analysis of matrix models, as well as competition and predation model forms. More advanced topics include spatial structure, stochasticity, harvesting models, individual-based models, and population viability analysis. The course combines lectures, discussions, and hands-on model development.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 642  Biogeography

    Description:
    A study of the distribution of organisms in space and time. Includes comparative and experimental tests of island biogeographic theory; the significance of spatial and temporal scale; the roles of dispersal and vicariance; phylogenetic implications; geographic patterns of species diversity in marine and terrestrial ecosystems; contemporary analytical methods; mass extinctions and the fossil record; historical biogeography; macroecology; and the importance of biogeography for understanding conservation strategies and the global biodiversity crisis. Conducted in seminar format with student discussions.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 648  Invasive Species: Evolution, Ecology and Management

    Description:
    This course is designed to provide students with an up-to-date perspective on invasive species. The first half of the course will cover characteristics of successful invaders and the ecological processes that occur when a non-native species is introduced into a new habitat. There will also be an extensive review of the pathways that lead to the introduction, evolution and spread of invasives from both the past and present. The second half of the course will cover invasive species impacts and the issues of invasive species control and management. Course literature will be a mix of recent peer-reviewed articles, reports and landmark papers.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 650  Scientific Communication

    Description:
    Required of all master's and doctoral students; usually taken in the second year. The course covers the storage and retrieval of scientific information (including searching of computerized data bases), the design of tables, figures, and other graphics, the writing of technical reports and papers, and the preparation of posters and publications. Writing, oral presentations and other assignments, and attendance at the weekly departmental seminar, are required.   More Info

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  • BIOL 652  Biological Diversity and Evolution

    Description:
    This course is an inquiry into the origin and evolution of patterns of biological diversity. It begins with an overview of the biogeochemical history of the Earth, theories of origin of life, diversification of metazoans during the Panerozoic, and the nature and causes of periodic mass extinction events. Biological diversity is considered at molecular, population, and community levels. This course counts toward the required core in the Environmental Sciences/Environmental Biology PhD track. (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 653  Current Literature in Biology

    Description:
    A series of one-credit seminar courses focusing on subfields of environmental biology, to help students develop the habit of keeping up with recent developments through reading scientific journals. The seminars also provide a forum for oral presentations where students can get comment and critique on their scientific progress. Students must take a minimum of five seminars, for a total of five credits. This course is part of the required core in both the Environmental Sciences/Environmental Biology and MCOB PhD tracks.   More Info

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  • BIOL 660L  Coastal Ecological Processes

    Description:
    Coastal ecosystems form a critical boundary between watersheds and the oceans and as such are influenced by processes in both habitats. From local scale impacts associated with urbanization of near shore watersheds and local fisheries to global scale impacts due to increasing acidification of the oceans and long-range transport of atmospheric pollutants, many coastal waters are under siege from numerous anthropogenic influences. Considering the vast number of ecosystem services provided by coastal waters, understanding the functioning of coastal ecosystems is a critical first step toward developing sustainable management practices. This course will study the basic functioning of coastal ecosystems and the role that human perturbations play in altering these functions. In particular we will focus on understanding the scientific aspects of coastal ecology that underlie areas of interest to coastal managers, including the science behind coastal eutrophication, ocean acidification, food web structure and function (including food web/fisheries interactions), and wetland protection and restoration. BIOL 660L and EEOS 660L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 664  Bioinformatics for Molecular Biologists

    Description:
    The research of molecular biologists is facilitated by the numerous bioinformatics tools available on the Internet. The topics include DNA and protein sequence databases, sequence alignment, searching databases, gene structure, protein-function prediction, molecular evolution and whole genome sequences. The laboratory emphasizes hands-on experience and problem solving, and how to avoid being misled by errors in databases and improper use of computer programs.   More Info

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  • BIOL 665L  Ecological Risk Assessment

    Description:
    Ecological Risk Assessment (ERA) is formal practice used by regulatory agencies worldwide to define the scope of environmental problems. The ERA framework was developed over several decades in response to inconsistencies in how risk assessments were conducted. This framework now provides a systematic method for approaching environmental problems associated with chemical contamination, and other ecological stressors. This course will use the risk assessment documents and guidelines developed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to train students in the basic methods of ERA. Students will be tasked with performing a Stressor Identification and ERA at impaired sites to demonstrate competency in these methods. In addition, this course will explore emerging topics in ERA including the broadening field of Ecological Exposure Assessment and incorporation of nonchemical stressors into ERAs.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 666  Mammalian Toxicology

    Description:
    This course provides a background in principles of toxicology in mammalian systems. It is an alternative to Environmental Toxicology, EEOS 635, as a core requirement for the Molecular, Cellular, and Organismal Biology doctoral track. Coverage includes: basic concepts of poisons and their commonalities with drugs and hormones ;toxicant exposure routes, uptake, sites and mechanisms of action, storage, metabolism, activation, and clearance; toxicant roles in carcinogenesis, development, endocrine, and reproductive functions; roles of diet, lifestyle, and concurrent exposures; methods of toxicant evaluation emphasizing multi-generation and high-throughput testing; and environmental and medical implications of toxicant/toxin expores on individual health. Students taking this course should have already completed general chemistry and organic chemistry, general biology and one advanced course in cell biology, biochemistry, or physiology.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 672  Directed Readings in Biology

    Description:
    Selected readings in advanced areas of biology with guidance and regular discussion.   More Info

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  • BIOL 673  Directed Readings

    Description:
    This course provides selected readings in advanced areas of biology with guidance and regular discussion.   More Info

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  • BIOL 674  Cell Signaling

    Description:
    This course will systematically investigate cell communication mechanisms, with an emphasis on developmental examples of cell signaling. General properties of signaling cascades will be discussed, followed by specific examples of conserved signaling pathways, such as Notch, Wnt, Hedgehog, TGF/BMP, JAK/STAT, nuclear receptors; and receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Normal and aberrant receptor signaling will be examined using experimental evidence obtained in model genetic organisms. Implications of disrupting cell communication pathways in human disease will be discussed. The course will emphasize readings from the current literature. Upon completion of this course, students will have a solid understanding of the molecular mechanisms and control principles of cellular communication in normal and pathological conditions.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 675  Advanced Molecular Biology

    Description:
    A lecture and laboratory course covering the biosynthesis and regulation of RNA, DNA, and proteins in eukaryotic organisms. The course examines the importance of gene regulation in oncogenesis, levels of gene expression, and development; as well as regulation by structure and function (chromosome structure and translational regulation); basic research techniques; and current recombinant DNA methodology. Please note: Labs meet every other week, for a total of seven hours every two weeks.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 676  Advanced Molecular Biology Lecture

    Description:
    A lecture-only course covering the same material as BIOL 675; no lab work is required.   More Info

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  • BIOL 677  Advanced Eukaryotic Genetics

    Description:
    A broad spectrum of readings in plant, animal, and fungal genetics on such topics as segregation distortion, the control of sex determination, modes of asexual reproduction, inheritance of cytoplasmic genomes, self-incompatibility systems, transposable elements, and genetic mapping.   More Info

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  • BIOL 678  Protein Chemistry and Enzymology

    Description:
    A lecture and laboratory course on various aspects of protein chemistry and enzymology. Emphasis is on purification, characterization, structure, function, mechanism of action, kinetics, and regulatory aspects of enzymes. Topics also include the practical and theoretical aspects of affinity chromatography and other separation techniques, immobilization of enzymes and other biomolecules, enzyme kinetics, and the analytical and industrial use of soluble and insoluble enzymes.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 679  Protein Chemistry and Enzymology Lecture

    Description:
    A lecture-only course covering the same material as BIOL 678; no lab work is required.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 680L  Physical Biochemistry

    Description:
    This course serves as an introduction to analytical methods and instrumentation available to the interdisciplinary scientist. While no course can be comprehensive in this field, this course will examine a broad base of analytical methods through introductory theory and will highlight applications and recent developments in these methods through current primary literature. BIOL 680L and CHEM 680L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 681  Network Biology

    Description:
    This graduate course introduces the students to an emerging field of Network Biology. The course covers general properties of biological networks, and continues with an in-depth treatment of the properties of the transcriptional, metabolic, protein-protein interaction, and signaling networks. Special emphasis is given to the technical advances in collection and analysis of high throughput data and to the associated information repositories. Reading assignments are largely based on the current literature in the field, through two texts will be recommended as additional resources. Exercises in a computer lab will give students hands-on experience with biological network analysis. The course is intended primarily for Ph.D. and masters students but is open to advanced undergraduates by permission of instructor.   More Info

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  • BIOL 685  Biomedical Tracers

    Description:
    A seminar and laboratory course describing the types and uses of physical tracers in the biomedical sciences. Covers theory and application of various tracers (immunoglobins, radioisotopes, lectins, enzymes, chromogen labels, spin labels, heavy isotopes, and particles), instrumentation for their detection, and general methods. The laboratory includes demonstrations and short projects chosen by the students and the instructor.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 691  Seminar in Developmental Biology

    Description:
    Current problems in developmental biology. Topics include molecular and cellular differentiation, and pattern determination.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 693  Seminar in Neurobiology

    Description:
    Discussion of current literature in neuropharmacology and drug and behavior interactions. Combination of lectures and student presentations.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 694  Research Experimentation in Biology

    Description:
    This independent study provides students with sustained experience in a research laboratory. Each student pursues a specific research project, which may originate in a public or private sector laboratory or at the University. Each student's project should involve the student in ideas and laboratory skills and should permit the student to produce work of publishable quality.   More Info

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  • BIOL 697  Special Topics in Biology

    Description:
    A field of current interest in biology is examined in detail.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • BIOL 698  Projects in Biology

    Description:
    A substantial written report based on library research or an original project such as curriculum design, design of teaching aids and exercises, or critique of a book or theory. No more than 6 credits of this course may be applied to the master's degree. The credits may be applied over more than one semester. BIOL 698 and BIOL 699 are mutually exclusive.   More Info

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  • BIOL 699  Thesis Research

    Description:
    Substantial laboratory or field research resulting in a master's thesis. No more than 10 credits of this course may be applied to the master's degree. The credit may be applied over more than one semester. Students may not receive credit for both BIOL 698 and BIOL 699.   More Info

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  • BIOL 899  Dissertation Research

    Description:
    These are course credits for research conducted under the supervision of members of the faculty within the Biology Department and leading to the presentation of a doctoral dissertation within one of the PhD programs housed within the Biology department.   More Info

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