Academics

Course Catalog

GRAD > ECON

Economics

  • ECON 601  Applied Microeconomics

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the theory of consumer behavior and the firm, market and multi-market equilibrium and stability, and varieties of imperfect competition at the graduate level. Coverage includes theories of consumer and producer behavior in the context of a variety of real world problems. Applied examples will be drawn from fields including: information economics, environmental economics, economics of regulation, industrial organization, law and economics, natural resource economics, public finance, labor economics, and regional and urban economics. For each sub-discipline covered, the most important economic model will be discussed and a review of the major research studies, techniques, and empirical evidence will be undertaken.   More Info

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  • ECON 602  Applied Macroeconomics

    Description:
    This course provides an introduction to macroeconomics at the graduate level. The course is concerned with economic theories of the overall level and dynamic of economic activity in countries and regions. These theories are explored by examining the following applied key macroeconomic questions: why are some nations poor while others are rich? What determines the pace of economic growth? How much richer is the typical American today than the typical American 100 years ago? What causes macroeconomic instability? What policies might governments pursue to spur growth? How do we square economic growth with our efforts to limit climate change and provide for future generations?   More Info

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  • ECON 603  Applied Economics GIS Workshop

    Description:
    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provide a powerful data storage, analysis, and presentation tool for any data with spatial attributes. Many economic issues can be addressed using GIS, including most urban economic problems. This workshop provides a short, hands-on introduction to GIS and ESRI ArcGIS software.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ECON 606  Introduction to Behavioral Economics

    Description:
    Behavioral economics is a new and quickly growing field that attempts to provide a more realist understanding of judgment and decision making in an economic context. In this course, we will discuss the short-comings of the standard economic model, and how these short-comings can be replaced with more plausible assumptions about decision making. We will apply these principles in the areas of labor markets and firm organizations, financial markets, and public policy.   More Info

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  • ECON 610  Political Economy

    Description:
    This course exposes students to the major paradigms in heterodox political economy through a set of economic topics that are central to these paradigms. Heterodox political economic paradigms include Marxist, post-keynesian, intuitional, and feminist approaches. We will use these various approaches to examine topics of particular interest to political economists including the historical rise of capitalism, workplace relations, poverty and income distribution, economic growth (accumulation) and crisis, financialization, globalization, development, gender, race, and ecological change.   More Info

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  • ECON 613  Urban Economic Environment

    Description:
    This course offers an examination of the wonders and paradoxes of urban life, with a focus on current dynamics of urban location and prosperity in the context of a global economy. It examines forces that shaped the evolution of cities and metropolitan regions, assesses a range of policy issues confronting metropolitan areas today and the respective roles played by private and public sectors in addressing those challenges, explores global forces that are transforming cities and regions throughout the world, and addresses key questions of urban well-being, civility, and civic engagement.   More Info

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  • ECON 615  Economic Demography

    Description:
    This is a course in population economics.In this course you will gain an understanding of global and national demographic trends and the theories of demographic change underlying these trends. Much of the course will focus on the economics of the family. We will analyze marriage, fertility, intergenerational ties, and mortality at the level of the individual and the household.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ECON 618  Political Economy of Violent Conflict

    Description:
    This course examines the Political Economy of Violent Conflict with a focus on low and middle income countries over the last 3 decades. Particular attention will be given to the theories and causes of war, the ways wars are waged, resource conflicts, financing of wars, the effect of war on the economy, conflict resolution, and post-conflict reconstruction and nation building. This course seeks to combine theoretical debates with country case studies as a way to illustrate the diversity of experiences and complexity of understanding conflict.   More Info

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  • ECON 651  Quantitive Research Methods I

    Description:
    This course is designed to provide an introduction to research methods in economics. It will cover an overview to working with data, measurement of economic variables, methods of data collection, data presentation, hypothesis testing, interpreting the results of various statistical procedures and comparative research methods. The focus of this course will be to develop analytical tools to evaluate the relative merits and drawbacks of various forms of economic analysis. This course will have data lab sessions that will familiarize students with the basic tools necessary to work with large datasets. Over the course of the semester students will work on developing a research question for their thesis, identify a source of data, and present descriptive statistics from this data source.   More Info

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  • ECON 652  Quantitative Research Methods II

    Description:
    The course offers a presentation of modern econometric practice. It will cover the theory and application of ordinary least-squares regression (OLS) in the context of cross-sectional, time-series, and panel data, with special emphasis placed on an applied understanding of the potential and limitations of this approach. In addition to OLS, topics will also include fixed effects, difference-indifference, regression discontinuity, and limited dependent variable regression techniques. Students will learn at least one statistical package as Stata, SPSS, or SAS. Emphasis is placed on training creative quantitative researchers.   More Info

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  • ECON 670L  Environmental and Energy Economics

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the economist's approach to solving environmental problems and related aspects of energy markets. The first part of the course concentrates on the economic theory used to solve environmental problems, including those associated with energy production and utilization. In the latter half of the course, the theory will be used as a framework to approach a wide range of environmental and energy issues. The purpose of the course is to expose students to sufficiently rigorous economic analysis to enable them to appreciate the usefulness of the economic approach to environmental and energy-related problem solving and to enable them to critique economic analyses they may be presented with in future decision-making roles. ECOn 670L and EEOS 670L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ECON 675L  Economics of Renewables: Marine and Energy Resources

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the use of economic analysis in helping to solve marine and energy related natural resource problems. The first part of the course focuses on the economic theory used to analyze natural resource and energy issues. In the latter half of the course these theoretical tools will be used as a framework to analyze a wide range of issues dealing with marine resources and renewable energy. The purpose of the course is to expose students to sufficiently rigorous economics analysis to enable them to appreciate the usefulness of the economic approach to resource and renewable energy problem solving and to critique economic analyses they may be presented with in future decision-making roles. ECON 675L and EEOS 675L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ECON 695  Independent Study

    Description:
    Study of a particular area of economics under the supervision of a faculty member.   More Info

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  • ECON 696  Independent Study

    Description:
    Study of a particular area of economics under the supervision of a faculty member.   More Info

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  • ECON 697  Special Topics

    Description:
    Various topics in Economics will be offered.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ECON 698  Mentored Research Project

    Description:
    Economics 698 is a course designed to facilitate completion of the capstone project (or thesis), a critical requirement for the MA degree in Applied Economics. Building on the previous semester's work, students will work to complete their final research projects. All students taking the course will be required to write a comprehensive research project that includes the relevant literature, descriptions of methods and data used, analysis of the findings and implications of the research.   More Info

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