Academics

Course Catalog

GRAD > ENGL

English

  • ENGL 600  Studies in Criticism

    Description:
    Study of the nature and function of literature, the terms and methods of analysis and evaluation of literature, and the various approaches possible in the criticism of literature.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 601  Studies in Poetry

    Description:
    Studies of poetry movements, individual poets, or particular formal or thematic topics in poetry. Topics have included: Contemporary Women Poets,Seamus Heaney, Elizabeth Bishop.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 602  Studies in Fiction

    Description:
    Studies in the nature of prose fiction and its major kinds; topics in the history and sociology of narrative fiction, such as the working class novel, the short story, the prose romance, the historical novel; and studies of representative British and American types in international contexts.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 603  Studies in Drama

    Description:
    A course for those who want a broad view of the sweep of Western drama, offering a study of the art of drama as it has evolved from classical Greece. Representative plays are drawn from various periods (medieval, Renaissance, Augustan, romantic, and modern) and from the major modes (tragedy, comedy, farce, realism, expressionism, and the absurdist and social theater). Selected critical works are also considered.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 605  Studies in Literature and Film

    Description:
    This course examines the relationship between fiction and film, examining issues of representation, adaptation, narrative, composition, and cultural construction. Students will explore how these verbal and visual genres connect by asking questions such as: How does storytelling operate in each genre? How does each genre rely on narrative structures such as causality and chronology? How does film develop and change literary elements such as symbolism? How does literature and film create an audience that knows its conventions? This course addresses topics such as modern life as created by fiction and film, and internationalism in contemporary British fiction and film.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 606  Books, Manuscripts, Libraries

    Description:
    From theory to hands-on work on : 1) the history of the book as artifact and agent of cultural change, and 2) the scholarly work of preserving, editing, circulating, and exhibiting manuscripts and printed materials. The course will include on site work in the Rare Books Room of the BPL and the Mass State Archives.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 607  The History of the Book

    Description:
    This course will examine the book as an artifact, exploring its manuscript, print, and digital forms, students will engage with the questions asked by history of the book scholarship by working with rare books at area libraries and archives. By literally getting their hands dirty by working with old, new, hyper, and rare texts, students will ask how historical changes in the books form connect to larger cultural changes. For example, what happened when printing press technology made books inexpensive and readily available to a buying public? The course will also analyze the way history of the book studies are being transformed due to the digital reproduction of archival materials. What does it mean to interact with a rare book online? In addition, as the course examines rare books and manuscripts, students will uncover the role of the literary scholar and his/her ability to shape the form given to the literary work. What happens to a rare book when it is edited for publication?   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 608  Introduction to Critical and Research Methods

    Description:
    This course introduces the beginning graduate student to research strategies, provides an introduction to bibliographic, textual, and a range of critical methods, contrasting, for instance, the historical method with new historicism. The aim is to explore the kinds of interpretations each critical method enables and limits. This course also explores literature, literary scholarship, and teaching as material practices and explores the consequences of different ways of conceiving of those practices. (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 609  Graduate English Colloquium

    Description:
    This course meets once a week, alternating between public colloquia and seminar tutorials, throughout either the spring or fall semester. The public sessions are led by members of the graduate faculty, while the tutorials are conducted by the graduate faculty member in charge of the colloquium seminar that semester. The colloqia concern issues of interest to scholars, teachers, and writers in English, including representative texts, literary genres and practices, literary theory, pedagogy, creative writing, editorial and archival work. The course increases students familiarity with a variety of forms and periods, introduces problems of literary history and cultural context, and demonstrates various approaches to advanced work in literature, composition/rhetoric, and creative writing. It gives students a sense of the range of literary studies and provides active examples of intellectual community. Texts are selected by colloquium faculty and by the faculty supervisor of the colloquium seminar. This is a graded seminar.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 610  The Teaching of Composition

    Description:
    This course defines the role of composition in the English curriculum in both college and secondary schools; develops a philosophy of language as a foundation for a method of composing; studies psychological and linguistic aspects of the composing process. The course is offered once each year.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 611  The Teaching of Literature

    Description:
    This course develops a theory and practice for the teaching of literature, applicable to both secondary and post-secondary education. The class reads, discusses, and analyzes sample presentations on literary texts in a variety of genres. The course serves teachers, prospective teachers, and non-teachers who seek an introduction to literature from pedagogical points of view.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 613  Teaching English with Technology

    Description:
    This course explores the potential uses of technology in the teaching of classes in English Studies. It situates this work within disciplinary pedagogical theory as it relates to the traditional areas of English Studiescomposition, literature, and language.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 614  Teaching Lit in Urban Settings

    Description:
    This course showcases literary themes that are relevant to urban students lives and to their experiences as students of English language and literature, selecting exciting materials that capture issues of identity, class, language, and culture. Urban classrooms are often enriched by high percentages of learners from various cultural and socioeconomic backgrounds, including many who are multilingual or have special needs. In this course we examine the ways in whi8ch language and literacy are acquired within urban contexts and consider how teachers can use compelling literary texts to promote this process of acquisition. The course readings which include novels, poetry, plays, short stories, autobiographical accounts, graphic novels, film, and theoretical articles enrich and illuminate our understanding of this process. Central to the course is a range of contemporary and classic literary texts that encourage engaged literary inquiry, emphasizing close reading and comprehension, interpretation and analysis, integration of knowledge and ideas, and understand of craft and structure.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 615  Teaching Literary History and Culture

    Description:
    This course directly confronts a question our students often ask: why study old literature? Starting with this basic question, this seminar encourages its students to think critically about the joys, challenges, and responsibilities of teaching the historical development of literature and the cultural contexts of literature. This class examines the idea of literary history: and the practice of teaching literature by embracing the historical and cultural worlds that create and are created by literature. Emphasizing making literature accessible and exciting to students, the course explores issues such as the literary canon, the periodization of literature, the multiethnic contexts of literature, and the use of primary source databases in literary study.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 618  Life Writing

    Description:
    This course takes as its province a wide range of biographical forms, ranging from biography, autobiography, and the memoir to personal essay, letters, case studies, and the obituary. Works may range across centuries, languages, and cultures, or be narrowly grouped. Both critical analysis and practical experiments in life writing may be required.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 619  Bestial Philosophy: Critical Animal Studies

    Description:
    The classical and medieval bestiary was an encyclopedic account of species, their attributes, and in medieval Bestiarum vocabulum, their moral meaning in God's book of the world. Animal Studies began in opposition to allegorical readings as such (including anthropomorphized and anthropocentric renderings of the animal) as a differential perspective on the self-other relation. Today, however, with the Posthuman Turn, Animal Studies connects speculative philosophies such as Object-Oriented Ontology with older forms of speculative thought, and queries the Anthropocene and its limits (as in Thing Theory), at the same time that it opens a return to a spiritually-infused understanding of the world in the Spinozan sense. In considering what we'll call a 'bestial philosophy,' we'll focus on why literary writers have long been fascinated by animals' world experience as an alternative to the anthropocentric and logocentric universe of our own construction. Animals stand in for a range of sentient life that philosophers such as Spinoza and writers such as Kafka have assumed has been interacting with us and without us all along. We will take a set of representative literary texts and read them in conjunction with a genealogy of sorts of philosophical and theoretical texts in order to understand what Animal Studies has been (both Continental and American strains) and what it is becoming in light of new understandings and sentientism.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 621  Literary Theory Today

    Description:
    What is literary theory and why should it matter? Pursuing a rigorous course of readings and writings, this course will seek to answer these related questions by introducing graduate students to several traditions of twentieth and twenty-first century thought that have been of fundamental importance to the study of literature. Literary theory has made possible a much broader and richer encounter with texts of all kinds, from novels, poems, and plays to films, media, and the visual arts; this course seeks to understand how and why literary theory encourages new experiences and understandings of texts.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 622  Ecocriticism: Environmental Criticism and Literature

    Description:
    Ecocriticism is an emerging branch of literary criticism concerned with the relationships between literature and the physical world. This course will explore how theoretical understandings of the environment can be brought to literature of the environment. In the seminar students will develop a critical vocabulary and range of methodologies for discussing such topics as: the cultural construction of nature; the poetics and politics of nature writing; land as readable text; the idea of wilderness; land as economic and spiritual resource; Native American literature; "green" pedagogy; sense of place; nature and community; gender and nature; ecofeminism; and the relationship of natural science and nature writing.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 623  The Nature of Narrative

    Description:
    This course explores a variety of ways in which modern and contemporary fiction challenge traditional narrative forms. While comparative study of experimentation is the course's main concern, it also examines theories of narration (narratology) as these illuminate the art, reception, and ideologies of twentieth-century fiction.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 624  Language of Film

    Description:
    This theory-based study in the languages of film, American and international, concerns the ways films signify. Emphasizing the crafting of films more than any particular thematic content, it explores mise-en-scene, framing, lighting, editing, camera work, sound, editing, genre, and acting as these mediate film narratives an , so, comprise their discourses. The course also explores structures of film narration as they relate to literary narration; it includes contextual consideration of history and ideology as these interact with film production and reception. Primary texts will include readings in literary and film theory, films and film excerpts, and literature.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 628  Comparative Studies of Two Writers

    Description:
    A comparative study of two major American, British, or postcolonial writers. The pairing of two writers provides a comparison of works that present affinities and oppositions in social context or theme so as to pose theoretically interesting questions for discussion, critical analysis, and further research.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 630  Chaucer

    Description:
    A study of Chaucer's major works in Middle English. Special attention will be given to such considerations as Chaucer's poetic development, his relations to his sources, medieval literary theory, and the social, political, and religious backgrounds.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 631  Medieval to Renaissance Literature

    Description:
    A course in the transition from medieval to Renaissance literature. A study of the transition in prose from homiletic writings and the romances through Elyot, Ascham, and Lyly; in lyric and narrative verse from Chaucer and the Scottish Chaucerians through Sidney; and in drama from the morality and mystery plays through Hamlet.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 633  Shakespeare

    Description:
    This course considers Shakespeares dramatic art as an art of coaching an audience (and readers) in how to respond to and understand his make-believes. Multiple plotting, recurring situation, contrasts and parallels in character and character relations (especially the use of theatricalizing characters who stage plays within the play), patterns of figurative language, repetition of visual effects these and other such structures will be considered as means whereby Shakespeare coaxes and coaches the perception of his audience, shapes the participation of mind and feeling, and especially, prepares audiences for comic or tragic outcomes. The plays are studied in the light of ongoing critical and/or theoretical debates.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 634  Elizabethan and Jacobean Literature

    Description:
    The seminar focuses attention on a select number of English Renaissance works, representing various literary genres, ranging from the age of Elizabeth through the Jacobean era into the Caroline period. Writers such as Shakespeare, Spenser, Sidney, Elizabeth I (and other woman writers), Marlowe, Jonson, Drayton, Daniel, Donne, Marvell, Webster, Marston, Middleton, Ford, Chapman, and Milton are studied in the light of 1) modern critical and scholarly approaches to Renaissance themes and styles, 2) literary manifestations of Neoplatonism, Neostoicism, and political theory, and 3) parallels with developments in the graphic arts (emblem literature, visualized mythology, and the movement toward mannerist and baroque forms). Although the seminar concentrates on a select number of texts, it also provides an overview of the English literary Renaissance and its connections with the continental Renaissance. In short, the seminar serves as both a general grounding in and a specialized study of a major literary period.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 635  Metaphysical Poetry

    Description:
    A survey of the major English poets called "metaphysical" in their historical context: Donne, Herbert, Vaughan, Crashaw, Marvell.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 637  Milton

    Description:
    A study of the poetry and major prose, with particular attention to Paradise Lost; Milton's style, his relations to traditional literary forms, his thematic concerns; an examination of Milton criticism.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 639  Jane Austen: Novels and Cultural Contexts

    Description:
    Why would a novelist from Regency England, who saw Napoleon's rise to power and his defeat, who worried about the fate of military men, unmarried women, and social hypocrisy, and yet who confined her plots as much as possible to small villages and small matters, continue to enrich us imaginatively while focusing on the minutiae of everyday life? Does her oeuvre cast a retrospective or a prospective glance? Does it hint at better solutions to gender inequities than those we find ourselves engaged in now? This course will explore this and other questions as we work our way through Austen's oeuvre and consider what she was reading in terms of philosophies of mind, sexuality, and cultural critique, and in terms of some of her literary peers.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 640  The Rise of the Novel

    Description:
    This course investigates the invention of a new literary form: the novel. Readings will range from the late seventeenth century to early nineteenth century, including authors such as Behn, Defoe, Fielding, Richardson, Sterne, Inchbald, and Austen and sub-genres such as the sentimental novel and gothic tale. The course will trace developments in the novel's formal structure (such as the narrator), question the goals of the novel (such as "realism"), and connect the novel to cultural practices (such as crime and courtship).   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 641  Studies in Romanticism

    Description:
    This course examines the different literary movements that make up the Romantic Period (generally 1780-1832). It offers a comparative study of canonical Romantic Period writers and those writers who raised other kinds of questions. In so doing, it explores what it was like to live and write in the culture of this period and asks: What are the stresses on literary production, and what are the terms of aesthetic, subjective, and imagistic difference between male and female writers?   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 642  Victorian Literature

    Description:
    Studies in the careers and works of major authors such as Carlyle, Tennyson, Dickens, George Eliot, Ruskin, and Wilde, with brief excursions into the works of others. Major themes include the relations of art and society and the problems of faith and doubt, science, and imagination.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 644  Studies in the Modern British Novel

    Description:
    This course concerns the development of modern fiction in the first half of the twentieth century. It focuses on literary developments that shaped the novels of the period in relation to their social, political, cultural, and intellectual contexts, both in Britain and abroad. Among the influences affecting this body of fiction are the two World Wars, social changes consequent to industrialization, Britain's weakening hold over its empire, and the emergence of international modernisms as new modes of expression and inquiry for literature and other arts.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 645  Modern Poetry

    Description:
    A study of major figures such as Yeats, Eliot, Pound, Williams, Stevens, H.D., Frost, Brooks, Plath, Bishop, Langston Hughes, Ted Hughes, Ginsberg, and currents such as Imagism, surrealism, projectivism, confessionalism, and Beat in modern British and American poetry.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 646  Literature and Society

    Description:
    A study of literature with special reference to its social and historical circumstances and of the theoretical questions raised by such a perspective.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 648  Modernism in Literature

    Description:
    "On or about December 1910," Virginia Woolf wrote, "human nature changed." This course examines the trans-Atlantic modernism(s) that arose in the early twentieth century in response to the epochal shifts that Woolf described. We will read poetry, prose, and theory by American and British modernists such as Woolf, Stein, Joyce, Eliot, Faulkner, Toomer, Lawrence, Williams, H.D., and Hurston in the context of historical, political, social, and scientific changes as well as in the context of the cultural changes-in art, music, film, architecture-that surrounded and influenced their aesthetic projects.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 649  Modern Irish Novel

    Description:
    "What the symbols of the new Irish writers are we cannot tell," Sean O'Faolain observed in 1936: "Perhaps they are not so much symbols as typical characters, significant situations." Using as an essential point of departure (and an occasional point of return) James Joyce's image of the sensitive individual in conflict with the values of repressive Irish society, this course will trace the thematic and the technical developments of the Irish novel during the twentieth century. Focusing on a variety of representative authors and texts, the course will consider the novels with reference to their political, social, cultural, and literary contexts.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 650  Colonial American Literature

    Description:
    This seminar closely examines texts composed by colonial American women and men who - through their writings - tried to understand their contemporaries and themselves during two periods of cultural change: the Puritan 17th century and the revolutionary 18th century. Included are works by such authors as Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, Sarah Kemble Knight, Phillis Wheatley, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and Hector St. John de Crevecoeur.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 651  Nineteenth Century American Literature

    Description:
    The nineteenth century brought unprecedented growth and change to the United States. Industry, immigration, urbanization, the Civil War, social justice movement, the end of slavery, and reconstruction marked the country's move from nascent republic to international power. American writers grappled with these changes as they contributed to the development of a national literature: a literature that would, in Walt Whitman's words, be both transcendent and new. This course will consider both canonized and less familiar texts of the period through a variety of approaches, topics, and themes.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 652  American Romanticism

    Description:
    Primary focus on the major authors of the "American Renaissance" (roughly 1840-1860), with some attention to their antecedents (earlier writers such as Irving and Cooper). Familiarity with famous works such as The Scarlet Letter and Walden will be assumed at the outset, and such texts will be considered from the perspectives provided by other, less-well-known works by the same authors. An attempt will be made to examine the interconnections between these writers, many of whom knew each other personally, and all of them publishing within a very brief period.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 653  Major American Novelists

    Description:
    An in-depth study of two or three American novelists, considered comparatively. Possible authors to be studied include Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, James, Wharton, Chopin, Cather, Dreiser, Faulkner, Hemingway, Ellison, Morrison.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 654  Modern American Fiction

    Description:
    This is a course in the study of significant works of American fiction written in the last century, mostly before WW II. The course discusses major American modernists, such as James, Wharton, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Toomer, Faulkner, Hurston, as well as the critical and cultural contexts in which these works appeared. The focus is on the establishment of American fiction as a major literary form during an era of social flux, economic dislocation, and foreign wars.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 655  The Harlem Renaissance

    Description:
    This seminar will examine some of the major literary works of the Harlem Renaissance (also known as the New Negro movement), which flourished between the end of the World War I and the 1929 stock market crash. We will consider how the texts interact with one another thematically, politically, and aesthetically; how architects of the movement defined the New Negro and her/his are; and how contemporary critics have reconstructed the Harlem Renaissance as a major American literary period. Through the study of African-American modernism, this seminar will explore its larger implications for literary studies: the role of literature and other cultural expressions in realizing and representing imagined communities, in resisting and reinforcing political and social discourses, and in reflecting its own potentials and limitations in defining a social self. Authors will include W.E.B Du Bois, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Nella Larsen, and Claude Mckay.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 656  Contemporary American Fiction

    Description:
    A study of the scope (times and types) and strains (types and tensions) in the post-World War II, postmodern American novel, with special attention to the persistence of realism, the insistent presence of surrealism, and the occasional combination of the two.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 657  The Black Presence

    Description:
    Study of selected literary texts of the last two hundred years by major and minor authors who wrote with a special consciousness of the significance of black people in American society.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 659  Women in Literature

    Description:
    A lecture course on the principles of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Topics include: fundamentals of thermodynamics, first and second laws, thermodynamic potentials, phase transitions, classic kinetic theory, classical statistical mechanics, and quantum statistical mechanics. Applications of the principles will be made to physical, chemical, and biological systems of special or current interest. Through reading fiction by American authors from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries, we will attempt to identify the characteristics of female characters and to understand the historical, ideological and aesthetic reasons for both the persistence and modification of the underlying images. The influence of gender, ethnicity, geographical setting, and major literary movements such as romanticism and realism will be examined. Short stories by such authors as Washington Irving, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Henry James, Sarah Orne Jewett, Alice Cary, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Alice Walker will be studied first to establish the range and variety of images. Following these, we study novels by such authors as Rowson, Hawthorne, Stowe, James, Wharton, Cather, Roth, Hurston, and Morrison. Some basic acquaintance with American literature is assumed.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 661  Native American Literature

    Description:
    This graduate course examines some of the ways in which Native American writers express their cultural traditions through literature. Readings include contemporary fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, as well as traditional stories and songs. Special attention is given to how these texts help us to better understand and explain the relationships between human beings and the natural world in Native American cultures, including concepts of power, systems of tribal thought and ethics, and culturally based ways of knowing. Problems in cross-cultural understanding, the complex roles of race and ethnicity in defining identity, and competing issues of cultural adaptation, cultural accommodation, and cultural appropriation, are addressed throughout the course. Gender and class, elements closely connected to race and culture, are also frequent topics of discussion.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 663  Revolutionary Romanticism

    Description:
    Who were the really revolutionary thinkers and writers in the "Age of Revolution," as the Romantic Period is also known? To consider this questions, this course will understand revolution in the sense of a "family affair." The Family unit was an operative ideological concept for very different kinds of revolutions, from the politics of liberation to the feminist revolution in education and social practices. Orienting this affair will be what we can call "the First Family" of revolutionary thought, which is not that of the French king and his famous queen Marie Antoinette, nor that of the mad George III and his politically rebellious son, later George IV, but that of the Godwin-Shelley Circle. The primary members of this circle are William Godwin, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley and Percy Bysshe Shelley (who came to study at Godwin's feet and instead eloped with his daughter). Behind his family romance of "free love," revolution, and theories of education lie the political thought of highly influential figures such as Rousseau, and the feminist politics of care, a contribution to the enduring problem of ethical action (best articulated for the Romantics by Spinoza). Both revolution and care as ethical action struggle against the increasingly dominant ideology of the aesthetic for this family that combines and traverses the standard period division into "first generation" and "second generation" Romantics. As we read our primary writers, we will bring in other thinkers and materials to provide both historical and literary contexts, genre contrasts, and contemporary interventions in these dramatic and self-dramatizing issues.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 664  Transatlantic Approaches to Literature

    Description:
    This course studies the ways in which a transatlantic approach to Anglophone writing can reshape our picture of literary history and generate new theoretical models for the study of print culture. Participants will be invited to test influential accounts of the Atlantic world by reading classic British and American texts as well as lesser-known works. The course attends to transnational concerns such as labor, commerce, epidemiology, and the environment, and to the related phenomena of colonialism, slavery, economic expansion, and missionary activity, as well as the resistance to them.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 665  Literature of the Americas

    Description:
    This course aims to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between twentieth-century U.S. and Latin American literature. The course focuses on U.S. literary modernism between the two world wars and the Latin American boom literatures of the 1950s and the 1960s. Students will not simply compare and contrast each of these literatures in order to mark the similarities between them, but rather to determine why these literary traditions should be examined together in the first place. By examining authors such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez and William Faulkner, students will explore how neither U.S. modernism nor the Latin American boom novel can be understood on its own, and that the full significance of each emerges only in relation to the other.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 667  Seminar for Tutors

    Description:
    This course teaches graduate students to tutor undergraduate students who are taking Freshman English 101 and 102 at UMass Boston. It features readings, writing, and discussion on the theoretical and practical issues one encounters in working as a composition tutor. Tutors learn to apply research about tutoring to the specific context of the undergraduate classroom, learning not only about tutoring goals and practices, but also about the UMass Boston Freshman English programs philosophy and the UMass Boston undergraduate experience. This knowledge provides a foundation for further teaching at UMass Boston. All elements of the course combine to provide an intellectual framework for articulation and synthesis of, as well as reflection on, what is learned in the work experience of the tutor.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 668  Perspectives on Composition: History, Theory, Pedagogy

    Description:
    This course is designed as an introduction to the field of composition studies for students in the composition and literature concentrations alike. We will investigate the rise of English as a discipline in the nineteenth century with a focus on why writing instruction became concentrated in the freshman year. Understanding this history and politics will put us in the position of developing an informed critique of freshman question: what are the alternatives?   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 669  Writing Theories in Second Language Instruction

    Description:
    This course will consider the key issues in writing theory, research, and pedagogy as they are specifically related to writing in a second language. It will introduce students to the existing research and developing theories on the composing process and examine, critique, and evaluate current and traditional theories and practices by exploring the ways in which theory and research can be translated into instruction.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 670  Philosophy and the Composing Process

    Description:
    Current rhetorical theory emphasizing the process of composing has developed several models (e.g., pre-writing, writing, re-writing) which are nevertheless linear. But writers and teachers of writing need ways of apprehending the all-at-onceness of composition. This seminar offers opportunities to develop philosophical perspectives on perception and forming; language and the making of meaning; interpretation in reading and teaching. The course explores the pedagogical and practical implications of a broad range of theories of language and knowing by means of experimental writing and by the study of essays, letters, talks, and other materials by scientists, artists, and philosophers. This course is recommended for students choosing to concentrate in composition for the English MA, at or near the start of their programs.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 672  Research in Writing Studies

    Description:
    This graduate seminar explores the ways that composition and rhetoric scholars make and support knowledge claims by investigating both research in the discipline and the methods and methodologies that undergird that research. Geared towards helping students generate research projects through an informed framing of inquiry, this course provides an introduction to epistemology in writing studies-an introduction that provides a framework for understanding how writing is and has been studied. This focus on knowledge-making is operationalized through a range of methods for conducting research on writing. Students will learn to critically read research publications in composition and rhetoric; they will also learn to develop and pursue their own research projects.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 673  Digital Writing

    Description:
    As writing increasingly moves from the printed page to the screen and beyond, writers have at their disposal a fuller range of expressive modes and means of communication, including but not limited to linear alphabetic text. This workshop/studio course invites students to explore these possibilities by experimenting with their writing in digital platforms. Students engage born-digital texts alongside of traditional print-based genres and consider the relationship between written, audio-visual and/or interactive modes. Classes include craft-based discussions, peer critiques, and hands-on instruction in media production software, which prepare students to produce their own creative digital texts through a series of independent writing projects. This course welcomes students from all backgrounds; no specialized technical skills are expected or required.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 675  Reading and Writing Poetry

    Description:
    This is a graduate poetry workshop for both experienced writers and students with little poetry-writing experience. For more experienced writers, the concentration is on developing skills, with a chance to extend range by studying great poems in form and in free verse. For students newer to writing poetry, or students who simply wish to learn more about poetry, this is a chance to develop your skills from the inside, through studying poems by accomplished poets in various forms, including free verse, and through the actual practice of writing in these forms. The main work of the semester is writing poems, but there are assignments requiring a critical response to other poets.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 676  Reading and Writing Fiction

    Description:
    This is a graduate fiction workshop for both experienced writers and students with little fiction-writing experience. For more experienced writers, the concentration is on developing skills, with a chance to extend range by studying writers like Mary Gaitskill, Denis Johnson, Geoff Dyer, Lorrie Moore, Steven Millhauser, and Chuck Palahniuk. Fiction-writing assignments are connected to reading assignments.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 680  Art of Literary Translation

    Description:
    This graduate seminar examines literary translation and interpretation, concentrating on both poetry and prose. Translators can be viewed as artists working between one language and another, recreating texts. The course will focus on the practice, theory, and craft of literary translation, with particular attention given to close reading interpretation. Students will produce translations of texts of their own choice. Knowledge of second language is recommended, but not required to take the course. Students without knowledge of a second language will have the opportunity to produce translations of texts written in middle or old English, or in dialect of English. Readings will include classic and recent essays on translation theory, as well as excerpts from a selection of variant sample translations. Attention will also be given to how the practice of translation has influenced the work of many well-known writers, from Elizabeth Bishop, Seamus Heaney and W. S. Merwin to Robert Pinsky and H. D. Without translation, a critical activity that connects otherwise separate languages and cultures, readers and writers would be left in relative isolation, unaware of wider trends in world literature. With thousands of languages used worldwide, all of us, even multilingual readers, are ultimately dependent on the work of translators to read more widely. Translation is a fascinating area of study that presents stimulating possibilities for creative writers.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 681  Advanced Workshop in Poetry

    Description:
    An advanced poetry workshop in which students practice and improve the poetic skills they have already begun to develop by focusing on a pre-approved project for the semester. Class discussion focuses on student work, and individual conferences with the instructor are required. This course may be repeated twice for credit.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 682  Advanced Workshop in Fiction

    Description:
    An advanced fiction workshop in which students improve the writing skills they have already begun to develop by focusing on a pre-approved project for the semester. All students read contemporary fiction throughout the semester. Class discussion focuses on student work, and individual conferences with the instructor are required. This course may be repeated twice for credit.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 683  Literary Sites and Spaces

    Description:
    This course will engage students in literary field work, encouraging experiential learning at libraries, museums, archives, and writers homes and communities. The course creates opportunities for students to explore what happens when a literary text is connected to a literary site, including spaces of literary inspiration, production, reading, and preservation. Each course meeting will feature on-site learned in a literary space, with field trips, workshops, and assignments designed to give the group unique insights into the interpretive possibilities created by field-based research. By working outside of the classroom, students will place literature in new social and historical contexts, while also testing the latest theoretical understandings of literary history, literary and cultural geography, cultures of the book, and the history of the book.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 688  Final Project in Pedagogy

    Description:
    Provides a structure for students working toward completion of the final exercise (capstone) requirement in pedagogy. A project proposal is required and must be approved by the faculty supervisor of the project and by the Graduate Program Director. Paper plans and drafts are studied and critiqued in regular tutorial conferences with individual faculty supervisors, or examination materials and sample questions are analyzed. The final paper or examination is assessed by graduate faculty readers. Students must successful complete the capstone project in order to receive the MA.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 689  English Studies Workshop

    Description:
    This one credit course meets in evening workshops held at regular intervals (every two weeks). The central goal of the English Studies Workshop is to engage MA students in an understanding of the latest developments in the field of English. The workshop sessions take a variety of forms, typically featuring a presentation led by a faculty member; they also include less traditional experiences, such as visits to area research libraries. The workshops encourage students to have an experiential engagement with Englishs latest research, theoretical, pedagogical, creative, professional, and career trends, while also showing student show those trends inform the MA program.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 690  English Research Workshop

    Description:
    This one credit course meets in evening workshops held at regular intervals (every two weeks). The central goal of the English Research Workshop is to prepare MA students for the final project. Research exercises will move student through the steps needed to create a successful final project, such as :formulating a viable research topic, locating an advisor, understanding research methodology, selecting models of research and writing in professional journals, compiling an annotated bibliography, and creating a research calendar. Students are strongly encouraged to take the English Research workshop in the year or semester before their final project work commences.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 691  Final Project in Composition

    Description:
    This course provides a structure for students working toward completion of the final exercise (capstone) requirement in composition. A project proposal is required and must be approved by the faculty supervisor of the project and by the Graduate Program Director. Paper plans and drafts are studied and critiqued in regular tutorial conferences with individual faculty supervisors, or examination materials and sample questions are analyzed. The final paper or examination is assessed by graduate faculty readers. Students must successfully complete the capstone essay or examination in order to receive the MA.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 692  Final Project in Creative Writing

    Description:
    This course provides a structure for students working toward completion of the final exercise (capstone) requirement in creative writing and supplements work done in creative writing workshops. A project proposal is required and must be approved by the faculty supervisor of the project, by the Director of Creative Writing, and by the Graduate Program Director. Drafts are studied and critiqued in regular tutorial conferences with individual faculty supervisors. The final manuscript is assessed by graduation faculty readers. Students must successfully complete the capstone project in order to receive the MA.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 693  Final Project in Literature

    Description:
    Provides a structure for students working toward completion of the final exercise (capstone) requirement in literature. A project proposal is required and must be approved by the faculty supervisor of the project and by the Graduate Program Director. Paper plans and drafts are studied and critiqued in regular tutorial conferences with individual faculty supervisors, or examination materials and sample questions are analyzed. The final paper or examination is assessed by graduate faculty readers. Students must successfully complete the capstone project in order to receive the MA.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 694  Graduate Internship in English

    Description:
    The Graduate Internship in English allows students to explore possible careers connected to and furthered by the postgraduate study of English. Internships take place within a wide variety of fields that feature an applied use of English, including publishing, marketing, publicity, professional writing, creative writing, library work, and non-profit administration. Internships can include experiences such as organizing rare books materials for a Boston area library, leading literacy workshops for a non-profit organization, or composing publicity materials in a corporate setting. The Graduate Internship affords students the opportunity to bring the ideas and skills learned in English MA courses to the workplace.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 695  Independent Study

    Description:
    A comprehensive study of a particular area of literature, particular author, or specialized topic not offered in regular seminars. Consultation with the director of graduate studies is mandatory. Students arrange a project with a faculty member who approves a project proposal, providing a description or outline of the research and writing work to be undertaken and a bibliography of reading. The project must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. Project proposals must be submitted by the end of the semester previous to the one in which the study is to take place.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 696  Independent Study

    Description:
    A comprehensive study of a particular area of literature, particular author, or specialized topic not offered in regular seminars. Consultation with the director of graduate studies is mandatory. Students arrange a project with a faculty member who approves a project proposal, providing a description or outline of the research and writing work to be undertaken and a bibliography of reading. The project must be approved by the Graduate Program Director. Project proposals must be submitted by the end of the semester previous to the one in which the study is to take place.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 697  Special Topics in Literature and Composition

    Description:
    Experimental new graduate seminars on special subjects are frequently offered under this heading and are announced each semester prior to the advance pre-registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 698  Intern Seminar

    Description:
    This seminar is for both composition and literature interns during their intern semester. It involves a preliminary summer workshop and weekly meetings and classroom visits during the semester. The course is team-taught by the two internship supervisors, with students divided into a composition and a literature section according to their intern appointment. The seminar develops more fully the pedagogical and content material covered in ENGL 610 and 611. It involves collaborative work (particularly in designing a joint syllabus, reading list, and assignments for the undergraduate composition and literature sections to be taught by interns), classroom research, and reflective reports.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 699  Master of Art Thesis

    Description:
    A substantial project of approximately 60 pages in literature, composition, or creative writing. Creative writing students will include a related analytical paper with their manuscript. A thesis proposal is required and must be approved by the student's faculty supervisor of the thesis and by the Graduate Program Director. In the case of creative writing theses, approval by the Director of Creative Writing is also required. The student works under the supervision of a faculty thesis director in regular tutorial conferences. Students should begin working on their project a full semester before the semester in which the project is due. The thesis will be read by a committee of three graduate faculty members who will judge its suitability as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Master of Arts degree. Finally, a thesis defense before the student's committee and open to all members of the English Department will take place.   More Info

    Offered in: