Academics

Course Catalog

GRAD > PSYCLN

Psychology Clinical

  • PSYCLN 601  Assessment and Testing I

    Description:
    As part one of a two-semester foundations course on diagnostic testing and assessment, this course trains students to administer, score, and interpret tests of cognitive and intellectual functioning. Issues pertaining to test construction and the standards and ethics of psychological testing provide the context for assessment training. In addition, students learn to conduct an assessment interview and are encouraged to articulate for themselves a philosophy of testing. Special attention is given to the issue of cultural bias in standard psychological tests.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 602  Assessment and Testing II (Personality Assesment)

    Description:
    This course, a continuation of PSYCH 601, is part two of the clinical diagnostic testing and assessment sequence. It instructs students on the administration, scoring, and interpretation of objective and projective tests that assess the personality and the social/emotional functioning of children, adolescents, and adults. Emphasis is placed on the integration of cognitive, intellectual, and personality test data in presenting a comprehensive and culturally congruent assessment of individuals.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 610  Culture and Mental Health

    Description:
    This course focuses on three issues: 1) the role of culture in the development of psychological health and psychopathology; 2) variations across cultures in defining and understanding mental health and deviant behavior; and 3) the importance of cultural context in constructing ways to prevent and/or ameliorate psychological problems. Emphasis is placed on the social-cultural contexts of United States minority groups and on what such contexts imply for mental health policy and intervention strategies.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 611  Developmental Psychopathology I

    Description:
    The first course in a two-semester sequence focusing on the development of psychopathology across the life span, this course introduces students to the field of childhood psychological disorders, their etiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and treatment. It examines biological, normative developmental, familial, and sociocultural factors involved in childhood symptomatology.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 612  Developmental Psychopathology II

    Description:
    This course focuses on psychological problems and disorders that typically manifest themselves during adolescence or early or later adulthood. Adult disorders are examined from biological, psychological, and sociocultural perspectives. Students become familiar with the major syndromes classified in DSM-IV. This course is a continuation of PSYCH 611.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 613  Lifespan Psychopathology

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to some of the prevalent theories, empirical research, and diagnostic issues in psychopathology spanning from infancy to late adulthood.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 614  Forensic Psychology

    Description:
    This course examines the intersection of criminal law and clinical psychology. Topics include those that are frequently the concern of forensic mental health clinicians, namely recidivism, violence risk assessment, insanity, legal competence, and false memory. These topics are studied from cultural and developmental (childhood, adolescence, adult) perspectives.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 620  Intervention Strategies

    Description:
    An introduction to effective, health-promoting psychotherapeutic interventions designed to address a wide range of clinical and developmental problems. Greatest attention is paid to the theory and practice of individual psychotherapy with adults, although therapeutic interventions with children and adolescents and with families are also introduced. The course adopts an integrative approach to psychotherapy, an approach that combines aspects of interpersonal psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive-behavioral, and family systems perspectives.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 628  Trauma: Psychological Response and Recovery

    Description:
    This course examines the psychological and biological consequences of trauma by integrating theoretical, research, and clinical material from several disciplines. Students become familiar with the prevailing theoretical models in the field; with common features of the aftermath of different forms of trauma; with the neurobiological consequences of trauma; and with the methods of treatment that have evolved from the field's expanding empirical base. Developmental issues are given special consideration with a particular focus on childhood abuse. The course also focuses on historical and current sociocultural issues that comprise the context of trauma and its aftermath, both personal and collective.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 641  Cognitive and Affective Bases of Behavior: Life Span Development I

    Description:
    This is part one of a two-semester course sequence. The aim of part one is to provide a broad perspective on a number of themes that are of enduring importance throughout the life cycle and thus merit special attention. The themes have been selected for the significance they hold for the study of normal as well as atypical development. They provide us with a vantage point from which to consider some of the prerequisites for normal development, and they set the stage for a discussion of mental health and of problem prevention, atypical mental development, psychopathology, and remedial intervention.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 642  Social and Cultural Bases of Behavior: Life Span Development II

    Description:
    This course, a continuation of PSYCLN 641, introduces students to sociological and anthropological perspectives on human development across the life span. A major focus is on "points of transition" in the human life cycle, with special emphasis on phases of adolescent and adult human development.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 660  Physiological Psychology

    Description:
    This course, designed for students in the Critical and Creative Thinking program, provides an overview of basic concepts in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, and neurochemistry, with particular emphasis on recent developments in these areas that are of particular relevance to clinical psychology. The course also emphasizes the basic assumptions and limitations of the techniques utilized to investigate brain-behavior relationships.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 662  Psychopharmacology

    Description:
    The aims of this course are threefold: 1) to understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of action of psychoactive drugs, 2) to understand the facts and theories underlying the use of drugs in the treatment of neurobehavioral ("mental") and neurological disorders, and 3) to understand the processes of addiction and the properties of drugs of use/abuse. The course focuses first on the fundamental aspects of neurochemical activity in the brains of normal individuals, then on each of the major neurotransmitters, related neurological diseases and/or "mental" disorders, and the major drugs that act on each particular neurotransmitter system. The student should gain 1) an understanding of why pharmacological approaches to therapy are used, how they work, and relevant side effects, and 2) an understanding of the pharmacodynamics of substances of abuse. For the clinician, this understanding should permit informed management of future clients who are dependent on the use of psychoactive compounds.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 670  Advanced Statistics

    Description:
    This course instructs students in advanced statistical topics and provides training in the use of the corresponding computer methods. The course emphasizes the statistical methods of most general interest and importance to social scientists: multiple regression analysis and analysis of variance.   More Info

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  • PSYCLN 675  Research Methods and Ethics in Clinical Psychology

    Description:
    The goal of this course is to provide you with the expertise necessary (a) to evaluate the adequacy of published research and to draw your own conclusions from existing empirical findings, (b) to generate logical, novel hypotheses based on theories, observations, and prior empirical results about psychopathology and psychotherapy, (c) to create valid experimental and descriptive studies and use other designs and methodologies to test those hypotheses, and (d) to learn to consider and apply ethical principles to clinical research. Attention will also be paid to non-hypothesis-driven empirical methods although the qualitative methods course will be necessary in order to develop expertise in this area.   More Info

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  • PSYCLN 680  History and Systems

    Description:
    This course explores the theoretical and methodological problems of contemporary psychology from a historical perspective. It provides a broad overview of psychology's development as an independent discipline, and of the development of the various sub-specialties in the field. By examining intellectual antecedents and underlying assumptions, the course seeks to evaluate the significance of new movements and methods.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 690  Introduction to Clinical Outreach and Intervention Practicum

    Description:
    This course will introduce students to the development of outreach and intervention skills through participation in on-campus initiatives for undergraduates. Students will complete readings on college mental health issues, needs assessment, mental health stigma, cultural and ethical considerations in outreach and intervention, and other topics relevant to specific outreach activities. The primary focus of the course will be participating in clinical outreach and intervention activities to provide services on campus including needs assessments with specific groups, providing psychoeducation on specific topics, running support groups, or providing other prevention or intervention services. Group supervision will include applying readings to practice, exploring barriers to care provision, ethical considerations, use of supervision, and developing new outreach and intervention projects.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 691  Clinical Research Practicum I

    Description:
    This fall course provides students with individualized clinical training experiences inherently related to research activities. Such experiences will be developed and supervised by faculty (and their affiliated colleagues) who are engaged in clinical research or outreach activities as part of their broader scholarship activities. Activities may include conduction psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; providing therapeutic interventions; or engaging in outreach, prevention, consultation, or supervision related to clinical activities. These courses are only appropriate when students are engaged indirect assessment, intervention, or outreach with research participants. These courses are not appropriate for students who are engaged in research activities that do not involve direct clinical contact hours or for students engaged in clinical activities that are not explicitly in the context or research. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, scope of clinical work, and amount of supervision.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 692  Clinical Research Practicum II

    Description:
    This spring course provides students with individualized clinical training experiences inherently related to research activities. Such experiences will be developed and supervised by faculty (and their affiliated colleagues) who are engaged in clinical research or outreach activities as part of their boarder scholarship activities. Activities may include conduction psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; providing therapeutic interventions; or engaging in outreach, prevention, consultation, or supervision related to clinical activities. These courses are only appropriate when students are engaged in direct assessment, intervention, or outreach with research participants. These courses are not appropriate for students who are engaged in research activities that do not involve direct clinical contact hours or for students engaged in clinical activities that are not explicitly in the context of research. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, scope of clinical work, and amount of supervision.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 697  Special Topics

    Description:
    This advanced course offers intensive study of a selected topic in Psychology Clinical. Course content varies according to the topic and will be announced prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 698  Master's Research

    Description:
    Students are given individual supervision in research by a member of the psychology department faculty or faculty in related fields and attend a master's research seminar. Each student is helped to design and carry out an original master's thesis using an appropriate methodology. Both courses must be taken, for a total of six credits. The six credits are awarded to the student when the thesis is approved.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 699  Master's Research Seminar

    Description:
    Students are given individual supervision in research by a member of the psychology department faculty or faculty in related fields and attend a master's research seminar. Each student is helped to design and carry out an original master's thesis using an appropriate methodology. Both courses must be taken, for a total of six credits. The six credits are awarded to the student when the thesis is approved.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 701  Neuropsychological Assessment

    Description:
    This course emphasized the neuropsychological assessment of adult brain dysfunction. It presents neuropsychological models of memory, attention,language, perception, and emotion, in relation to various adult brain disorders. Student learn to apply clinical neuropsychological tests and procedures for both descriptive and diagnostic purposes. They complete various learning modules that emphasize neuropsychology across the life span, beginning with developmental neuropsychology and culminating in geriatric neuropsychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 710  Child Assessment

    Description:
    This course provides an overview of psychological assessment of children and adolescents, combining didactic training in various approaches to social development and psychological assessment with practical hands-on training in several instruments routinely employed in traditional child psychological assessment batteries. Tests to be covered span the domains of cognitive functioning, language, academic achievement, neuropsychological functions, adaptive behavior, and social-emotional/personality functioning. They include both structured and semi-structured methods. Participants become familiar with the procedures for administering, scoring, and interpreting such instruments as the Mullen Scales of Early Learning, the Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, the Wechsler Individual Achievement Test (WIAT), and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 720  Family Systems and Family Therapy

    Description:
    The course builds on the introduction to family therapy provided by PSYCH 620. It focuses on the historical and conceptual background of family therapy; the major theoretical models and key concepts guiding practitioners in the field; current research findings regarding the effectiveness of family interventions; contemporary critiques of family theory and therapy; and assessments of the appropriateness of various family therapy models for low income, ethnic minority, and immigrant families. Through videotapes and clinical case material, students are exposed to the work of some of the major family therapists practicing today.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 721  Child Therapy

    Description:
    Child Therapy provides an introduction to theoretical perspectives, empirically tested interventions, and therapy technique that are relevant for children. Students will gain general skills for working with children and parents in clinical settings and learn specific techniques for psychosocial interventions with children who are experiencing difficulties across multiple domains of functioning. Empirically supported treatment programs for children and families will be examined. Approaches for tailoring treatment goals and methods to fit the specific lifestyle needs of families will be discussed. It is hoped that students will begin to develop specific skills necessary for the individual and team-oriented practice of child clinical psychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 722  Developmental perspectives on infant-parent mental health

    Description:
    The course focuses on issues and theories of infants and young childrens mental health. It will interweave theory and practice. Students will come to understand critical domains of infant mental health, including normative and pathological manifestations of infant social and behavioral problems, dysregulation, sensory and motor processes, cognition as well as adult issues, such as attachment history, trauma and personality disorders and the role of culture as the affect young childrens mental health. Students will become familiar with current theories and associated treatments for early mental health problems including psychodynamic, cognitive, mentalizing, relational, sensory integration, and mindfulness. The course will include evaluation of clinical case material and treatment techniques. Common early forms of mental health problems, such as anxiety disorders, attachment and relationship problems, autism spectrum disorder, post partum affective disorders, adoption, problems, of arousal and trauma of children and caretakers will be presented. Student will be introduced to the diagnostic techniques for infants and children.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 726  Cognitive Behavioral Theory and Therapy

    Description:
    This course will enhance students' theoretical, empirical, and practical understanding of cognitive, behavioral, and cognitive/behavioral approaches to psychological and behavioral change. Approximately half the class will be devoted to obtaining sufficient familiarity with theories and research in this area to be able to appraise current research critically and, most importantly, to be able to develop a well-thought-out, individualized treatment plan for a range of presenting problems. The other half of the class will be devoted to obtaining practical skills in a range of cognitive/behavioral strategies (e.g., progressive muscle relaxation, systematic desensitization, cognitive restructuring, direct therapeutic exposure).   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 727  Emotion-Focused Psychotherapy

    Description:
    This course will introduce emotion-focused psychotherapy theory and skills to students. This empirically validated approach falls under the rubric of Humanistic Psychotherapy. It stems from client-centered and gestalt philosophies and theories of development. The mechanism of change in this approach to therapy lies within the re-structuring of clients' emotional schemes and relational patterns. Close attention is paid to the negotiation of the therapeutic alliance, particularly in relation to self-interruptive or defensive moments when clients back away from important or threatening issues. It teaches specific interventions such as focusing, gestalt chairwork, evocative unfolding, and problematic reaction point exercises. The weekly format of the course will entail one hour of lecture and two hours of supervised exercises and discussion. The course will relate the application of this psychotherapy to both individual adult and couples treatment.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 742  Social Construction of Self and Identities

    Description:
    A broad exploration of self and identities from constructivist and social constructivist views. This course provides an overview of constructivist and social constructionist theory in clinical psychology and addresses the general question of the nature of self and identities, how self and identities develop, and how social contexts and constructions (including power) influence the perception and construction of self and identities. It will then explore in more depth specific identities/topics chosen by students (e.g., racial identities; gender identities; identities in relation to sexual orientation; class identities; identity in relation to ability/disability; identity related to trauma).   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 770  Causal Modeling

    Description:
    This course is designed for students who have had a previous course covering analysis of variance and multiple regression. It will equip students with the skills and analytic background to use a variety of multivariate statistical techniques, including discriminant function analysis, factor analysis, logistic regression and multivariate analysis of variance. In addition, a substantial portion of the course will be devoted to covering structural equation modeling, a procedure used increasingly in the social science today. Extensive computer training is included.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 775  Qualitative Methods in Clinical Psychology

    Description:
    This course introduces students to qualitative methods used in psychological research. Students will be exposed to the philosophies and foundations of qualitative methodology and the ways in which qualitative and quantitative methods are similar, different, and complementary to each other and to quantitative methods. The course will survey the various qualitative methodologies used in the field of psychology, addressing issues of question formation, data collection, validity, data analysis, and interpretation. Students will participate in a qualitative research project that will help them develop skills in collection, managing, analyzing, and interpreting qualitative data.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 781  Assessment Practicum I

    Description:
    This fall practicum course will provide students with a variety of clinical assessment training experiences that meet specific assessment requirements related to internship preparation (e.g., administering assessments, writing integrated assessment reports, providing testing feedback). Students will develop an assessment plan based on client need; conduct psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; interpret and integrate assessment findings within the client's cultural context; provide clinically thoughtful, culturally-sensitive feedback, along with clinical recommendations and referrals; write integrative assessment reports; and learn, understand, and abide by the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology. Individualized readings will be based on specific assessments being conducted. Group supervision through discussion will focus on consultation and group supervision, including ethical and cultural considerations of assessments. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical assessment activities, amount of supervision, and number of clinical hours to be completed.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 782  Assessment Practicum II

    Description:
    This spring practicum course will provide students with a variety of clinical assessment training experiences that meet specific assessment requirements related to internship preparation (e.g., administering assessments, writing integrated assessment reports, providing testing feedback). Students will develop an assessment plan based on client need; conduct psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; interpret and integrate assessment findings within the client's cultural context; provide clinically thoughtful, culturally-sensitive feedback, along with clinical recommendations and referrals; write integrative assessment reports; and learn, understand, and abide by the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology. Individualized readings will be based on specific assessments being conducted. Group supervision through discussion will focus on consultation and group supervision, including ethical and cultural considerations of assessments. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical assessment activities, amount of supervision, and number of clinical hours to be completed.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 783  Advanced Clinical Research Practicum I

    Description:
    This fall course provides advanced students with individualized clinical training experiences inherently related to research activities. Such experiences will be developed and supervised by faculty (and their affiliated colleagues) who are engaged in clinical research or outreach activities as part of their broader scholarship activities. Activities may include conducting psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; providing therapeutic intervention; or engaging in outreach, prevention, consultation, or supervision related to clinical activities. These courses are only appropriate when students are engaged in direct assessment, intervention, or outreach with research participants. These courses are not appropriate for students who are engaged in research activities that do not involve direct clinical contact hours or for students engaged in clinical activities that re not explicitly in the context of research. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, scope of clinical work, and amount of supervision.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 784  Advanced Clinical Research Practicum II

    Description:
    This spring course provides advanced students with individualized clinical training experiences inherently related to research activities. Such experiences will be developed and supervised by faculty (and their affiliated colleagues) who are engaged in clinical research or outreach activities as part of their broader scholarship activities. Activities may include conduction psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; providing therapeutic interventions; or engaging in outreach, prevention, consultation, or supervision related to clinical activities. These courses are only appropriate when students are engaged in direct assessment, intervention, or outreach with research participants. These courses are not appropriate for students who are engaged in research activities that do not involve direct clinical contact hours or for students engaged in clinical activities that are not explicitly in the context of research. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, scope of clinical work, and amount of supervision.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 785  Practicum and Ethics I

    Description:
    This course will provide students with intensive clinical training through a practicum placement at the University Health Service's Counseling Center. To support this training, students will participate in weekly individual and group supervision, a didactic weekly seminar, and a monthly peer support group. Over the course of the semester, students are expected to learn how to: conduct assessments, provide therapeutic intervention, conceptualize cases, apply a multicultural framework to clinical interaction, effectively use supervision, comply with the administrative requirements of the Counseling Center, and learn, understand, and abide by the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 786  Practicum and Ethics II

    Description:
    This course will provide students with intensive clinical training through a practicum placement at the University Health Services Counseling Center. To support this training, students will participate in weekly individual, group, and peer supervision, a didactic weekly seminar, and a monthly peer support group. Over the course of the semester, students are expected to learn how to: conduct assessments, provide therapeutic interventions, conceptualize cases, apply a multicultural framework to clinical interactions, effectively use supervision, comply with the administrative requirement of the Counseling Center, and learn, understand, and abide by the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 787  Practicum III

    Description:
    This course will provide students with intensive clinical training through a practicum placement at the University Health Services Counseling Center. To support this training, students will participate in weekly individual, group, and peer supervision, a didactic weekly seminar, and a monthly peer support group. Over the course of the semester, students are expected to learn how to: conduct assessments, provide therapeutic interventions, conceptualize cases, apply a multicultural framework to clinical interactions, effectively use supervision, comply with the administrative requirement of the Counseling Center, and learn, understand, and abide by the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 788  Practicum IV

    Description:
    This course will provide students with intensive clinical training through a practicum placement at the University Health Services Counseling Center. To support this training, students will participate in weekly individual, group, and peer supervision, a didactic weekly seminar, and a monthly peer support group. Over the course of the semester, students are expected to learn how to: conduct assessments, provide therapeutic interventions, conceptualize cases, apply a multicultural framework to clinical interactions, effectively use supervision, comply with the administrative requirement of the Counseling Center, and learn, understand, and abide by the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 791  Advanced Clinical Outreach, Intervention, and Consultation Practicum I

    Description:
    This fall course offers advanced supervised individualized practicum experiences, primarily on campus but sometimes at associated community settings. Interventions, outreach, and consultations will be offered by students in this practicum to the individual and organizational members of the University community. This practicum course will provide students with a variety of clinical outreach, intervention, and consultation experiences, with an emphasis on providing culturally responsive services that are sensitive to contextual factors and promote health and well-being. Students will complete individualized readings to support the clinical services they are providing. The primary focus of the course will be participating in clinical outreach and intervention activities to provide services on campus. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, amount of supervision, and number of clinical hours to be completed. Group supervision through class discussion will involve consultation, peer supervision, and integration of clinical experiences, with attention to ethical and cultural considerations, to promote professional development as a clinical psychologist.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 792  Advanced Clinical Outreach, Intervention, and Consultation Practicum II

    Description:
    This spring course offers advanced supervised individualized practicum experiences, primarily on campus but sometimes at associated community settings. Interventions, outreach, and consultations will be offered by students in this practicum to the individual and organizational members of the University community. This practicum course will provide students with a variety of clinical outreach, intervention, and consultation experiences, with an emphasis on providing culturally responsive services that are sensitive to contextual factors and promote health and well-being. Students will complete individualized readings to support the clinical services they are providing. The primary focus of the course will be participating in clinical outreach and intervention activities to provide services on campus. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, amount of supervision, and number of clinical hours to be completed. Group supervision through class discussion will involve consultation, peer supervision, and integration of clinical experiences, with attention to ethical and cultural considerations, to promote professional development as a clinical psychologist.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 879  Advanced Community Psychology

    Description:
    The objectives of this seminar are to (10 engage students in a critical examination of the theoretical and application issues central to the field of community psychology; and (2) provide opportunities for student to practice formulating their own ideas and hypotheses for use in research and applied work within the framework of community psychology. This seminar is being offered as a diversity elective in the Clinical Psychology PhD program. The course will cover the central principles of the field of community psychology, with an emphasis on how these principles intersect with the field of clinical psychology.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 891  Teaching Seminar

    Description:
    This seminar is required of all fourth-year students who are teaching undergraduate psychology courses. The seminar provides didactic presentations combined with class discussion and supervision on a variety of topics, including pedagogy, techniques for effective teaching, teaching diversity in psychology, writing and delivering lectures, and conceptualizing exams.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 893  Advanced Community Practicum I

    Description:
    This fall course will provide oversight for advanced students completing practica in the community. Students will participate in clinical activities in community settings approved by the Clinical Executive committee (CEC) of the Clinical Psychology graduate program. Activities may include psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; providing therapeutic interventions; conceptualizing cases; applying a multicultural framework to clinical interaction; providing consultation or supervision; participation in prevention, consultation, or supervision; or other approved clinical activities. Students will improve their competencies in clinical skills, effective use of supervision, and comply with the administrative requirements of the Externship site, as well as the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, scope of clinical work, number of practicum hours, and amount of supervision.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 894  Advanced Community Practicum II

    Description:
    This spring course will provide oversight for advanced students completing practica in the community. Students will participate in clinical activities in community settings approved by the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC) of the Clinical Psychology graduate program. Activities may include psychological, neuropsychological, and/or diagnostic assessments; providing the therapeutic interventions; conceptualizing cases; applying a multicultural framework to clinical interactions; providing consultation or supervision; participating in prevention consultation, or supervision; or other approved clinical activities. Students will improve their competencies in clinical skills, effective use of supervision, and comply with the administrative requirements of the Externship site, as well as the ethical principles guiding the practice of psychology. To be eligible for this course, students must obtain written approval from the Clinical Executive Committee (CEC), who will evaluate the clinical activities, scope of clinical work, number of practicum hours, and amount of supervision.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 895  Independent Study

    Description:
    This course involves the comprehensive study of a particular topic in clinical psychology under the direction of a faculty member. An independent study course can fulfill one elective requirement. A detailed proposal must be submitted to the faculty member prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 896  Independent Study

    Description:
    This course involves the comprehensive study of a particular topic in clinical psychology under the direction of a faculty member. An independent study course can fulfill one elective requirement. A detailed proposal must be submitted to the faculty member prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 897  Special Topics in Clinical Psychology

    Description:
    This advanced course offers intensive study of selected topics in clinical psychology. A special topics course can be used to fulfill one area elective requirement (see "Degree Requirements"). Course content varies according to the topic and is announced before registration each time the course is offered.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCLN 898  Internship in Clinical Psychology

    Description:
    Doctoral candidates in clinical psychology are required to complete this one-year full-time predoctoral internship in a setting approved by the American Psychological Association. During the internship, students have a variety of clinical experiences, including assessments and therapeutic interventions. They are closely supervised by mental health professionals, some of whom must be licensed clinical psychologists. A letter from the on-site internship director documenting satisfactory completion must be in the student's file at the University before the degree can be granted.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • PSYCLN 899  Dissertation Research

    Description:
    Research, conducted under supervision of the doctoral committee, leading to the presentation of a doctoral dissertation.   More Info

    Offered in: