Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > AFRSTY

Africana Studies

  • AFRSTY 100  Introduction to African-American Literature

    Description:
    This survey course examines the writings of African-Americans who have made unique contributions to the African-American literary tradition. The course explores these writings in terms of their sociohistorical context, making use of analyses of character, plot, and symbolism. It gives particular attention to the writers' roles as social critics. Among the writers whose work may be considered are Frederick Douglass, Jean Toomer, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, Leroi Jones, Ernest Gaines, George Jackson, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 101  Introduction to Africana Studies

    Description:
    This course presents an overview of the major theories in the field of Africana studies. It seeks to explore the Africana experience in a way that is orderly, systematic, and structurally integrated; and to convey an understanding of the cultural, historical, and political roots of this experience. The course focuses chronologically on major historical episodes through a study of ancient African civilizations, slavery, colonialism, and African liberation movements.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 102  The History of African-American Education

    Description:
    A comparative study of the history of African-American education from earliest times to 1954. (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 108  African-American Social Movements

    Description:
    Concepts of social movements as well as the appearance of social movements among African-Americans in the nineteenth century. Examination of twentieth century African-American social movements, especially Marcus Garvey's movement, the Nation of Islam, the Civil Rights movement, and the Black Power movement. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 110  African-American History I

    Description:
    An intensive study of the social, economic, and political history of African-Americans from the slavery period through the Civil War, with particular emphasis on the social and cultural antecedents of African-Americans, Abolitionism and the Civil War.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 111  African-American History II

    Description:
    An intensive study of the social, economic, and political history of African-Americans from the era of Reconstruction to the present. Topics include the African-American during Reconstruction, racism in America, and a critical examination of the variegated patterns of African-American response to American social conditions in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 115G  Black Consciousness

    Description:
    This course examines the social, economic, cultural and political implications of the development of Black consciousness in twentieth-century United States. It considers the role played in these developments by Ida B Wells, WEB DuBois, Marcus Garvey, the Harlem Renaissance, the Civil Rights/Black Power movement, the Nation of Islam, and the Black Arts Movement. This course may count toward the Africana studies major.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 116  African Civilizations: Historical Perspectives

    Description:
    This course provides a broad survey of the historical processes that have shaped African societies from the earliest traces of human culture to the modern period. Specific attention will be paid to such precolonial African societies as ancient Egypt, Nubia, Mali, Ghana, and Great Zimbabwe among others.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 117  Modern African Historical Perspectives

    Description:
    The course considers a variety of perspective on modern history of Africa beginning from the 19th Century to the present with particular emphasis on African sources and materials. It explores a number of important themes - the Scramble for Africa, colonialism, the fight for independence, the post-colonial era, as well as the many connections between the African continent and the African Diaspora and the impact of current events around the world on people of African descent.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 150  African Images in Literature

    Description:
    This course examines the different ways in which African writers have represented the continent of Africa by focusing on their struggle to develop authentic forms and images. Through the reading of selected folk tales, novels, and poems from different African societies, participants consider such issues as the influence of colonialism on creative writing; the politics of African culture; race and class; the images and status of women.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 201  The Roots of the African-American Family

    Description:
    An exploration of the social, economic, and religious issues affecting the African-American family.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 210  The Making of the African Diaspora

    Description:
    This seminar explores global and transnational experiences; social, political, cultural and economic issues confronting people of African descent in North America, South America, the Caribbean, Europe and Africa from the seventeenth century on. Topics include theory, methods, and historiography of African Diaspora. In addition, this course will introduce student to racial theories or formations such as mestizaje-notions of racial mixing in Brazil and Blanqueamiento-the process of 'whitening' in Spanish speaking nations in South America in efforts to erase the "black" population or presence.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 220  Free and Slave in the New World, 1492-1888

    Description:
    A survey of African-American and Afro-Caribbean societies from the European settlement of the Americas to the abolition of slavery in Brazil. The geographical focus is on Canada, the United States, Mexico, Guyana, Brazil, Cuba, and the English-speaking Caribbean-primarily Trinidad, Jamaica, and Barbados. The course introduces students to the historical debate over the varieties of slave systems.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 225  The Origins of Caribbean Civilizations

    Description:
    This course explores Caribbean society from the Columbian era to the period of emancipation. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, it focuses on the foundations of Caribbean civilizations in the English-, French-, and Spanish-speaking areas of the region. Special emphasis is given to the rise of African communities in the New World. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 230  African-American Women's History

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the major issues in the history of African-American women. Topics include the role of women in pre-colonial Africa, the slave trade, the female experience in slavery, free women, African-American women and religion, and the role of African-American women in the early twentieth century.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 250  The Civil Rights Movement

    Description:
    This course examines the American Civil Rights movement as it developed during the period from 1954 to 1965, and as it changed during the period from 1966 to 1986. The course assesses the roles played by individuals, movements, governments, and political leaders in the process of social change.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 260L  African-American Folklore

    Description:
    This course examines the development and the significance of African-American folklore through study of its various genres: music, tales, legends, shorter verbal forms, material culture, folk belief, and folk humor. Emphasis is given to both African survivals and Indo-European influences in these genres. AFRSTY 260L and AMST 260L are the same course.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 270  The Black Image on Stage and Screen

    Description:
    This course explores the history and development of how Africans and African Americans are depicted on stage, on the movie screen, and in television. Starting in the days of Shakespeare (Othello, Aaron in Titus Andronicus) the course will take a path that includes the days of minstrel shows, Race movies, Magic Negroes, Blacksploitation, The Black Arts Movement, the post-racial age, and on into the images of tomorrow. By the end of the course, students will not only have the knowledge of how racial identities develop through media such as television and motion pictures, but will also be able to view future depictions of blacks and other persons of color on stage with a critical eye to certain stereotypes.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 292G  African Caribbean Literature

    Description:
    This course examines the development and significance of Afro-Caribbean literature in the 20th century. Texts are examined both individually and in relation to each other. Emphasis is given to the development of post-colonial themes and techniques in Caribbean sociocultural contexts, asking what "post-colonial" means to writers of different Caribbean nations. This course may count toward the major or minor in Africana studies. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, academic self assessment, collaborative learning, information technology, oral presentation.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 300L  Women in African Cultures

    Description:
    This course challenges stereotypical constructions of Africa and African woman in mainstream media by considering internal and external historical relationships that have shaped and redefined the cultures, ideas, institutions, politics, and social relations of several specific groups of African women. Through a multi-disciplinary approach, the course addresses issues and challenges of contemporary Africa, and explores many of the themes and concerns that have run throughout Africas gendered, complex, and changing history. Popular culture sources, as well as scholarly studies and activist writing, will be employed to help illuminate the lived experiences and perspectives of contemporary women living in various African societies. AFRSTY 300L and WOST 300L are the same course.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 301  African-American Intellectual Thought

    Description:
    A survey course of the significant writings of African-Americans from the period of Emancipation to the present, with special reference to issues concerning the educational, political, sociological, and psychological status of African-Americans in the United States.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 302  Martin and Malcolm X

    Description:
    An examination of the philosophical and ideological frameworks of Martin Luther King and Malcolm X. Their impact on African-American social movements, on modern American social and political life, and on the Third World is also considered. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 310  Modern Caribbean Society

    Description:
    This course undertakes a phenomenological and interpretive analysis of the organization and social structure of modern Caribbean societies. After a brief examination of the colonization and slavery period, it concentrates on the contemporary era with a special focus on key factors that have shaped the cultural parameters and the internal dynamics of the social systems of these Creolophone, Francophone, Anglophone Hispanophone and Dutch-speaking Caribbean societies. Special attention is therefore given to the salient racial, ethnic, social, political, economic and cultural issues that have significantly influenced and contributed to present day Caribbean societies.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 320  Problems in Urban Education

    Description:
    This course looks at the relationship between young people growing up in the cities and the efforts to reform urban schooling. The course examines the cultural, social, economic, and political dimensions of formal "education" in the city. Questions posed include: What is education? Why educate? Who is educated in the city? What impact does urban education have upon its recipients and their families, culture, community? What is the relationship between urban education and the American social order? (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 326L  Multiracial Experiences

    Description:
    This course explores the experiences of multiracial individuals from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds. We will explore historical and current meanings of race and racialization, including the personal, community, and political implications of racial categorizations, racial purity, and newer ideas of multiraciality and changing boundaries. We will consider racial identities and the negotiation of multiple, complex and contradicting meanings of race and racialization. We will also explore the diverse meanings and experiences of multiracial individuals in specific relation to various racial groups, including White European Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans, and Latinos. Finally, we will consider issues related to community organizing for, by and in relation to multiracial peoples.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 335  African-American Nationalism Before Garvey

    Description:
    This course explores the theme of African-American nationalism and the question of racial identity in the period from the American Revolution to World War I. Topics include the emergence of "back-to-Africa" movements, African-American communities in Canada, resettlement in the French- and English-speaking Caribbean, the African-American response to white colonizers, the establishment of African-American utopian communities, and western migration during Reconstruction.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 343L  African Diaspora Archaeology: Uncovering Roots, Routes, and Resistance

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to African Diaspora archaeology, a burgeoning area of study within the sub-discipline of historical archaeology. Students will explore the concept of diaspora as a means to critically understand the factors underlying the forced dispersal of African people. Participants will consider how archaeological studies of the African diaspora have yielded alternative interpretations of the black past. Throughout the semester, students will examine how archaeologists have investigated the physical and culture landscape, foodways, ritual and religion and objects from everyday life to reveal the ways the black people have resisted and responded to enslavement and other forms of racial oppression. ANTH 343L and AFRSTY 343L are the same course.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 350L  Race, Class, and Gender: Issues in US Diversity

    Description:
    This course deals with the interrelationship of race, class and gender, exploring how they have shaped the experiences of all people in the United States. Focusing on race, class and gender as distinct but interlocking relationships within society, the course examines both the commonalities and the differences that different historical experiences have generated. AFRSTY 350L and AMST 350L are the same course.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 352L  Harlem Renaissance

    Description:
    This course focuses on major texts of the Harlem Renaissance within contexts of modernism, history, and the development of an African American literary tradition. The course will examine how literature creates and represents real and "imagined" communities and will explore the diverse and often contradictory roles that literature plays in shaping, resisting, and reinforcing cultural discourses. AFRSTY 352L and AMST 352L and ENGL 352L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 355L  Black Popular Culture

    Description:
    This course requires students to engage with Black/African diasporic cultural products intended for a mass audience. The macro-contents of American and global consumer capitalism and the micro- categories of ethnicity, gender, and sexualities are used as a framework for the critical analysis of production, consumption, and reception of African American popular culture in the US and abroad. AFRSTY 355L and AMST 355L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 410  African-American Urban Politics

    Description:
    An examination of the dynamics of African-American politics in the urban setting.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 420  Race, Class, and Political Modernization

    Description:
    An exhaustive treatment of the evolution of the American sociopolitical system and the role and function of African people and Third World nationalities within that system. Special attention is given to the interplay between racial oppression and class exploitation as factors in the political process.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • AFRSTY 430  Race and the American Legal System

    Description:
    This course focuses on the historical relationship between race and the American legal system. It examines the social forces and events that precipitated major court decisions and legislative enactments from slavery to the present.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 440  Post-Colonial Literature: Africa and the Caribbean

    Description:
    This course examines contemporary African and Caribbean literature in its historical, cultural, and intellectual context. Emphasis is on the ways different writers have attempted to develop new literary forms in order to create authentic images of their cultures and communities. The course also looks at the continuing influence of colonialism on the literary and social life of these communities. There is no prerequisite, but AFRSTY 290 is strongly recommended.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 478  Independent Study

    Description:
    Students may conduct independent research under the supervision and guidance of members of the faculty. Students wishing to register for independent study must do so through the department.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 479  Independent Study

    Description:
    Students may conduct independent research under the supervision and guidance of members of the faculty. Students wishing to register for independent study must do so through the department.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 480  Topics in Africana Studies

    Description:
    Intensive study of special topics varying each year according to instructor.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 489  Africana Studies Senior Thesis II

    Description:
    Study in depth of a topic chosen by the student in consultation with an honors advisor, and a paper written with the approval and under the direction of an honors advisor, normally related to work done in the honors seminar (AFRSTY 498-499). Honors are awarded on the basis of performance in the honors seminar, evaluation of the paper by the Africana Studies Concentration Committee, and 3.0 overall average.   More Info

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  • AFRSTY 498  Africana Studies Honors Seminar I

    Description:
    An interdisciplinary seminar for students admitted to honors, and to a limited number of other highly qualified students.   More Info

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