Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > AF

Accounting/Finance

  • AF 201  Personal Finance

    Description:
    Introduces students to planning and managing personal and family finances. Topics include insurance and estate planning, relationships with banks, issues in home ownership and real estate, the fundamentals of investing in stocks and bonds, tax planning, leasing as compared with buying automobiles, and financing college education. This course cannot be counted toward the finance or accounting concentration in the College of Management.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 210  Financial Accounting

    Description:
    Presents the theory and techniques of financial accounting. The course encompasses the basic functions of collecting, processing, and reporting accounting information for interested third parties (e.g. owners, investors, and government) and enables students to analyze, interpret, and use accounting information effectively.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 211  Managerial Accounting

    Description:
    Presents the theory and technique of managerial accounting, from the particular perspective of the manager. The course covers the identification and analysis of the behavior of costs within the organization, and illustrates how managers use such knowledge for planning and control. Major topics include responsibility accounting, comprehensive and cash budgeting, standard job order and process cost systems, cost-volume-profit analysis, cost allocation, activity-based costing, standard costs, and variance analysis.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 301  Introduction to Financial Management

    Description:
    Introduces financial management (both short term and long term), specifically what an organization invests in, and how the necessary funds are best raised; the course also acquaints students with various kinds of securities and the operation of financial markets and institutions. Specific topics include ratio analysis, working capital management, financial markets and institutions, the time value of money and capital budgeting, the cost of capital, financial leverage and capital structure, and dividend policy.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 310  Intermediate Accounting I

    Description:
    This is the initial course in the intermediate accounting sequence, to be followed by AF 311. This course provides knowledge of financial accounting theory, with particular emphasis on the application of theory and on the practical problems arising from the limitations of traditional financial statements. It also provides in-depth analysis of the application of generally accepted accounting principles to asset and current liability items. In addition, students learn to research business problems through the use of the Internet; and discuss ethical issues faced by managers.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 311  Intermediate Accounting II

    Description:
    This is the second course in the intermediate accounting sequence. This course continues to develop accounting theory, using principles, concepts, and accounting pronouncements to analyze and resolve accounting issues. Students acquire an understanding of issues unique to corporations and complete the study of the balance sheet by examining long-term debt and equity issues. In addition, they discuss ethical issues faced by managers in today's business world. Continuing emphasis will be placed on computer application skills, research skills and written and oral communication skills. It is recommended that students take AF 301 before AF 311.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 315  Accounting Information Systems

    Description:
    This course examines the design, implementation, operation, and control of contemporary computer-based accounting information systems. Students complete projects which require the use of current information technology to solve real world problems.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 325  Theory of Corporate Finance

    Description:
    Provides a sound understanding of the principles of and analytical techniques used in financial management. The course describes financial decision making by corporations and shows how it can be used to address practical problems and illuminate institutional aspects of the financial world. Topics include review of valuation concepts, cost of capital, advanced capital budgeting, capital structure theories, dividend policy, IPOs, long-term financing and working capital management.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 330  Business Law

    Description:
    Examines the body of law involved in the formation, operation, and termination of business organizations; in contracts; in debtor-creditor relations; in uniform commercial code (sales, commercial paper, secured transactions); in property, estate, and trust; in government regulations; and in issues of CPA liability. Course content encompasses the topics to be found on the CPA law examination.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 335  Investments

    Description:
    Provides the student with an understanding of capital market securities, operations, valuation, and investment techniques. Specifically, the course covers definitions of various investment vehicles, operation of the NYSE and NASDAQ markets, portfolio theory (CAPM and APT), valuation of stocks and bonds, and investor capital allocation decisions, including discussions of mutual fund selection.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 363  Cost Accounting

    Description:
    Examines the design, implementation and operation of cost accounting systems. With primary emphasis on cost analysis in manufacturing, the course explores cost standards, actual performance, and variances. To a lesser extent, it also applies concepts of cost accounting to manufacturing and service organizations.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 410  Advanced Accounting

    Description:
    Develops in depth understanding of financial accounting and reporting in the following areas: business combinations, consolidated financial statements, foreign currency transactions, translation of financial statements of foreign affiliates, reorganization and liquidation, partnerships and other advanced areas. Continues to build on skills acquired from AF 310 and 311 while providing comprehensive treatment of selected topics.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 425  Topics in Corporate Financial Management

    Description:
    Builds on the principles and concepts developed in AF 325 and introduces several new topics including real options, risk management techniques, convertible securities, leasing and mergers and acquisitions. It is recommended that students take AF 335 before AF 425.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 426  Financial Modeling

    Description:
    Introduces the principles and techniques for building financial models, especially in an uncertainty framework. Topics include decision support systems, risk analysis and capital budgeting under uncertainty. Integrates financial, accounting and statistical concepts and techniques to construct financial models and to perform analyses using micro-computer based software.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 433  Accounting for Non-Business Organizations

    Description:
    Develops the specialized knowledge of finance and accounting necessary for the successful financial management of such non-business organizations as governmental agencies, foundations, hospitals, and universities. The course particularly stresses fund accounting as well as the accounting principles appropriate to such organizations.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • AF 435  Derivative Securities

    Description:
    Derivative securities are contracts whose payoffs are derived from the outcome of another security or asset price. This course focuses on the valuation and (mis)use of derivative securities. Specifically the course covers: history of derivatives, valuation of forwards, futures, swap and option contracts and the use of derivative securities to hedge financial risk, particularly interest rate and foreign currency risk. It is recommended that students take AF 335 before 435.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 444  Asset Management Practicum

    Description:
    Students gain hand-on experience analyzing various sectors of the S&P 500 index, prepare financial statements, working in teams, and delivering presentations related to financial markets. Students will be required to perform statistical analysis of data, read financial statements, have basic knowledge of financial markets and investment decision-making, and know fundamentals of macroeconomics. Students should be available to participate in weekly meetings to present updates and recommendations, take part in the preparation of the reconciliation statement at the end of the month and contribute to presentations throughout the semester.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 445  Markets and Financial Institutions

    Description:
    Examines the role of financial markets and institutions in the economy. The course focuses on the working of various financial markets and how financial institutions and other users interact with financial markets. Topics include interest rates; term structure of interest rates; money and capital markets; innovations in capital markets; credit risk and asset and liability management; international financial markets; currency fluctuations; and management of currency risk.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 450  Federal Taxation I

    Description:
    Studies the law and procedures of the federal income taxation of individual taxpayers. The course presents the income tax concepts of gross income recognition, deductions, tax credits, and the effects of property transactions.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 451  Federal Taxation II

    Description:
    Applies the income tax concepts presented in AF 450 to corporations, partnerships, Subchapter S corporations, trusts, and estates. The course introduces the concepts of the federal gift tax and the federal estate tax.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 455  International Financial Management

    Description:
    Provides the student with the knowledge and skills needed by managers in organizations active in international trade, facing foreign competition, or involved in foreign direct investment. The course focuses on the unique international variables and constraints which modify single-country financial management concepts. Topics include the determination of exchange rates, forecasting exchange rates, foreign exchange risk management, transfer pricing policies, multinational capital budgeting with cash flows in more than one currency, international financial markets, and country risk in multinational investment decisions.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 470  Financial Auditing

    Description:
    Encompasses both the theory and the technique of financial auditing. The course examines the professional role of the auditor, along with its operational, ethical, and legal implications. Areas typically covered include professional auditing standards, the auditors' report, specialized reporting issues, auditors' legal responsibilities, gathering and evaluating evidence, the internal control structure audit sampling, and the Code of Professional Conduct. Discussions consider issues of judgment typically faced by auditors in practice.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 475  Real Estate Finance & Investment

    Description:
    Deals with the financing, valuation, and development of real estate investments. The course examines the theoretical The course examines the theoretical and pragmatic models of valuation, the financial structure of successful developments, and the appropriate models of investment choice and portfolio management for real estate investors. It develops an appreciation of the similarities and differences between real and financial assets, and integrates the techniques of real estate analysis with those of corporate finance. Students are expected to participate actively in analyzing real estate investments and developments through case studies and through interaction with executives from the investment, development, and lending communities.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 478  Special Topics in Finance

    Description:
    Addresses a specific topic in accounting or finance. and is offered as one-time supplements to the department's curriculum.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • AF 480  Accounting Internship

    Description:
    Provides students with opportunities for full- or part-time work experience in an accounting or finance setting. On-site supervisors and faculty sponsors provide guidance and supervision for each intern.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 488  Independent Study

    Description:
    A student-initiated research project on a finance topic, supervised by a member of the finance faculty. The course is open to a limited number of students each semester.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 495  Financial Policy

    Description:
    Utilizes the case study method to apply theoretical concepts and techniques learned in previous courses to the analysis of real situations and practical problems in financial management and policy. Some cases will have a strong international focus. This course is intended as a "capstone" course to be taken after all other concentration courses. It provides an opportunity for reviewing, integrating, and putting into practice the skills acquired in previous courses.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 498  College of Management Honors Research Seminar

    Description:
    The CM honors research seminar and thesis program is a two-semester course sequence. This seminar covers research and research methods, and is intended to position students to successfully complete a research project during the second semester. During the first semester, students will work with the program coordinator and later a faculty advisor to define the project. The program is structured around a series of assignments and milestones during which students will work with guidance from a faculty advisor and program coordinator toward a project that meets course goals.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • AF 499  College of Management Honors Thesis Seminar

    Description:
    The CM honors research seminar and thesis Program is a two-semester course sequence. In this seminar, students successfully complete a research while working closely with a faculty advisor to define the project, which builds upon work completed in the per-requisite course, CM Honors Research Seminar. The honors thesis project stretches and grows a student's capabilities. Therefore, the program is structured around a series of assignments and milestones during which students will work with guidance from a faculty advisor and program coordinator toward a project that meets course goals.   More Info

    Offered in: