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UGRD > ANTH

Anthropology

  • ANTH 105  Introduction to Biological Anthropology

    Description:
    The study of human biological evolution and human population variation. This course introduces the history, theory, and methods of research in biological anthropology through lectures and hands-on exercises. Major topics include: geological time, classification, and the place of humans in the animal world; evidence for primate and human evolution; evolutionary theory and genetics; and discussion of the evolutionary forces involved in producing human population variation. This course addresses, in assignments and during class time, the following general education capabilities: critical thinking; using technology to further learning; quantitative reasoning; collaborative work; and effective communication. Students who have taken ANTH 102 may not receive credit for ANTH 105.   More Info

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  • ANTH 106  Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    Description:
    An introduction to the anthropological study of cultures, based on ethnographic descriptions and analyses of tribal, developing, and modern state societies. The course explores a variety of concepts and approaches to the study of culture, and participants acquire experience in critical reading, critical thinking, and analytic writing. Students who have taken ANTH 103 may not receive credit for ANTH 106.   More Info

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  • ANTH 107  Intro To Archaeology

    Description:
    The study of the past through scientific analysis of the traces left behind by humans. This course introduces the history, theory, and methods of archaeological research through lectures and hands-on projects. Archaeological data are then used to examine such major transformations of human cultural evolution as the domestication of plants and animals and the origins of complex civilizations. Students prepare a paper suitable for the Writing Proficiency Requirement Portfolio. Students who have taken ANTH 102 may not receive credit for ANTH 107.   More Info

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  • ANTH 112G  Understanding Human Behavior

    Description:
    The course addresses issues of diversity through the use of cross-cultural/US-based readings and lectures. This material provides students with a backdrop against which they can begin to understand how culture (including their own) creates and sustains belief systems, including but not limited to constructions of race, class, and gendered systems of knowledge. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for ANTH C100 (Culture and Human Behavior), but not for both.   More Info

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  • ANTH 113G  Food and Society

    Description:
    This course explores how food is related to culture. Discussion topics include the origins of agriculture, food taboos, the social organization of eating, festivals, and feasting.   More Info

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  • ANTH 211  Human Origins

    Description:
    An introduction to the study of man''s biological origins with emphasis on the fossil record, primate analogues of human behavior, and the variety and diversity of modern man including the adaptive significance of this variability.   More Info

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  • ANTH 220G  Indigenous Peoples and Cultural Change in Amazonia

    Description:
    This course focuses on indigenous peoples of South America's Amazon region, and persistence and change in their cultures and histories, from 1500 to the present- especially in response to European colonizers, missionaries, modern states, and contemporary rain forest development. Participants consider the human rights issues involved, and critique conventional European representations of Amazonians, in ethnography, literature and film. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, academic self assessment, collaborative learning, information technology.   More Info

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  • ANTH 222G  Aztecs and Spaniards in the Conquest of Mexico

    Description:
    The defeat of the Aztec Empire by a small band of Spanish soldiers led by Hernan Cortes permanently changed the way Europeans understood the world, at the same time that it subjugated Mexico's indigenous population to the institutions of colonial rule. Both sides of this important cultural encounter are studied through a close examination of narratives about the conquest written a few days or a few decades from the events themselves. The course may be counted toward the anthropology major and completion of the Latin American studies program. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, academic self assessment, collaborative learning, information technology, oral presentation.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 223G  Afro-Caribbean Religions

    Description:
    The purpose of this course is to examine several of the better known Afro-Caribbean religious movements that have played a major role in the modern history of the Caribbean region. Historical influences from Europe, Africa and the Americas will be addressed. The course provides an introduction to the anthropological study of religion and to the field of Caribbean studies. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, information technology.   More Info

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  • ANTH 224G  The Rise and Fall of the Maya

    Description:
    This course focuses on the rise and fall of the Maya civilization in Central America. It considers their origins; political, economic, and social organization; religion and ideology; their eventual collapse; and the contemporary Maya. Discussions include the latest theories and controversies in Maya studies. This course may be counted toward the anthropology major. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, collaborative learning, information technology, oral presentation, academic self assessment.   More Info

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  • ANTH 227GL  Multicultural Expression and Celebration: U.S. Ethnic Festivals and Transnational Belonging

    Description:
    The course uses the lens of celebrating different communities ethnicities to explore ideas of transnational belonging as they relate to diaspora, ethnicity, and race in the contemporary United States. Class discussions focus on art and display, critical race theory, and anthropological studies of culture history and cultural migration to examine the politics of ethnicity, racialized identity, and national belonging. In so doing, students assess current goals for U.S. multiculturalism and its practical connections to multi-vocality. ANTH 227GL and ASAMST 227GL are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 230  Archaeological Myth & Mystery

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the myths, mysteries, frauds, and fantasies of archaeology and the human past, such as Atlantis, alien visitations, Stonehenge, pyramids, astronomical alignments, pre-Columbian visits to the North American continent, anachronistic artifacts, and outright hoaxes. These claims - some real, some false, some misunderstood, some intriguing - will be examined closely to see how well the explanations use evidence and how valid the assumptions are that uphold them. Students will learn how to critically evaluate these claims in their empirical, political, historical, and cultural contexts as well as try to understand the agendas, personalities, motives, and politics behind some o f the more unsupportable claims. Students my not receive credit for both ANTH 230 and ANTH 230G.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 232  The Viking World

    Description:
    The Viking Age (c. 793-1050 AD) is best known as Scandinavian raids throughout coastal Europe. This course examines the archaeology of the societies behind the Viking raids from their origins in Late Iron Age Scandinavia, to their expansion into Europe and the British Isles, and on to the discovery of North America and the colonization of Greenland. In addition to covering the archaeology and history of Viking Age societies, the course presents and critically evaluates several anthropological themes which have been exemplified by Norse society: the Germanic mode of production, gift exchange and reciprocity, proto-world systems, gender and class identity, pagan religious systems and mythology, the archaeology of religious conversion, and cultural contact in the preindustrial world.   More Info

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  • ANTH 247  Ancient Cities & States

    Description:
    This course compares the processes of state formation in major civilizations, including Mesopotamia, Early Dynastic Egypt, Shang China, Aztecs of Mesoamerica, Inca of Peru. Recent archaeological and historical data are used to explore cross-cultural themes such as the provisioning of cities, role of religious ideology, social organization of land and labor, and gendered dimensions of power and social identity.   More Info

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  • ANTH 260  Anthropology On Film

    Description:
    Film has become an important medium for recording and conveying information about human behavior. To what extent do ethnographic films present a complete and accurate record of cultural reality and to what extent do they project a filmmaker's romantic vision of 'message'? Examples of ethnographic film are viewed and discussed in light of these questions.   More Info

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  • ANTH 262  Dreams & Dreaming

    Description:
    A cross-cultural exploration of dreams and dreaming across cultures, with general attention to the western Pacific, and the Mekeo people of Papua New Guinea in particular: review of the anthropology of dreams in the context of theoretical works by Freud and Jung, and recent neurobiological studies; and , the relationship of dreams to notions of the self, person, and individual.   More Info

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  • ANTH 263  Anthropology of the Environment

    Description:
    This course focuses on people's complex relationships to their environment. It examines different anthropological approaches to analyze human adaptive strategies to diverse ecosystems around the world from a historical and cross-cultural perspective. It will also examine the different strategies and knowledge systems that humans develop for managing their resources. Finally, the course looks at the rise of political ecology as a perspective to analyze the role of power relations, institutions and ideas of nature in environmental change and conservation.   More Info

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  • ANTH 264  Shamanisms: Anthropological Perspectives

    Description:
    This course examines the varieties of religious experience, ritual, and practice that fall under the rubric of shamanism and shaman. Originally a Tungus (Siberian tribal people) word, shaman has been extended to include diverse group of specialists: from midwives to Shamans, Priests, Sorcerers, Prophets, and New Shamans. All these religious practitioners use their skills to achieve direct communication with the spiritual realm. The course focuses on the shamanism that is integral to many indigenous religions, and how it aims to fortify relations between humans and the spiritual world in order to validate cultural knowledge, regulate human relations with the natural environment, diagnose and heal human suffering, and build community solidarity.   More Info

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  • ANTH 269L  Anthropology of the Objects and the Objectified: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Things

    Description:
    We have all heard of, or used the term object to refer to things outside ourselves: the object of one's desires, the objectification of other cultures and peoples, works of art vs. ethnographic objects. In this course we deconstruct familiar discourses about things through an examination of the world of material possessions, places, people, ideas, and space in cross-cultural perspective. Our aim is to gain more nuanced understanding about the apparent human tendency to create our identities through assigning personal and cultural significance to objects around us. Course readings will be drawn primarily from anthropology, art history, art criticism, cultural studies, and curatorial/museum studies. We will also share our observations, experiences, and reflections of particular object worlds through museum site visits, class discussions, and individual projects. Our own milieu of the Western museums will offer valuable case studies about the historical and political implications of particular histories of collecting, classifying, displaying, and interpreting the wider world as a collection of objects. ANTH 269L and ART 269L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 270L  Native Peoples of North America

    Description:
    An introductory survey of Native American societies and cultures. Emphasis is given to the descriptive comparison of selected Native American societies, on their histories, and on problems in cross-cultural understanding. The course focuses on pre-twentieth century cultures and history. AMST 270L and ANTH 270L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 271  Peoples and Cultures of the Middle East

    Description:
    An examination of historical and socio-political forces in the formation of the contemporary Middle East; the cultural, ethnic, and economic diversity of modern nation-states in this region; neo-colonialism and imperialism as persisting obstacles to development and progress in this part of the world; and the role of Islam in reformist and revolutionary movements.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 272  Peoples and Cultures of Africa

    Description:
    An in-depth study of selected African societies, examining traditional institutions, the colonial situation, and modernization.   More Info

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  • ANTH 273  Peoples and Cultures of Mesoamerica (Mexico and Guatemala)

    Description:
    A survey of Mesoamerican ethnology including an introduction to cultural and linguistic regions through comparisons of ethnographic materials. Emphasis is given to acculturation, during the colonial period, among indigenous and Spanish-speaking populations, and, in the contemporary period, on social change among rural and urban sectors.   More Info

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  • ANTH 274  Peoples and Cultures of the Caribbean

    Description:
    An ethnographic and historical overview of the Caribbean, examining the impact of external forces on local economic organization, domestic life, religion, and migration, with attention to the importance of transnational communities and migrations that link the islands with the North American mainland.   More Info

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  • ANTH 275L  Peoples and Cultures of China

    Description:
    This course describes and analyzes China and Chinese society through the perspective of culture. By looking at the ways in which Chinese people lead their lives, the beliefs and ideas they place importance upon and the ways in which these ideas are manifested in people's actions, we hope to gain a more thorough understanding of China as a social, political and economic entity, and a more nuanced and analytical understanding of Chinas diverse peoples. Some of the themes we will address include the following: unity and diversity in Chinese society, the role of the family, the place of the state, food and eating, gender relations, ritual and religion, popular culture (particularly movies and opera), economic and social change, nationalism and international relations. ANTH 275L and ASIAN 275L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 278L  Introduction to Native American and Indigenous Studies

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to key issues and themes in Indigenous Studies and to issues of concern to native peoples today. The majority of the case studies used will refer to Native American/Indigenous Nations from North America, as these nations have the closest relationships with the modern U.S. and are those to whom we have the greatest responsibilities. Other case studies will be drawn from South and Central America, the Pacific (particularly Hawaii, Aotearoa/New Zealand, and Australia) and Asia. ANTH 278L and NAIS 278L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 280  Special Topics

    Description:
    The study of special topics in anthropology. Consult department's description of current offerings to find out about the topics being explored this semester. May be repeated for credit.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 295L  Introduction to Human Rights

    Description:
    This is a collaboratively taught interdisciplinary course on a variety of issues related to Human Rights as discourse and practice. It covers the emergence and institutionalization of human rights discourse in the 20th century, and examines its transformations and extensions into various social, economic, political and cultural realms globally. Topics include critique of Western and normative human rights, policies of indigenous people and women's rights, and cognitive and practical implementations of human rights. ANTH 295L and WOST 295L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 301L  Childhood in America

    Description:
    An interdisciplinary treatment of conceptions and practices of child nature and nurture in the United States, viewed in the context of American culture and history. The course begins with an historical overview of child life in America, with special attention to Puritan New England, nineteenth century industrialization and urbanization, and twentieth century trends. In treating contemporary childhood, the course examines mainstream patterns of the middle and working classes, both rural and urban; African-American child and family life; Hispano-American child and family life; enculturation among selected American Indian groups; the importance of gender as a variable in childhood experience; and the growing importance of formal institutions-such as schools, youth organizations, and medical institutions-as environments for young people. Children's own cultural constructions, in the form of games and folklore, are also considered. The course concludes with an examination of selected policy issues affecting children, such as child abuse, medical intervention, day care, and the Children's Rights Movement. AMST 301L and ANTH 301L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 310  Primate Behavior

    Description:
    A broadly-based survey of non-human primates as found in their natural habitats. The course includes discussion and practice in the techniques of observation, description, and analysis of behavior, as well as informed consideration of the use of primates as human models in behavioral and biomedical research.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 312  Human Variation

    Description:
    A consideration of the factors involved in the production and maintenance of biological variability within and between human populations.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 313  Developmental Models in Human Evolution

    Description:
    An adaptive approach to human growth and development. Physical change in the regional anatomy of the human organism from conception to death is studied. This information is used to construct a developmental counterpart to the fossil, comparative, and experimental evidence used to understand the evolution of human beings.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 316  Nutrition, Growth and Behavior

    Description:
    An evaluation of the influence of nutrition on growth and development in human populations. Particular emphasis on malnutrition and its effects on physical growth, neurological development and behavioral capacity. A model is developed which outlines the relationship between nutritional stress, the behavioral variation produced as a consequence of the stress, and the sociocultural characteristics of human communities.   More Info

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  • ANTH 317  Human Epidemiology

    Description:
    This course deals with the distribution and frequency of disease in human populations and stresses the role of social scientists and sociocultural data in epidemiological studies. Topics include measures of disease frequency, changing patterns of disease throughout human history, population variation in disease experience, types of epidemiological studies, and environmental and occupational factors that present health risks.   More Info

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  • ANTH 324  A Biocultural Approach to War

    Description:
    This course takes a biocultural approach to the study of warfare by taking a broad view of humans as evolved biological organisms and as cultural beings with complex behavior. This course will critically examine a variety of proposed causes for human warfare (evolutionary, materialism, historical contingency), looking at the evidence for conflict and cooperation in humans (and other species) in the archeological and ethnographic records. Second, this course will explore the epidemiological evidence for the effects of war on human health across the globe, including case studies on its effects on psychological health, nutrition, child growth, infection and other sequelae.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 330  Archaeology of colonialism in Native North America

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the archaeological and anthropological study of colonialism and North Americas indigenous people who confronted its various forms during the last 500+ years. The course focuses on how archaeologists use material culture, architecture, food remains, landscapes, and oral histories- -as well as a variety of historical documents- -to understand Indigenous responses to, engagements with, struggles within, and survival through these complex periods. Examples will be drawn from across the diverse regions, Native peoples, and colonial fronts (e.g., English, Spanish, Russian, French) that characterize the past few centuries of North Americas history.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 334  Ancient North America

    Description:
    An archaeological survey of North American prehistory, from Paleo-indian times to contact with Europeans, and focusing on subsistence, mobility, migration, trade, settlement, material culture, ideology, inequality, and gender in Native North America. The course uses case studies from several regions in the US and Canada, including the Northeast, Southwest, Northwest Coast, and Arctic.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 336L  Ancient Mesoamerica

    Description:
    This course uses archaeological and ethnohistorical data to chart the prehistoric transformation of Mesoamerica into the setting for several of the ancient world's most intriguing urban civilizations, including those of the Maya and the Aztecs. Emphasis is given to the common social patterns and ideological premises underlying the region's long-term cultural and political diversity. ANTH 336L and LATAM 336L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 338L  Ancient Peru: The Incas and Their Ancestors

    Description:
    This course uses ethnohistorical and archaeological data to examine the foundations of complex society in Andean South America; and stresses, as an underlying theme, human adaptation to the constraints and possibilities of the diverse Andean environments. Special emphasis is given to the accomplishments, both real and idealized, of the last of Peru's prehistorical civilizations, the Inca Empire. ANTH 338L and LATAM 338L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 340  Historical Archaeology

    Description:
    An introduction to historical archaeology, from its initial development to future directions. Topics include the subfields which comprise historical archaeology and their interrelationships; the contributions, both substantive and methodological, of historical archaeology to the field of archaeology; and industrial and historic sites in North America.   More Info

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  • ANTH 341  Archaeological Method and Theory with Laboratory

    Description:
    An introduction to the theory and application of scientific methods in archaeology. Emphasis is given to the ways that the material record of past human activity is formed, from the earliest cultures to those in historic times, and to the recovery and analysis of archaeological data through laboratory and field techniques drawn from geoscience, biology, chemistry, and archaeology.   More Info

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  • ANTH 343L  African Diaspora Archaeology: Uncovering Roots, Routes, and Resistance

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to African Diaspora archaeology, a burgeoning area of study within the sub-discipline of historical archaeology. Students will explore the concept of diaspora as a means to critically understand the factors underlying the forced dispersal of African people. Participants will consider how archaeological studies of the African diaspora have yielded alternative interpretations of the black past. Throughout the semester, students will examine how archaeologists have investigated the physical and culture landscape, foodways, ritual and religion and objects from everyday life to reveal the ways the black people have resisted and responded to enslavement and other forms of racial oppression. ANTH 343L and AFRSTY 343L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ANTH 345  Theory in Sociocultural Anthropology

    Description:
    A selective comparative, historical review of major schools of thought in anthropological theory, with special attention to alternative theories of culture, in relation to society, history, ecology, and political economy; and the application of such theories to the analysis of particular ethnographic cases.   More Info

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  • ANTH 346  Culture, Globalization, and the Environment

    Description:
    This course will focus on the interrelation between globalization and the environment in a cross cultural perspective. It will examine the rise of globalization from its colonial antecedents to the modern global era and its multiple effects on local populations and their environment. Topics include environmental institutions, global discourses of environmentalism, environmental movements., media, climate change, and finally, understanding the complex and dynamic nature of engagements between the local and the global.   More Info

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  • ANTH 348  Ethnographic Inquiry: Introduction to Qualitative Field Research

    Description:
    An introduction to the methods and tools used in qualitative research, including important anthropological techniques such as participant-observation, life histories, and interviewing within an historical, social, and political context. Ethical issues surrounding qualitative research will be addressed. Students will also conduct their own ethnographic fieldwork projects during the semester, learning through practice how to utilize particular methods of qualitative research.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 349  Anthropology of Development

    Description:
    This course examines the contributions made by anthropology to the analysis of development in the Third World. It assesses two contrasting perspectives: development anthropology, which focuses on the dynamics of working on practical projects, and the anthropology of development which makes a series of critiques of development theory and practice. Topics include planning and policy; indigenous traditional knowledge, aid, health, and sustainable development.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 352  Applied Social Anthropology

    Description:
    How is social anthropology used to solve human problems? This course considers anthropological research and intervention in such fields as business management, communications, health care, parks and recreation, urban development, education, and mental health. Special attention is given to the ethical dilemmas encountered by practicing anthropologists. This course helps students assess the relevance of social science training to later career choices.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 353  Urban Anthropology

    Description:
    A comparative study of the form and quality of urban life in the contemporary United States and in selected non-Western cultures. Through an examination of selected case studies, the course assesses the varying theories, methodological strategies, and research techniques that have been employed in anthropological analyses of cities; and considers their significance in the broader field of urban studies. Attention is also given to the cultural evolutionary processes leading to the origin and spread of cities and urbanized society, in both the ancient and modern worlds.   More Info

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  • ANTH 357  Culture, Disease, and Healing

    Description:
    Human adaptations to disease and illness in prehistory and history, and across cultures. Medical systems considered as social and cultural systems related to social structure, religion, economics, and power. Topics include medical anthropology as a field of study, paleopathology, ecology and epidemiology of disease, theories of disease and healing, sorcery and witchcraft, public health and preventive medicine, anatomy and surgery, obstetrics and population control, pain and stress, emotional states, status and role of healers and patients.   More Info

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  • ANTH 359  Economies and cultures in comparative perspective

    Description:
    This course approaches economic behavior, ideas and institutions using two of the hallmarks of anthropology: field-based methods of data collection and cross-cultural comparison. Through ethnographic case studies, anthropological theory and first-hand observation, we will consider the embeddedness of the economy in complex socio-cultural systems, ideological and institutional. A range of systems of production, distribution and consumption in contemporary and past economies will allow students to systematically critique familiar economic ideas and institutions. Topics will include reciprocity and redistribution, traditional markets, notions of scarcity, affluence and fairness, the regulation of economic behavior by formal and informal institutions, the economic division of labor and the interface between modern and traditional economies.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 364  Anthropology of Adolescence: Biocultural Interactions

    Description:
    This course takes an anthropological, biological, and phylogenetic approach to questions about adolescence, including: What elements of growth and maturation define adolescence, and is this life stage unique to humans? How do the bodys priorities change, and what can we learn about the selective pressures that shaped human evolution when we examine those changes in the context of ecological and cultural variation? How, at the threshold of adulthood, is gender newly constructed, and what commonalities and cultural variations in the gender inculcation process exist across the glove? Texts will include literature on human growth and development; comparative data from non-human primates; anthropological literature on rites of passage viewed cross-culturally; and literary dramatizations of coming of age.   More Info

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  • ANTH 366  The Anthropology of Religion

    Description:
    A comparative study of religion, including belief systems, social functions, ritual processes. Religions of a variety of cultures are considered, and some emphasis is given to the development of modern anthropological theories of religion and on current methods of analysis and interpretation.   More Info

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  • ANTH 367  Social and Cultural Perspectives on Witchcraft and Sorcery

    Description:
    Beliefs about people with extraordinary powers to cause harm or good are found in societies of different types and in different periods in history. This course examines such beliefs in a number of different cultural, geographical, and historical contexts in order to demonstrate ways in which anthropologists and other social scientists approach the more general problem of understanding the function of belief systems in human society. The course does not teach techniques of witchcraft or sorcery.   More Info

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  • ANTH 368  Myth in Cultural Context

    Description:
    An anthropological analysis and interpretation of myth, using texts from a variety of world cultures, including African, ancient Middle Eastern, Native American, Amazonian, Mediterranean and other traditions as primary materials. The course offers an overview of central problems and issues in the anthropological study of myth, and emphasizes the importance of examining myths within their socio-cultural settings. The course also considers some of the important theoretical perspectives that have been developed within anthropology for the study of myths and folklore.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 372  Anthropology of Death

    Description:
    Although human mortality occurs in all societies, it is understood and defined differently within various settings. This course examines how culture influences the way people respond to the fact of death. Key themes include: the analysis of funeral rituals; religion and art in relation to death; cultural dimensions of mourning; and the relationship between social organization and death.   More Info

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  • ANTH 374  Cultural Politics and Indigenous Peoples in Latin America

    Description:
    This course introduces intellectual debates about the historical and ethnographical world of indigenous populations in Latin America, focusing on how politically powerful outsiders have impacted these groups from pre-Columbian times to the present. Students will also analyze how indigenous ontologies influence knowledge, identity, and the role that they play when confronted by Western modernity through its different projects such as development, land reform, neoliberalism, environmental struggles, gender, democratization, autonomy, and migration.   More Info

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  • ANTH 376  Native People of New England: Contemporary Issues

    Description:
    This course will engage students in an examination of the current political, cultural, and economic issues important to Native Americans in New England. Among the major topics to be explored are sovereignty, land rights, federal acknowledgement, and identity. The course provides an overview of major events and legal cases of the 20th century, and will include guest lectures by Native leaders, scholars, and activists.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 385  Language and Culture

    Description:
    The study of language and culture as systems of shared symbols and meanings in which verbal and nonverbal social interaction takes place. Special emphasis is given to the relationship of language to culture and on the social role of language in human life. Students are introduced to methods for analyzing social behavior and its underlying cultural principles.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 412  Issues in Biological Anthropology

    Description:
    An in-depth discussion of current research in biological anthropology based on the reading of primary material from the recent literature. The course is oriented toward the study of human populations and focuses on important controversies and major research trends in a variety of areas including skeletal biology, nutrition, genetics, epidemiology, and evolutionary theory.   More Info

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  • ANTH 413  Forensic Anthropology

    Description:
    A course about reconstructing a human life from what may remain after death. Methods of determining age, sex, ancestry, and stature will be explored, along with what pathologies, anomalies, trauma, and personal habits can be deduced from bony and soft tissue remains. How the evidence garnered from fossils, comparative anatomy and behavior, tissue reconstruction, and our understanding of human growth and development will be used to further understand the nature of the physical and social person. An applied science used in criminology, archaeology, and elsewhere.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ANTH 425  Contemporary Issues in Anthropology

    Description:
    A capstone seminar for anthropology majors, this course uses the lens of anthropological analysis to address a different topical theme each semester concerning the community and the world in which we live. The seminar encourages students to apply their previous classroom experience in the discipline to a multidimensional view of contemporary issues through individual and small group research projects.   More Info

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  • ANTH 432  Archeological Science

    Description:
    This course applies the methods and techniques of the sciences to the problems and issues of archaeology. The course is part of the teaching program of the Center for Materials Research in Archaeology and Ethnology, a Boston-area consortium of universities and museums. Courses may be taught at any of the participating institutions, and exact content will vary.   More Info

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  • ANTH 444  Cooperative Education for Anthropology Majors

    Description:
    Through the Cooperative Education Program anthropology majors may be placed in paid work situations either directly related to the field of anthropology or where anthropological concepts, theories, and/or methods can be explored. In conjunction with the work experience, students undertake a learning project under the direction of a faculty member. This project is based on a prospectus approved by the faculty advisor, which should include appropriate readings, field observation, and written work equivalent to a 3-credit, classroom-based course. Note: This course may not be counted toward the anthropology major distribution requirement.   More Info

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  • ANTH 476L  Current Issues in Native America

    Description:
    This seminar focuses on the lives of modern Native Americans, on reservations and off. Topics for reading, discussion, and original research include law, politics, economic development, public health, education, and the arts. Each student in the seminar compiles and presents a comprehensive case study on a subject relevant to one of the seminar themes. AMST 476L and ANTH 476L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ANTH 477  LLOP Research Seminar

    Description:
    Instruction in how to develop a comprehensive plan for research on a Latino Studies topic with significant public policy implications. Review of research design procedures, literature assessment, problem definition, use of range of qualitative and quantitative research methods drawn broadly from the social sciences.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 478  Directed Study I

    Description:
    Advanced students may conduct independent research under the supervision and guidance of members of the faculty. Please note: This course may not be counted toward the anthropology major distribution requirement.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 479  Directed Study II

    Description:
    Advanced students may conduct independent research under the supervision and guidance of members of the faculty. Please note: This course may not be counted toward the anthropology major distribution requirement.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 480  Special Topics Seminar I

    Description:
    Intensive study of special topics, varying each year according to instructor.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ANTH 483  Field Research in Cultural Anthropology

    Description:
    A supervised sequence of field research in cultural anthropology. This research involves continuous study in a field situation directed by a professional anthropologist. The course may include attendance at field schools directed by qualified faculty outside the University, with permission of the department. No more than six credits from field research courses (483, 484, 485, 486) can be applied toward the major.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 485  Field Research in Archaeology

    Description:
    A supervised sequence of field research in archaeology. This research involves continuous study in a field situation directed by a professional anthropologist. The course may include attendance at field schools directed by qualified faculty outside the University, with permission of the department. No more than six credits from field research courses (483, 484, 485, 486) can be applied toward the major.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 488  Internship in Anthropology

    Description:
    Part-time work experience (8 hours per week) in an appropriate business, governmental, laboratory, clinical, museum, or non-profit institution, supervised by an on-site supervisor and an Anthropology Department faculty sponsor. Conferences with the course instructor and appropriate written work are required. The department strongly recommends that students take ANTH 352 before enrolling in this course. Note: This course may not be counted toward the anthropology major distribution requirement.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 490  Independent Rsrch I

    Description:
    Independent research in anthropology conducted under the supervision of members of the faculty. Please note: This course may not be counted toward the anthropology major distribution requirement.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ANTH 491  Independent Research II

    Description:
    Independent research in anthropology conducted under the supervision of members of the faculty. Please note: This course may not be counted toward the anthropology major distribution requirement.   More Info

    Offered in: