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Course Catalog

UGRD > ART

Art

  • ART 100  The Language of Art

    Description:
    The course teaches students to begin to understand the processes of artistic creation. It enables the student to grasp the expressive content of works of art in a wide variety of media and to analyze how the artist creates his/her effect. It is not an historical survey. Through lectures, discussions, field trips, and museum visits, the student studies paintings, sculptures, and buildings; examples are chosen as often as possible from the Boston area. The course addresses such concepts as elements of composition, rhythm, symmetry, and space; and the possibilities of differing interpretations of subject matter. It offers a solid introduction to the arts by developing the student's ability to see and analyze forms as the result of aesthetic and interpretive decisions. (Course offered in CAPS.)   More Info

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  • ART 101  Ancient and Medieval Art

    Description:
    The course offers an historical survey of art and architecture of the ancient world, giving particular emphasis to Egyptian, Greek and Roman cultures. Students are also introduced to the arts in Medieval Europe, with a special focus on the Romanesque and Gothic styles. (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

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  • ART 102  Renaissance to Modern Art

    Description:
    An historical survey of Western art and architecture from the fifteenth century to the twentieth century. The course deals with different aspects of the art of the Renaissance in Italy and the North, the Baroque and Rococo, Neoclassicism and Romanticism, Realism and Impressionism, and Post-Impressionism. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

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  • ART 104L  Introduction to East Asian Art

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to East Asian art, focusing on Japan and China. It is divided into three historical segments: early forms of Buddhism, paintings of the scholar class, and the interaction of tradition with imported Western cultural forms. These topics provide a comparative context for exploring style, culture, class and gender. ART 104L and ASIAN 104L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ART 105G  Eyes on the Ball: The Art of Play

    Description:
    This course will focus on the broad definition of play in contemporary culture as experienced through the eye, body, and mind. It will seek to activate and heighten your senses and acumen in the artistic arena using the notion of play in various categories. Well look at how play and games figure prominently in daily life through language, art, film, sports, and athletic competition. In addition to critical reading and writing there will be exercises and projects designed to make you more aware of our kinesthetic response to the daily visual stimuli all around us. The goal of this course is to enliven your notion of curiosity in order to make manifest the layered richness of your surroundings, develop critical visual literacy, and to play. You will also learn basic video skills and explore the poetic, empirical, experiential, and mundane. The course will be broken into three sections: Open Your Eyes: The Notion of Play; Mind Play and Mental Gymnastics: Playing Philosophical Ping-Pong with Language, and Win/Lose: Sports and Play.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 199  Visual Thinking

    Description:
    This course serves as an introduction to the visual arts by emphasizing how one thinks visually. It provides training and exploration in the organization of sensory experiences - experiences which are already ordered in forms of art and design or which are encountered haphazardly in the world around us. Writing assignments complement studio exercises , lectures and selected reading dealing with issues such as space, light, color, and composition.   More Info

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  • ART 207L  Queer Visual Culture: Sexuality, Gender, and Visual Representation

    Description:
    This course explores visual representations of gender and sexuality and the socio-historical contexts of their production. Non-heteronormative viewpoints area a specific focus, as are the scholarly frameworks of feminism, LGBT, (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) Studies, and Queer Theory.   More Info

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  • ART 210  Studies in the History of Art

    Description:
    Topics vary from semester to semester according to the needs of the program and opportunities to engage visiting specialists. Please contact the department for descriptions of current and/or contemplated offerings. (Course not offered on a regular basis.)   More Info

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  • ART 220G  Images of the Body

    Description:
    This course explores images of the body in a variety of media, including painting, sculpture, photography, film, video, and dance. Students will gain a critical awareness of how these images are constructed, by whom and for whom they are created, and the various ways they produce meaning. Topics will include: gender androgyny, sexual orientation, and the depiction of children.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 222  Survey of American Art

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the history of painting, sculpture, and architecture in America from the 17th century to the present day. Art works will be presented within the context of American culture and includes such topics as the reliance of early American art on the norms of Europe, the quest for a distinct American cultural identity, and visual arts as expressions distinct ethnic, cultural, and gender groups.   More Info

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  • ART 229  American Prints, Politics, and Popular Culture

    Description:
    This lecture course introduces students to the history of American graphic arts, photography, print media, and visual uses of the Internet through topics in politics and culture. From the first publications of graphic arts in the 16th century, the mass-produced image and its presentation have played a vital role in shaping the way Americans view and represent themselves. Superior examples - those that rise to the level of aesthetic excellence - afford deep and rich opportunities for engaging these ideas. Topics include: American prints, politics, and war; American photography, gender, and identity; race and representation in American culture; and the rise of mass media, the World Wide Web, and advertising in the United States.   More Info

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  • ART 230  Architecture, Design, and Society

    Description:
    This course introduces students to Western and non-Western architecture and design. It explores the social, economic, and political roles of the design professions while tracing theory, technique, and form from ancient times to the present. Although the contributions of architecture are emphasized, the course also examines landscape architecture, urban design, and interior design. Sophomore standing is recommended.   More Info

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  • ART 250  Art of the Twentieth Century

    Description:
    An analysis of the art of the twentieth century involves fundamental issues of form and content shared by all the arts. Taking a threefold approach-formal, critical, and historical-this course examines the development of modern painting, sculpture, and architecture as well as the ascendant art forms of photography, video, and performance. It analyzes general theories and specific works in detail. Through class discussions, reading assignments, papers, and field trips, the student learns that the formal problems posed by twentieth century art are closely related to those in literature, music, and theater, for they are problems of structure and definition, harmony and rhythm, diction and coherence. The student thus develops critical capabilities that he or she can apply to works by Picasso or Eliot, Matisse or Ravel.   More Info

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  • ART 252  American Art in Boston

    Description:
    Survey of painting, sculpture, architecture, graphic arts,photography and urban planning in Boston from 17th century to 20th century.   More Info

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  • ART 254  American Architecture

    Description:
    A survey of American architecture and town planning from the seventeenth century to the present. Topics include early colonial architecture, the search for a new style for the new republic, nineteenth century expansion and eclecticism, the revival of domestic architecture, the skyscraper style, and the development of modern architecture in the twentieth century.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ART 256  The Arts of Japan

    Description:
    This course is a chronological survey of Japan's major artistic traditions. Painting, sculpture, ceramics and architecture are set in historical, religious, and cultural contexts, with particular emphasis on identity issues deriving from Japan's periodic participation in continental Chinese culture. The course is organized to foreground issues of social class in terms of patronage, power, and representation.   More Info

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  • ART 258  The Arts of China

    Description:
    This course surveys major artistic traditions of China, beginning with its earliest history. Topics include ritual bronzes, sculpture, ceramics, and the major genres of painting. The course material focuses on the central problem of culture and class identity: how culture, and more specifically art objects and style, are used to shape class identity and power.   More Info

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  • ART 259  Art Now: History and Theory of Contemporary Art

    Description:
    Art Now covers the recent history of art from 1945 to the present, examining new forms and practices that begin to emerge in the second half of the 20th century and continue to develop into the 21st century. This course serves as a basic introduction to the primary issues under consideration in contemporary art theory and practice , addressing important challenges launched by contemporary artists to notions such as medium, objecthood, and aesthetics.   More Info

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  • ART 262L  Greek Art and Architecture

    Description:
    An introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Greece, from the Late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, with special attention to social and cultural contexts. Through careful study and analysis of key works we will explore the visual codes and cultural expectations that informed their original creation and reception, as well as the qualities that have contributed to their enduring influence and prestige. ART 262L and CLSICS 262L are the same person.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 265  Film Analysis

    Description:
    Any thorough and systematic study of film, because of its essentially interdisciplinary nature, must address concerns and problems common to other forms of artistic expression such as literature, theater, painting, and photography. This course goes beyond the conventional experience of theater and TV viewing and employs detailed analysis by means of slow motion and still frame techniques. The films studied include examples of classic Hollywood, contemporary American, and foreign feature films, and the documentary. The course is not primarily historical in emphasis; rather, its concerns are the visual language of film, its use as the vehicle for narrative and theme, and major film types and styles.   More Info

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  • ART 267  Great Film Directors

    Description:
    A critical and analytical examination of selected works by four major film directors. Directors to be included vary each time the course is offered.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ART 269L  Anthropology of the Objects and the Objectified: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Things

    Description:
    We have all heard of, or used the term object to refer to things outside ourselves: the object of one's desires, the objectification of other cultures and peoples, works of art vs. ethnographic objects. In this course we deconstruct familiar discourses about things through an examination of the world of material possessions, places, people, ideas, and space in cross-cultural perspective. Our aim is to gain more nuanced understanding about the apparent human tendency to create our identities through assigning personal and cultural significance to objects around us. Course readings will be drawn primarily from anthropology, art history, art criticism, cultural studies, and curatorial/museum studies. We will also share our observations, experiences, and reflections of particular object worlds through museum site visits, class discussions, and individual projects. Our own milieu of the Western museums will offer valuable case studies about the historical and political implications of particular histories of collecting, classifying, displaying, and interpreting the wider world as a collection of objects. ANTH 269L and ART 269L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ART 270  History of Film

    Description:
    This course provides students with a broad overview of the historical developments of film as a medium. We explore fundamental technological, industrial, and economic developments impacting cinematic production while also examining some of the most significant aesthetics and political movements of the last hundred years. Students also learn analytical and interpretative skills as we examine specific films.   More Info

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  • ART 277  Art History in Action: Materials & Methods

    Description:
    Through the close analysis of texts and works of art this course examines the kinds of questions art historians have asked and are now asking and the variety of methods they use to study issues of style, subject matter, artistic intentionality, reception, and personal and ethnic identity. It also addresses the institutionssuch as universities, museums, auction houses, and publishing housesthat provide forums of art historical discourse. Critical analysis of the field of art history is supported by multiple classes taught on site in local museums. Students will be given a detailed introduction to research materials and the mechanics of academic writing, including how to write a visual analysis; how to compile and annotate a bibliography; how to distinguish what belongs in the text from what belongs in the endnotes; how to construct and argument; and, ultimately, how to write a research paper. Some material will be presented in a lecture format, but most classes will focus on group discussions, student presentations, and in-class collaborative projects.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 278L  U.S. Documentary Photography

    Description:
    This course examines U.S. documentary photographs as constructions of the past that articulate the social and political assumptions of their times. We will assess the impact of these photographs on their contemporary audiences and how they have shaped Americans' collective memories of such events as the conquest of the West, mass immigration, the Great Depression, and 9/11. AMST 278L and ART 278L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ART 281  Drawing I

    Description:
    A comprehensive introduction to basic materials and techniques, with emphasis on drawing as a primary means for the description and interpretation of people and their environment. Problems in still life, landscape, and life drawing. Fundamentals of visual language are also addressed.   More Info

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  • ART 286  Materials, Processes, and Ideas: Introduction to Contemporary Sculptural Practices

    Description:
    This course presents the concepts, processes, and materials that form the foundation of sculpture and its evolving definition. It will explore the possibilities for autobiographical, aesthetic, conceptual, and formal expression through the practice of sculpture. Methods and approaches to the sculptural practice will include object making, conceptual art, video, installation, public art, and performance. This course will introduce new ways of visual thinking, development, and awareness through individual meetings, critiques, readings, discussions, and current exhibitions.   More Info

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  • ART 287  Introduction to Printmaking

    Description:
    Intro to Printmaking examines process, creativity and exploration involved in the creation of a number of different printing methods, including relief and intaglio. It involves the practice of learning to see through the activity of making prints. Students apply drawing, visual design, digital image making and painting fundamentals to this medium and work in black and white and in color. It is a hands on studio course that promotes the conceptualization and expression of a visual idea and the refinement of visual aesthetic unique to each student.   More Info

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  • ART 293  Photography I

    Description:
    An introduction to basic issues in photography. The mechanics of the camera, the techniques of the darkroom, and matters of creative and personal import are addressed through illustrated lectures, class critiques, and assigned lab hours. Some attention is given to the history of photography.   More Info

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  • ART 295  Introduction to Video

    Description:
    This studio course is an introduction to working creatively with moving images within a personal, historical, and critical framework. Through technical workshops using iMovie and Final Cut Pro on the Macintosh, students explore the potential of digital non-linear editing and examine the characteristics and strategies of various genres and forms to inform and enrich their own production.   More Info

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  • ART 297  Introduction to Digital Media Art

    Description:
    Introduces students to an informed and critically engaged art practice using digital imaging software tools in a Macintosh environment. This course serves as a basic introduction to digital imaging, web media and influential themes in digital arts culture. Lab hours are required for the successful completion of the course.   More Info

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  • ART 305  Early Medieval Art

    Description:
    This course is a chronological survey of the are and architecture of western Europe and Byzantium from the Early Christian period to the rise of the Holy Roman Empire (c. 200-c. 1100 C.E.). Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on the religious, political, and socioeconomic contexts in which are objects were produced. Important themes of the course include the origins of Christian images, the debate over the place of images in religious worship, the role of patrons and politics, the impact of pilgrimage, the cult of relics and saints, and the changing depiction of Christ.   More Info

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  • ART 306  Romanesque and Gothic Art

    Description:
    This course is a chronological survey of the art and architecture of western Europe from the Romanesque to the late Middle Ages (c.1100-c.1500). Lectures, readings, and discussions will focus on the religious, political, and socioeconomic contexts in which are objects were produced. Especially important are key themes such as the impact of monasticism, the experience of pilgrimage, the cult of relics and saints, the role of patrons and politics, the relationship between text and image, issues of gender and viewership, the liturgical function of the art object, and the rise of private devotional practices.   More Info

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  • ART 309  Northern Renaissance Art

    Description:
    This course surveys the art produced in northern Europe (primarily the Netherlands, France, and Germany) from the fourteenth through the sixteenth century. Lectures, readings, and discussions will stress key themes such as the role of patronage, the rise of the self-conscious artist, the dynamics of material and original setting, the development of new kinds of subject matter, the beginnings of printmaking, the rise of the art market, the impact of devotional practices and pilgrimage, and the use of images by religious reformers.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ART 310  Special Topics

    Description:
    A course designed to provide in-depth study in different aspects of the history of painting, dealing with ideas, issues, movements, and major figures. Topics vary by semester and instructor. Consult current course announcement for specifics.   More Info

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  • ART 311  Early Italian Renaissance Art

    Description:
    This course focuses on early Renaissance art and architecture in Italy, 1300-1500. Focusing on Tuscany, it assesses how the visual arts were informed by humanism, politics, monastic reform, and the emergence of a wealthy mercantile class. The course also considers artists' growing self-awareness as professionals contributing to intellectual developments. Artists to be studied include Giotto, Brunelleschi, Donatello, Masaccio, Alberti, and Botticelli.   More Info

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  • ART 313  Baroque Art In Italy

    Description:
    This course concerns Baroque art and architecture in Italy circa 1580-1680. It examines art in the context of religious reform, scientific discoveries, and political absolutism to determine how these developments informed the style, subject matter(both religious and secular) and functions of art in society. Artists to be studied include Caravaggio, Bernini, Borromini, Claude, Poussin, and Guarini.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ART 317  Painting, 1850-1900

    Description:
    Painting in the second half of the nineteenth century: realism, impressionism, symbolism, art nouveau and post-impressionism. The course traces the development of these movements and of the leading figures responsible for their development (e.g., Courbet, Degas, Manet, Matisse, Monet, Seurat, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Cezanne).   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 319  Painting, 1945 to the Present

    Description:
    Trends and tendencies in contemporary art: abstract expressionism, pop, op, minimal, post-painterly abstraction, color field, new realism, happening, performance art, video and conceptual art, the new expressionism, and Neo Geo art. In addition to investigating these movements and the major figures involved in their development, the course also considers the role of contemporary criticism and its influence on the arts.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 321  Space and Place in Contemporary Art

    Description:
    This course will take the notions of "space" and "place" as points of entry into the disparate array of practices that constitute the variegated and ever-expanding field of contemporary art. The source material for this class will be drawn from a range of artists, theorists, and movements, each of which reflects on the social construction of space and on the technologies, norms, and conventions with which humans represent space back to themselves.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 327L  Hellenistic Art and Culture

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the Hellenistic period--the three centuries between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the defeat of Cleopatra at Actium in 31 BC--particularly primarily through a close examination of the visual arts. Hellenistic art and architecture are examined in their political, social, religious, and multi-cultural contexts, in order to arrive at a fuller portrait of the age. ART 327L and CLSICS 327L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 338  Nineteenth-Century Architecture

    Description:
    This course discusses stylistic and theoretical developments in architecture during the nineteenth century, with an emphasis on European architects. It looks at the changing character of classicism and the rise of a Gothic revival; as well as at the impact of new technologies, new types of building (the railroad station, the department store), and the architectural response to social problems through housing and town planning.   More Info

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  • ART 339  Modern Architecture

    Description:
    Theory and form in twentieth century architecture. The course presents a detailed examination of architecture in both Europe and America since 1900. Subjects include art nouveau; de Stijl; the Bauhaus; the new internationalism as against art deco styles; fascist and capitalist architecture of the thirties and forties; minimalist styles as against revivalism; the sculptural and monumental as against nihilist attitudes in contemporary architecture. Some thought is given to the contrast between "popular" and "elitist" styles. Considerable attention is given to contemporary theories on the function and forms of architecture.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 348  Caravaggio

    Description:
    This course focuses on Caravaggio, the revolutionary Italian Baroque painter. Emphasis is given to the widely different interpretations of both the artist himself and his work. Caravaggio's paintings are studied in their original intellectual, religious, and social contexts. In addition, the reception of Caravaggio and his art in the 17th century and in our own day is analyzed in detail.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 356  Japanese Architecture

    Description:
    This course surveys the major architectural traditions of Japan from their origins to the twentieth century. Topics include the development of indigenous styles of architecture-Shinto shrines, tea houses and gardens, among others-and the joint impact of Buddhism and Chinese/Korean culture.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 362L  Japanese Art from 16th to 20th Centuries: Japan and the West

    Description:
    This course looks at Japanese art across mediums during the sixteenth through twentieth centuries; in Japanese historical terms, from the Momoyama through Meiji periods. The course will pay particular attention to how Japanese are engaged with the West and Western art, beginning with Portuguese traders in the sixteenth century, moving the so-called "period of isolation" from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries, and concluding with the opening of Japan following Commodore Perry's arrival in 1853.   More Info

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  • ART 369  American Women Photographers

    Description:
    This course explores American women photographers and their contributions to the discourse and evolution of photography in America from the nineteenth to early twenty-first centuries.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 377  Introduction to Multimedia

    Description:
    This studio art course is an introduction to interactive multimedia that focuses on the computer as a tool for making creative work. Students are exposed to current software, focusing on audio, video, and interactive elements, and also are asked to explore the relationship of the digital environment to traditional and historical art concepts.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 380  Studio Workshop

    Description:
    A course dealing with one or more techniques, media, and problems not covered or explored in other specific workshops. Content varies; consult current course announcement. (Course not offered on a regular basis.)   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 381W  Drawing Workshop

    Description:
    A continuation of Drawing I, this course introduces wet media and color and involves assigned visual problems which emphasize individual pictorial statements. The focus of the course varies each semester. May be repeated for credit.   More Info

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  • ART 383  Painting Workshop

    Description:
    This course addresses problems in painting, emphasizing the articulation of personal pictorial statements. Different media and techniques are tested against traditional and non-traditional approaches, both formal and conceptual. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated for credit.   More Info

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  • ART 386  Sculpture Workshop

    Description:
    This course will act as an advanced forum for visual artists with an emphasis on sculpture and its evolving definition. It will push students to question conventional ideas about contemporary art and define it for themselves. The class will challenge every student to develop a critical self-awareness about his or her own work and better understand the issues and contexts that inform art-making today. The approach will be multidisciplinary, from varied perspective, and students will further develop a personal artistic vocabulary with the source material that informs it. Individual meetings, critiques, readings, discussions, current exhibitions, and exposure to past and present modes and methodologies of art making will be used to introduce new ways of visual thinking, development, and awareness.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ART 387  Printmaking Workshop

    Description:
    This course explores diverse printmaking techniques, combining and incorporating them into other visual disciplines such as painting, photography, and digital media. Students are challenged to develop their imagery and concepts and to articulate their ideas. This course is topic-oriented; the particular focus varies each semester. May be repeated for credit.   More Info

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  • ART 393W  Photography Workshop

    Description:
    This workshop is designed to expand knowledge of black and white photography learned in Photography I through individually initiated projects. While technical improvement is essential, emphasis is always given to the ideas and intentions behind the projects. Topics vary each semester. May be repeated for credit.   More Info

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  • ART 395W  Video Workshop

    Description:
    Designed to strengthen and expand students' technical facility through hand-on exploration of non-linear digital editing using Final Cut Pro software on the Macintosh. This course also helps foster the development of a personal vision within a historical and critical framework of emerging digital technology. Workshops may be devoted to specific genres and/or specific technical or conceptual concerns. May be repeated for credit.   More Info

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  • ART 397  Digital Media Workshop

    Description:
    An exploration of digital media in the process of making art. Students utilize imaging software at an advanced level, building on skills learned in ART 297 and ART 377. The course expands the understanding of digital art as it relates to contemporary art practice and to traditional art processes such as drawing and painting. Topics vary and the course may be repeated for credit.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 402L  American Visual Cultures

    Description:
    This course explores the historical, cultural, and aesthetic importance of visual images in shaping ideas about empire, race, gender, class, work, and nation in American culture. We will think about our reasons for looking and how different historical contexts change how and why we look as consumers. We will learn how to interpret and analyze visual evidence from a variety of forms, including film cartoons live performance, photographs, and print advertising, from the mid-nineteenth century through the twenty-first. AMST 402L and ART 402L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 436L  The American Suburb

    Description:
    This course traces the history of the American suburb during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, emphasizing the changing social and physical character of suburban development. It investigates the relationship between design and society through the study of such topics as the nature of domesticity, the technologies of housekeeping, the impact of the automobile, and the suburb in the American imagination. AMST 436L and ART 436L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 478  Independent Study

    Description:
    This course is an independent investigation in Art History under the supervision of qualified faculty that is open to a limited number of students in any semester. A written prospectus of the project is required of applicants. Please note: ART 478 cannot be counted toward the minimum major requirement of twelve departmental courses.   More Info

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  • ART 479  Independent Study

    Description:
    This course is an independent investigation in Studio Art under the supervision of qualified faculty that is open to a limited number of students in any semester. A written prospectus of the project is required of applicants. Please note: ART 479 cannot be counted toward the minimum major requirement of twelve departmental courses.   More Info

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  • ART 481  Seminar in Visual Studies

    Description:
    Designed primarily for the art major, to provide advanced work in areas and topics not normally offered in existing courses. Course content varies with instructor.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ART 488  Special Problems: Field Work

    Description:
    An independent project with an off-campus project focus under the supervision of a qualified professional. Open to a limited number of students in any semester. A written prospectus of the project, and a written final report, are required of all applicants. Please note: ART 488 and 489 cannot be counted toward the minimum major requirement of twelve departmental courses. (Course offered in the fall only.) (Course offered on a pass/fail basis only.)   More Info

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  • ART 489  Special Problems: Field Work

    Description:
    An independent project with an off-campus project focus under the supervision of a qualified professional. Open to a limited number of students in any semester. A written prospectus of the project, and a written final report, are required of all applicants. Please note: ART 488 and 489 cannot be counted toward the minimum major requirement of twelve departmental courses.   More Info

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  • ART 491  Honors Project

    Description:
    This is the first semester's work of two leading to consideration for the award of Honors in Art. Course work includes an approved creative and/or research project under faculty supervision. Grades are to be awarded by supervising faculty as in regular independent study courses. Students may elect to withdraw from consideration for Honors and continue other course work without jeopardy to grades or credit. See departmental regulations for a description of this program.   More Info

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  • ART 492  Honors Project

    Description:
    Continuation of work begun in ART 491. Candidacy for continuation in the Honors Program will be determined by the Honors Committee prior to enrollment in this course. Students may elect to withdraw from consideration for Honors and continue other work without jeopardy to grades or credit. Grades are to be awarded by supervising faculty as in regular independent study courses.   More Info

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