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Course Catalog

UGRD > CLSICS

Classics

  • CLSICS 125G  The Myth of the Hero

    Description:
    This course examines the image of the hero in ancient Greek literature, focusing particularly on epics and tragedies that present single heroes or heroines who must undertake a journey or confront enemies. In addition to assessing various constructions of the hero, the class will consider larger questions prompted by the struggles Greek heroes faced, with themes including fate, death, failure, suffering, community values, honor, betrayal, redemption, and self-discovery.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 161  Demystifying Language: English Vocabulary

    Description:
    Seventy-five per cent of English vocabulary derives from either Latin or Greek. This course provides students with a system and analytical tools to demystify the process of building their English vocabulary. Students are given an introduction to English word formation (morphology) and principles of semantic change, as well as to history of the English language, while mastering a large body of word elements based in Latin and Greek. The course builds general linguistic awareness while increasing students English vocabulary and ability to understand unknown words at sight. Attention is given to academic, scientific and medical terminology.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 175G  Athenian Democracy

    Description:
    The Athenians of the fifth century BC were the first to develop a form of government that allowed all citizens to participate in decision-making. This course examines the historical developments that led to this democracy and its fruitful consequences in art, comedy, and philosophy. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for CORE C110 (Cultural History), but not for both. A student may not receive credit for both CLSICS 175G and CORE 120.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 180  Poets, Warriors and Sages: The Greeks

    Description:
    Through consideration of significant figures in Greek literature, history and philosophy, this course introduces students to the major features of the culture of Ancient Greece and to the prominent place of Greek ideas in the Western tradition. The course focuses on critical reading of ancient sources and incorporates analytical writing focused on the reflection of social structures in Greek literature.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 212G  Women in Ancient Greece

    Description:
    This course will introduce students to depictions of women in visual, literary, and documentary sources from Ancient Greece. We examine the roles women played in religion, medicine, society, and the family. We also consider philosophical inquiries into the role of men and women and look at the influences of slavery and war in Greek society.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 230L  Ancient Egypt

    Description:
    A survey of the history, art, archaeology, and religion of ancient Egypt. CLSICS 230L and HIST 230L are the same course.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 239L  Hindu Myth and Narrative: the Epics and Puranas

    Description:
    This course studies Hinduism through its narrative literature, especially the great epics (the Mahabharata and Ramayana) and mythological texts (Puranas - the "Ancient Books"). Through stories of gods, devotees, villains, and heroes, the course explores the development of significant themes in the Hindu tradition, from ethics and philosophy to asceticism and religious devotion. An important focus of the course is the enduring cultural significance of myth and the epics of South and Southeast Asia, as retold through the ages in a variety of languages, cultural contexts, and media, including classical and vernacular texts, the oral tradition, drama, dance, and cinema.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 262L  Greek Art and Architecture

    Description:
    An introduction to the art and architecture of ancient Greece, from the Late Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, with special attention to social and cultural contexts. Through careful study and analysis of key works we will explore the visual codes and cultural expectations that informed their original creation and reception, as well as the qualities that have contributed to their enduring influence and prestige. ART 262L and CLSICS 262L are the same person.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 270  The Life and Works of Julius Caesar

    Description:
    Julius Caesar has been called the best-known ancient Roman. Not only was he Romes greatest general, he has been considered among the finest Latin writers and surpassed by very few Roman orators. Yet he was a man of contradictions who aroused violently different reactions. This course will explore the biography and works of Julius Caesar from several different vantage points and through many different kinds of sources; his own written works; the archaeological evidence of his buildings, coinage, and statues; the writings of his contemporaries and successors; the views of modern scholarship; and the poets and playwrights who have given us their own versions of Caesar.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 271  Paganism and Christianty

    Description:
    Through texts and documents, as well as art and archaeological remains, this course examines the form, experssion and practice of religious life int he ancient Greeco-Roman and Judeo-Christian world, with particular emphasis on cross-cultural borrowings and adaptations.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 278  Cities of Vesuvius: Pompeii and Herculaneum

    Description:
    A survey of the art, architecture and social history of Pompeii and Herculaneum, the cities destroyed by the volcanic eruption of Vesuvius on August 24, AD 79.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 280  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics in the field of classical studies. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 281  Greek Civilization

    Description:
    A consideration of the major periods of Greek civilization through the reading of literary masterpieces supplemented by a text and lectures on cultural and historical backgrounds. Discussion of Homer, the tragedians (Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides), Aristophanes, Plato. Introduction to archaeological and artistic materials.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 282  Roman Civilization

    Description:
    A consideration of the major periods of Roman civilization through the reading of literary masterpieces supplemented by a text and lectures on cultural and historical backgrounds. Discussion of Cicero, Catullus, Virgil, Ovid, Petronius (Rome). Introduction to archaeological and artistic materials.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 284  Greek and Roman Mythology

    Description:
    A survey of the myths of ancient Greece and Rome, this course introduces students to accounts of creation, myths of the gods, and stories of the heros. We also consider the literary, artistic and religious dimensions of myth. Readings include Homer, Hesiod, the Homeric Hymns, selected tragedies, and Ovid's Metamophoses.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 287  Women in Greek Society and Literature

    Description:
    Readings in English translation of works of Greek literature dealing with women and their place in society. Particular attention is given to the social, historical, religious and economic forces that shaped gender roles in Greek society, and to the gulf between the roles of women in society and their images in literature. Not open to students who have taken CLSICS G212.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 288  Image and Reality: The Women of Rome

    Description:
    Readings in English translation of works of Roman literature dealing with women and their place in society. Consideration of the social structures and forces that affected gender roles in Roman society. Particular attention is given to typologies of women in Roman literature. Not open to students who have taken CLSICS G215.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 289  Rome in Hollywood

    Description:
    This course focuses principally on the treatment of Rome in American films. It compares ancient sources with their adaptations into film. The ways Romans change in the transition from page to screen furnish clues to America's view of itself, providing a case study of how ideology distorts history.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 290  Lovers, Slaves, and Shipwrecks: The Origins of the Novel

    Description:
    Novels of adventure, love, fantasy, travel, and social satire originated among the Greeks and Romans. The best known examples from antiquity are the Satyricon of Petronius and The golden Ass of Apuleius, but novels continued to be written in Latin well into the eighteenth century A.D., and were hugely popular. This course will introduce students to this long tradition. The course will focus on deep shifts in gender roles and sexuality, cultures, ethnicity, multiculturalism, fantasy, and science fiction.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 291  Sport and Spectacle in Greece and Rome

    Description:
    This course will examine the competitive games of antiquity-especially athletics, chariot racing, and gladiatorial combat-and analyze the place they had in the religious and cultural lives of Greeks and Romans. Topics include athletic training, the Pan-Hellenic festivals, praise poetry, prizes, professionalism, nudity, the participation of women, amphitheaters, and the cult of violence in Rome.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 292  Alexander the Great and His Legacy

    Description:
    At age twenty, Alexander became king of Macedonia; at age thirty-three, he died the master of an empire that stretched from Greece to India. This course explores the personality that shaped his achievements, his self-presentation, the responses of conquered people to overwhelming power, and cultural identity among Greeks, Macedonians, Persians, and Egyptians.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 294  Magic and Science in Greece and Rome

    Description:
    Magic and science constitute two competing ways of understanding and manipulating the natural world. Topics in this course include: astrology, witchcraft, necromancy, curses, erotic magic, voodoo dolls, legal restriction on magic, the philosophical basis of scientific thought, mathematical contribution of Euclid and Archimedes, Hippocrates and the emergence of medicine, scientific methods as shaped by Plato and Aristotle, natural development vs. intelligent design, Eratosthenes' measurement of the globe, the astronomical theories of Aristarchus and Ptolemy, military technology, and Christian hostility to science.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 301L  Ancient Greek History

    Description:
    This course provides a survey of the origin, rise and development of ancient Greek civilization from the arrival of the Greeks in Europe until the death of Cleopatra (approximately 1600-30 BC). Emphasis is placed on the rise of the Greek city-state and the spread of Greek culture to the East. CLSICS 301L and HIST 301L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 302L  Roman History

    Description:
    This course focuses on the Roman state from its origins until the triumph of Christianity from about 700 BC to 300 AD. Republic and Empire receive equal attention. CLSICS 302L and HIST 302L are the same course.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 303L  The Archaeology of Ancient Greece

    Description:
    This course provides a survey of Greek archaeology and history from the Bronze Age through the Classical Era. Students are introduced to the methods and aims of archaeology. The course begins with the Minoan and Mycenaean eras; the Dark Age and emergency of the full Hellenic era are treated, with emphasis on the city-states of the Greeks. The course makes extensive use of images and surveys the art and architecture of the Greeks in the context of primary literary sources. CLSICS 303L and HIST 303L are the same course.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 304  Bronze Age Aegean Archaeology

    Description:
    This course will cover the Aegean world from the beginnings of human history to the emergence of the language, cities and cultures commonly known as Greek in the 8th century BCE. We will focus especially on the archaeology, art, architecture, economy and societal trends of the Minoans and Mycenaeans.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 306L  The Archaeology of Ancient Rome

    Description:
    This course provides a methodological approach to roman archaeology as a key to understanding the history and culture of Rome and its empire from the city's origins in about 750 BC through the height and decline of Roman civilization during the first through fourth centuries AD. The course makes extensive use of images and surveys the art and architecture of the Romans in the context of primary literary sources. CLSICS 306L and HIST 306L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 327L  Hellenistic Art and Culture

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the Hellenistic period--the three centuries between the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC and the defeat of Cleopatra at Actium in 31 BC--particularly primarily through a close examination of the visual arts. Hellenistic art and architecture are examined in their political, social, religious, and multi-cultural contexts, in order to arrive at a fuller portrait of the age. ART 327L and CLSICS 327L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 375  Greek and Roman Tragedy

    Description:
    This course provides a survey of the tragic drama of fifth-century Athens, including the works of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides. Focus in on both artistry and social, historical and cultural context, including the interplay between the universal and the culturally specific. Performance conventions, literary genre, and the subsequent tragic tradition (especially Seneca in Rome) are also studied.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 376  Greek and Roman Comedy

    Description:
    The origins of Western comedy in Greece and Rome. We will read selected works of Aristophanes, Menander, Plautus and Terence, and compare them with Euripidean tragedy and later adaptations.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 383  Heroes, Wars and Quests

    Description:
    The Iliad and Odyssey of Homer, the Aeneid of Virgil; intensive study of the background, meaning, and influence of ancient epic poetry, with some attention to minor ancient epics and developments of epic poetry in later periods.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 385  Greek & Roman Religion

    Description:
    The ancients' belief in, and worship of, the ancient gods; oracles, mysteries, cults. Both primary sources (ancient authors in translation) and modern secondary sources are used.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 387  The Golden Age of Athens

    Description:
    An intensive study of the politics, society, culture, and philosophy of fifth-century Athens, which was revolutionized by the introduction of democracy. We also compare Athens with democratic institutions that have emerged in other cultures.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 388  The Golden Age of Rome

    Description:
    "All roads lead to the Aeneid": a consideration of Augustan literature, with attention to the literary, philosophical, and historical backgrounds contributing to its unique character. Readings in Cicero, Lucretius, Catullus, Virgil, Horace, the elegiac poets, and Livy.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 391  Greek and Roman Historians

    Description:
    Major Greek/Roman historians. Consideration of development of historical writing, historians' concepts of causation, literary techniques; primary and secondary sources.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 397  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course will cover selected topics in Classical Studies, taught by staff or visiting lecturers.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 478  Independent Study

    Description:
    Selected research topics organized in consultation with individual students.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 479  Independent Study

    Description:
    Selected research topics organized in consultation with individual students.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 490  Honors Program

    Description:
    Extensive reading in one broad segment of classical culture culminating in an honors thesis.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 491  Honors Program

    Description:
    Extensive reading in one broad segment of classical culture culminating in an honors thesis.   More Info

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  • CLSICS 495  Senior Seminar

    Description:
    This course will focus on the history, materials, and methods of the study of the ancient Greek and Roman world, preparing students to be informed consumers of scholarly work in a variety of areas of Classical Studies and to do research of their own in accordance with the accepted standards and conventions of the discipline. Weekly class meetings in the fall semester and independent work with a faculty advisor in both fall and spring will lead to the completion of the capstone paper.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • CLSICS 499  Honors Thesis

    Description:
    Upon invitation, students undertake extensive reading in a broad segment of classical culture culminating in an honors thesis.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA