Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > EEOS

Earth, Environmental & OceanSc

  • EEOS 101  The Global Environment

    Description:
    An analysis of the physical geographic environment including the globe, the atmosphere and ocean, climate, soils, vegetation, and landform. Positive and negative interaction of human beings with these aspects of the environment is examined where appropriate.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 102  World Regional Geography

    Description:
    An overview of world regions in terms of physical environment, human populations and the relationship between them. Topics with a focus on diversity are discussed from an international viewpoint and center on particular countries.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 104  Dinosaurs: A Natural History

    Description:
    This course considers dinosaurs, their evolution, and our understanding of their fossil record. Students will examine the geologic record and the tools used by paleontologists to determine: geologic ages and ancient environments; evolutionary history and extinctions; dinosaurian biology and behavior; and their survival as birds. Mechanisms of global change ranging from plate tectonics to asteroid impact will be discussed.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 109  Cultural Geography

    Description:
    Given the extent of today's era of globalization, it is more important than ever to understand human differences and similarities around the world. Within the broad discipline of Geography, cultural geographers focus on the complex inter-related causes and effects that produce diverse, as well as similar, cultures. Students will become familiar with the geographical perspective, basic concepts, vocabulary, and tools & techniques that form the foundations of cultural geography. Students will learn to use new knowledge and skills to examine why human cultures vary around the world in response to their physical and social environments. Through the selected topics in the syllabus, this course will guide students to study different dimensions of human characteristics, cultures, behaviors, and activities in a variety of global locations and to better understand how cultural differences develop.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 115  Environmental Geology

    Description:
    This course examines geological phenomena that adversely affect the human environment. Among the naturally occurring phenomena are earthquakes, weather, climate, volcanoes, tsunamis, landslides, and subsidence and erosion. Topics also include those geological impacts which are the result of human activities, such as subsidence, flooding, soil degradation, and hazardous material contamination.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 120  Introduction to Environmental, Earth and Ocean Sciences

    Description:
    This course offers a broad overview of the physical, chemical, biological, and geological principles underlying the environmental sciences. Students are introduced to natural processes and interactions in the atmosphere, in the ocean, and on land primarily through case studies at the coastal ocean-watershed interface. The course focuses on biogeochemical cycling of the elements, as well as on changes in these natural cycles with time, especially with recent anthropogenic influences. Along with its co-requisite lab, EEOS 121, this course will lay the foundation for understanding the key concepts of Environmental Sciences required for the EEOS major.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 121  Introduction to Environmental, Earth and Ocean Sciences Lab

    Description:
    This course offers a hands-on, experiential overview of physical, chemical, biological, geological laboratory and field skills needed for the environmental sciences, and serves as a core required course for EEOS majors. This lab is normally taken simultaneously with EEOS 120. Students will be introduced to field techniques, internet research, laboratory skills and data analyses. Experiences may include a Boston Harbor cruise, delineation of a local watershed, assessing air and water quality, running computer simulation models, and using GPS/GIS to locate and map spots on the UMass Boston campus.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 122  Introduction to Environmental Policy & Management

    Description:
    The inherent link between human activity and environmental impact highlights the importance of the social sciences in the examination of environmental systems, management and policy. This course introduces students to concepts and assessment methods vital to an understanding of environmental policy and management issues. Topics include environmental values and equity; resource allocation; environmental policy and politics; population dynamics; sustainable development; species and ecosystem-based management; habitat and food source protection; pollution management; and, land use. In-class activities and assignments will focus on three general education skills: critical thinking, critical reading and analysis, and effective communication.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 187S  EEOS Gateway Seminar I

    Description:
    This is a two-semester sequence, two credits each semester. Successful completion of the sequence will fulfill the students First-Year Seminar requirement. Course content will vary with instructor, but will focus on current issues in environmental, earth and ocean sciences. Using this approach, students will become increasingly familiar with and experienced in scientific discourse, the scientific method, and the interplay between the natural and social sciences that comprise EEOS. Within this framework, the course will address all the objectives of the UMass Boston First Year Seminar Program.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 188S  EEOS Gateway Seminar II

    Description:
    This is a two-semester sequence, two credits each semester. Successful completion of the sequence will fulfill the students First-Year Seminar requirement. Course content will vary with instructor, but will focus on current issues in environmental, earth and ocean sciences. Using this approach, students will become increasingly familiar with and experienced in scientific discourse, the scientific method, and the interplay between the natural and social sciences that comprise EEOS. Within this framework, the course will address all the objectives of the UMass Boston First Year Seminar Program.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 203  Field Trips in Environmental Science

    Description:
    The Environmental Science are very hands-on sciences based on large-scale, real-world situations that are difficult to replicate in a traditional laboratory. Students will travel to various locations to observe, sample and interact with the environment based on the theme of the trip. The goal of the experience is to introduce students to conduction field observations and develop environmental based problem solving skills through an immersion setting. Students will learn observations skills, sample techniques, and reasoning skills.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 210  Earth's Dynamic Systems

    Description:
    The basic principles of this course are embodied in the rock and hydrologic cycles. It examines the igneous, metamorphic, sedimentary, tectonic, and weathering systems of the rock cycle; and the runoff, glacial, ocean, groundwater, and atmospheric systems of the hydrologic cycle. A laboratory component includes one or more field trips to sites where geological phenomena can be viewed. Course is for majors only.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 225  Weather and Climate

    Description:
    This course investigates atmospheric processes forming the basis for weather patterns and climatic development on a global scale. Major topics include earth-sun relationships, heating and cooling of the atmosphere, atmospheric circulation, pressure patterns, air mass formation and frontal systems, episodic storms, vertical zonation of climate, and the Koppen System for evaluating and classifying climatic phenomena.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 226  Introduction to Oceanography

    Description:
    The world ocean covers approximately 71% of the Earth surface and 99% of its livable volume. This course explains how the ocean works starting from the histories of ocean explorations and early scientific knowledge rot ocean formation, currents and waves, effect of Earth's rotation, coastal and estuarine systems, marine habitats, nutrient-carbon cycle, human impacts and the role of oceans in climate change.   More Info

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  • EEOS 256  Health and Medical Geography

    Description:
    This course will introduce students to health and medical geography as an applied social science, emphasizing the role that place plays in human health and well-being, and updating the notion that geography is merely an inventory of places. Through basic geographic concepts and tools, this course will examine different aspects of health and medicine that underscore the interactions of humans with each other and with their physical and social environments. Topics include: the role that the physical and human environments play in health and medicine; an introduction to basic spatial analysis methods; map interpretation; models of diffusion; spatial aspects of health care delivery, health care policies, as well as environmental settings and resource issues.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 260  Global Environmental Change

    Description:
    This course examines the cross-disciplinary (astronomical, geophysical, chemical, and biological) interactions and cycles that cause global environmental change and the impact of human activities on natural earth-ecosystem processes, including global warming, pollution, deforestation, ozone depletion, and biodiversity reduction. Environmental change throughout Earth's history will be explored to better understand the effects of human-induced changes on the Earth System.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 261  Statistics for Environmental, Earth and Ocean Sciences

    Description:
    This course focuses on fundamental statistical concepts, methods in data analysis and applications to earth and geographic sciences. Topics include frequency distributions and graphic representations of data, measures of central location and spread, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, correlation and single and multiple variable linear regression.   More Info

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  • EEOS 265  Computer Applications in Geography

    Description:
    This course teaches the fundamentals of geographic applications of computers. Topics include components of a computer system and their functions; hardware requirements for geographic applications; operating systems; the cartographic roots of GIS; the structure and creation of geographic data; geographic information systems software for geographic applications; and the uses of computers in spatial analysis and map production.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 266  Building and Editing a Geodatabase Using ArcGIS 9.3

    Description:
    This is a hands-on beginner level course for Geographic Information System (GIS) users. The course covers basic concepts of relational database management systems (RDMS) and introduces the design of Geodatabase. The course explains how precision and spatial domain control the accuracy dn allowable extent of data stored in a geodatabase, how they are maintained, and how they affect the overall GIS environment. Students will be able to build and edit a Geodatabase using ArcGIS 9.3 at the end of the class.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 267L  Introduction to Coastal Biological Systems

    Description:
    This course will survey coastal marine habitats in terms of the organisms that inhabit these regions; the biological processes that dominant within those environments and the impacts of that habitat on humans. The objectives of the course will be for the students to gain an appreciation and understanding of the diversity and function of coastal marine systems in terms of the biological organisms and biological processes that are found there. EEOS 267L and ENVSTY 267L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 270  Cities and the Environment

    Description:
    This course introduces spatial analyses of cities to provide a broader understanding of their historical and current role. Major topics include the application of different geographical perspectives, why and where cities developed, the evolution of cities, how urban function and culture determines their spatial organization, how the economy and transportation drives the change in land use in urban areas, and urban areas in the 21st century.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 280  Global Society and the Environment

    Description:
    This course examines the spatial distribution of economic activities at local, national, regional & global scales and introduces the inter-related causes-and-effects on the economic use and organization of space. Major topics include the spatial distribution of the major economic sectors, the historical geography of capitalism, the city as an economic node, colonialism and globalization, the geography of the recession, the economy and the environment, and the location of informal economies.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 281  Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

    Description:
    This course is concerned with computer handling of spatial data. It covers essential elements of a GIS, hardware requirements, GIS software, data acquisition, data structures, spatial databases, methods of data analysis and spatial modeling, and applications of GIS in solving a variety of environmental and economic problems.   More Info

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  • EEOS 298  Pacific Rim Geography

    Description:
    This course takes an interpretive look at China and other East Asia countries such as Japan, and Korea in terms of changing attitudes toward urban life. City and suburbs are experienced as the product of planning and development decisions informed by cultural and economic forces, and in relationship to utopian and pragmatic efforts to reinterpret urban traditions in search of American alternatives. Topics include: persistent ideals such as housing forms attitudes toward public and private space; the rise of suburbs and suburban sprawl; cycles of disinvestment and renewed interest in urban centers; and impacts of mobility and technology on settlement patterns.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 299  Environmental Science Methods and Practice

    Description:
    This class is a general introduction to the practice of environmental science. The course provides students with an overview of the scientific method and process, particularly within the context of coastal environmental science. Students will learn the steps of crafting scientific hypotheses, research design, experimentation, data collection, data analysis, interpretation, and presentation. The course includes an introduction to the tools and methods used in the field and laboratory to collect and analyze environmental samples and the application of statistical analysis to these data. Students also learn how to search and review primary literature.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 302  Geomorphology

    Description:
    A topical approach to the analysis of landforms and the processes responsible for their formation. Map and aerial photographic interpretation are used to demonstrate the relationship of underlying structure to destructive and constructive processes at various stages of landform development. Environmental, regulatory, and other applications are discussed.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 305  Hydrology

    Description:
    Hydrology is the science of dealing with the waters of the earth, their occurrence, distribution, circulation, and chemistry. This course introduces students to the physical science of hydrology in the context of its application to real world problems. Emphasis is placed on understanding the physical processes that form the water cycle (precipitation, evapotranspiration, runoff, infiltration, and groundwater flow).   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 312  Glacial and Quaternary Geology

    Description:
    The significance and effects of the last ice age. Causes of ice ages, ice dynamics, comparison of glacial events of North America to glacial events throughout the world and current investigations concerning ice ages are among the topics discussed. Controversies concerning scientific acceptance of ice ages, the mode of ice movement, and predictability of climate allow for insight into the present and ongoing development of a science.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 313  Oceans and Human Health

    Description:
    This course aims to introduce students to the evolving interdisciplinary filed of "Oceans and Human Health." Lectures will provide background information on human health, the physical environment, and oceanographic processes, presented through a case study approach that will demonstrate the inter-relationships among these three factors. The course will include such current topics as the impacts of global climate change, endocrine disruptors, harmful algal blooms (HABs), toxic dinoflagellates, waterborne and foodborne diseases, and the importance of natural products from the ocean. Impacts (to both humans and the ocean) and remedies will be emphasized.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 316  Coastal and Marine Pollution

    Description:
    This course will explore human impacts on coastal and marine ecosystems. Beginning with a brief introduction of coastal and marine ecology and methods for measuring impacts, the course will then investigate the major causes of environmental degradation to coastal and marine ecosystems. Major marine pollutant classes including metals, pesticides, and organic pollutants will be examined by reviewing sources, distribution in coastal ecosystems, toxicology of the pollutants to estuarine and marine organisms, and resulting effects to fisheries, marine communities, and human health. The impacts of nutrients loading, sewage outfalls, oil spills and dredging on environmental quality and the cascading effects on ecosystems will be discussed.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 324  Coastal Zone Management

    Description:
    This course is concerned with coastal environmental problems and their solutions. It discusses in general the identification of the component parts of the coastal zone and the development of appropriate policies for their management. Field trips to representative areas are required relative to Mass CZM.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 325  Introduction to Biological Oceanography

    Description:
    Biological oceanography is a field of study that seeks to understand what controls the distribution and abundance of different types of marine life, and how living organisms influence and interact with processes in the oceans. These include processes from those that occur at the molecular level, such as photosynthesis, respiration, and cycling of essential nutrients, to those that are large-scale such as effects of ocean currents on marine productivity.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 327  Coastal Geology

    Description:
    This course focuses primarily on abiotic and physical factors in shallow water coastal environments. Particular emphasis is given to detailed examination of Massachusetts. The course requires on or more field trips.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 336L  Ecosystems Ecology

    Description:
    This course will focus on the foundational principles of ecosystems ecology. We will focus on the flow of energy and materials through both the biosphere (plants, animals, and microbes) and the geosphere (soils, atmospheres, and oceans) and the role that humans are playing in altering these key fluxes. We will draw on examples from both terrestrial and marine systems to understand the underlying principles of ecosystem structure and function. BIOL 336L and EEOS 336L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 340  Planning and Land Use Law

    Description:
    A study of the law as it has developed and applies to the planning process and the regulation of land use in the United States, with emphasis on Massachusetts.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 344  Island Economy: Environmental Dimensions of Local Production and Consumption

    Description:
    Island economies often depend on energy and material goods imported from the mainland. This course examines island economic history and physical potential for self-sufficiency. The course includes examination of relevant economic theory, for example location theory, gains from trade, advantages of scale, and community economic development. History and theory will be combined with social considerations to make broad conclusions about the ecological economics of more self-sufficient island economies.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 345L  Natural Resources & Sustainable Development

    Description:
    This class introduces the economic approach to sustainable growth and economic development by, among other things, examining questions surrounding natural resource management. The first third of the course focuses on the role economics can and cannot play in examining natural resources issues, schools of thought concerning the extent to which natural resources are scarce, and what sustainable economic growth means. The second third of the class focuses on exposing you to the tools economists and policy decision makers use to examine natural resource issues. Finally, the final third of the course focuses on applying the concepts you have learned to specific natural resource issues. ECON 345L and EEOS 345L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 347  Mineralogy and Petrology

    Description:
    Physical, chemical, structural, and optical properties of minerals; description and identification of common rock-forming and ore minerals; mineral associations and introduction to classification of common rock types. Field trip. Offered Fall even years.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 349L  Economic Approaches to Environmental Problems

    Description:
    An introduction to the economist's approach to solving environmental problems. The course examines applicable economic theories, then uses them to develop a framework for analyzing a wide range of environmental issues. Topics include benefit/cost analysis; measurement of environmental damages; and current government approaches to solving air, water, and solid waste pollution problems. ECON 349L and EEOS 349L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 350  Quant Hydrogeology

    Description:
    This course reviews standard quantitative aspects of hydrogeology and then applies a series of computer models to a number of different hydrogeological situations. Field data from pump tests, slug tests, and contaminant flow are investigated with programs such as mudflow, graphic groundwater, rock ware, and aquifer test in order to ascertain important groundwater characteristics.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 355  Historic Environments

    Description:
    A description, evaluation, and analysis of present North American physical environments and how they have been altered by our urban-industrial evolution. The course focuses on the historical development of interactions among settlements, economic activity, resource exploitation, waste disposal, technologies and the natural setting, culminating in how we have arrived at our current altered or damaged environments. Several field trips are required   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 356  Natural History of Nantucket

    Description:
    This course is a field-based exploration of the natural history and ecology of the island of Nantucket, with an emphasis on the interplay between coastal, marine and land ecosystems. Students build on foundational principles of the environmental sciences through development and practice of observation, identification, and interpretation skills and the keeping of a refined naturalist field journal. Topics include natural community composition and structure, biographic concepts, ecological succession, identification and classification skills for flora and fauna (including an introduction to botanical keys, as well as extensive use of other types of field guides), and the history and philosophy of Natural History. Course format includes lectures, discussions, and a significant field component. No pre-requisites are associated with this course. It is open only to UMass Boston students admitted to the Nantucket semester program offered in collaboration with CAPS. The program serves junior and senior students across the environmental fields including CSM and CLA majors and as such the complete listing of course permutations that would meet pre-req requirements is not possible. All students admitted to the program are evaluated based on academic preparation (completion of minimum 30 credits including at least 1 introductory science course and mathematics course), faculty references, student application essays, and formal interviews.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 360  Computer and Analytical Cartography

    Description:
    Topics include cartographic design, cartographic transformations, digital data formats, software for automated cartography, generation of computer maps, and cartographic modeling.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 364  Environmental Management and Sustainability

    Description:
    This course examines current national environmental problems facing both private and non-profit organizations from a management perspective. These problems include hazardous materials and waste, clean air and water quality. The course also explores the relationship between environmental protection and health and safety issues such as biosafety and worker protection.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 372  Introduction to Remote Sensing

    Description:
    This is an introductory course on the principles and techniques of remote sensing. It covers the physical principles of electromagnetic radiation, remote sensing systems, interpretation of aerial photographs, satellite remote sensing data, thermal and radar imagery, and applications of remote sensing. Students cannot receive credit for both EEOS 370 and EEOS 372.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 375  Urban Planning

    Description:
    A case method approach to urban planning. Students are supplied with a standard "request for a proposal" for a master plan. As an end product, they must present and submit a proposal for review. Class work focuses on how to use the planning process to design a master plan and on various approaches to designing zoning ordinances and land-use controls.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 378  Ecosystem Management Law and Policy

    Description:
    This course examines environmental and natural resource management laws through an ecosystem law and policy lens. Ecological concepts are considered and assessed in light of the myriad challenges related to complex systems management. In light of the fact that most public policy, regulatory and market approaches to resource use and ecosystem stewardship focus on human behavior, socio-economic concepts are examined as well. Students participate in discussions of readings in the ecosystem management law and policy literature; select and critically review an environment or natural management program from an ecosystem management perspective, and present their findings to the class.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 381  GIS Applications and Spatial Databases

    Description:
    This course is designed to give students an overview of GIS applications, an understanding of spatial and relational database concepts, and the practical experience of using GIS to solve real works problems. The course will include both lecture and lab components. The lab will use ESRI's ArcGIS software, its extensions, and ArcSDE, as well as the database applications Microsoft Access 2003 and SQL*Plus. Students will complete a final project involving data collection, analysis and display.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 383  Water Resources Management: Principles, practices, and problems.

    Description:
    This course explores the global use of water across different sectors of the economy and the management of these resources. Specific attention will be paid to sustainable use of water resources. The course integrates the principles that underlie water resource management, the problems that have arisen, and some possible solutions for the future.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 384  Climate and Energy: Law, Policy, and Management

    Description:
    This course examines legal, public policy and management issues related to Climate Change as well as those related to the development of renewable energy. It begins with an international overview of the social-economic forces shown to influence climate change, the legal and economic mechanisms that have emerged to address such change and the evolving global energy portfolio (particularly efforts to develop renewable energy). Current laws as well as evolving energy and climate change associated policies and regulations will be considered. Students participate in discussion of readings in the climate change and energy management literature, select and critically review an environmental or energy program from a climate change management perspective, and present their findings to the seminar.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 385  Applied Hydrogeology

    Description:
    This course provides comprehensive coverage of ground water hydrology, from theory to practice, with application to issues of ground water supply, ground water quality, and ground water resource management.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 390  Changing Coastal Environments

    Description:
    This course will examine natural and anthropogenic processes affecting the coastal zone and nearshore environment. Environmental Science principles and their application to design and planning will be emphasized. Topics will include coastal ecosystem biodiversity and conservation, coastal wetland development, sediment movement in estuaries and long-shore, natural disturbances regimes including coastal storms, flooding, and erosion. Applications of ecological principles for landscape design, planning, restoration, recreation, management and conservation at regional scales will include stormwater management, hardened coastlines, sediment and toxics management, marsh restoration, energy development. No pre-requisites are associated with this course. It is open only to UMass Boston students admitted to the Nantucket semester program offered in collaboration with CAPS. The program serves junior and senior students across the environmental fields including CSM and CLA majors and as such the complete listing of course permutations that would meet pre-req requirements is not possible. All students admitted to the program are evaluated based on academic preparation (completion of minimum 30 credits including at least 1 introductory science course and mathematics course), faculty references, student application essays, and formal interviews.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 393  Ecophysiology and Conservation of Fishes

    Description:
    This course combines fundamental lessons on fish ecology and physiology with an applied conservation focus, centering on anthropogenic disturbances threatening biodiversity in today's aquatic ecosystems. After an initial review of the basic physical properties of aquatic environments, we examine the diversity and specialization of form and function among fishes, as well as basic lessons on reproduction and life history. Next we explore the physiological systems within fishes that enable an aquatic existence. Whenever possible, we integrate case studies on anthropogenic threats and their direct and/or indirect effects on physiology, fitness, survival and ultimately the conservation and management of different fish species. Students will be encouraged to think about how particular aspects of anatomy, physiology, and life history among the 28,000+ species of fish influence their relative ability to withstand specific conservation threats. This is a combined lecture and laboratory class. Students are required to register for both the lecture and laboratory section.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 402  Sedimentology & Stratigraphy

    Description:
    This course outlines the principles that govern sediment transport and accumulation that compose modern constructional features on the landscape. Students will learn how processes of transport and accumulation can be deciphered and the evolutionary history of a landscape determined. Geophysical, biological and lithological techniques will be highlighted.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 406  GIT Data Collection and Field Methods

    Description:
    This course has 3 components: lecture, lab, and field data collection. The course is conducted at the UMass Boston campus for the first 2 weeks and at the UMass Boston field station on Nantucket for the third and final week. The course covers basic Geographic Information Technologies (GIT) and applications used to research, map, and analyze landward and coastal phenomena.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 444  Cooperative Education Field Experiences

    Description:
    In this program majors are placed in paid work positions. Credit is awarded only to those who complete an approved learning prospectus, including working reports and a substantial research project. Note: No more than a total of 6 credits in E&GSCI 444 or E&GSCI 499 may be counted toward the major.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 460  Digital Image Processing in Remote Sensing

    Description:
    This course is concerned with the computer processing and analysis of remote sensing data. Topics include radiometric and geometric characteristics of remotely-sensed data, image processing systems, image restoration, enhancement techniques, thematic information extraction, classification accuracy assessment, and integration of remote sensing and geographic information systems.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 465  Environmental Modeling with Raster GIS

    Description:
    This course focuses on two different topics. The first topic is raster data models, their structure and function, and in particular, their use in a modeling context. The second topic is the use of modern structured design techniques for forming a basis for the correct design and implementation of geographic information system applications   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 472  Programming for Geospatial Analysis

    Description:
    This course is an introduction of the Interactive Data Language. IDL is widely used and powerful tool for viewing and manipulating big data, which are usually taken by various imagers. Students will learn the basics, commands, subroutines, loops, and applications of IDL. Also, with real images from various satellites, students will learn to use IDL for extracting useful information or data products for Earth Sciences studies.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 475  ArcObjects: Programming ArcGIS with VBA

    Description:
    ArcObjects components are the building blocks of the ArcGIS software suite and provide functionality that developers can use to build powerful GIS applications. This course introduces the ArcObjects libraries to Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) programmers and teaches how to develop custom applications and solutions that extend core ArcGIS functionality. The student will work with VBA development tools and the Customize dialog box and learn how to use the various available help resources. Course exercises address the ArcObjects VBA developer resources to create applications and tools that perform specific GIS tasks including map navigation, feature selection and rendering, spatial operations, data projection, data management, editing, geoprocessing, and map creation.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 476  EEOS Capstone- An Integraton of Natural and Social Environmental Sciences

    Description:
    This course fulfills the capstone requirement and is meant to be the final culminating experience for EEOS majors. The ma in goal of the course is to integrate natural and social science knowledge and approaches to environmental problems, drawing from students' own experiences and the information they obtained in EEOS 100-300 level courses in order holistically to address one or more current environmental issues or problems. Both the course topics and the approach taken to address these topics will vary depending on the instructor chosen for each semester   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 478  Independent Study

    Description:
    This course provides an opportunity for a qualified, advanced student to work on a specialized topic or research project under the guidance of a faculty advisor outside the traditional lecture/discussion/laboratory framework. Meetings between the student and faculty member take place during the project to define goals and expectations and to facilitate the work. In order for this course to count for the capstone experience, an appropriate integrative project (natural and social sciences) must be developed by the student, in consultation with his/her advisor, and pre-approved by the Department Chair prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 479  Independent Study

    Description:
    Study of a particular area of this subject under the supervision of a faculty member. Students wishing to register must do so through the department.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 480  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 488  Advanced Marine Geographic Information Systems

    Description:
    Advanced Marine Geographic Information Systems in a course on GIS principles, theories, and practices for marine environmental applications. It will focus on the fundamentals of marine GIS, spatial data, and spatial analysis by using real-world marine datasets and ESRI's ArcGIS software. Topics will include, but are not limited to, oceanographic data acquisition, habitat modeling, species distribution modeling, and marine spatial planning for conservation and human uses.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • EEOS 498  Honors in Environmental, Earth & Ocean Sciences

    Description:
    This is a research reading, analysis and writing course that will have as its ultimate goal the production of an honors thesis or work product consistent with the disciplines of earth, environmental and ocean sciences. Such projects would include topics related to GIS, remote sensing, urban or environmental planning, groundwater issues and other related topics. The project must demonstrate a high level of competency consistent with the Honors designation. In order for this course to count for the capstone experience, an appropriate integrative project (natural and social sciences) must be developed by the student, in consultation with his/her research advisor, and pre-approved by the department chair prior to registration.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • EEOS 499  Practicum

    Description:
    A work program opportunity for qualified department majors to obtain practical experience in an approved work position in the field of their interest and training. Students submit critiques of their experience and are supervised by departmental advisors.   More Info

    Offered in: