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UGRD > ENGL

English

  • ENGL 099  English Fundamentals

    Description:
    English 099 is a basic reading and writing course for students whose writing placement tests indicate that they need extensive work in college composition. The course introduces students to the methods and materials of academic writing. Journal writing, collaborative writing, marking and glossing texts, discussing student papers in class, and revising are some of the methods that instructors use.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 101  Freshman English I

    Description:
    English 101 is an introductory course in critical reading and writing that prepares students for working with the complex texts and ideas they will find in their college studies. English 101 teaches students to discover and shape their own perspectives in dialogue with challenging readings. Through carefully sequenced assignments, students are guided through various processes for constructing academic essays that may include journal writing, glossing texts, discussing student papers in class, peer reviewing, and especially revising. Readings and materials vary from section to section. Note: English 101 satisfies the first half of the College's freshman writing requirements.   More Info

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  • ENGL 102  Freshman English II

    Description:
    Freshman English 102 is a more advanced course in critical reading and writing than 101; it is intended to help students prepare for their upper-level courses and the Writing Proficiency Requirement. Through sequenced assignments, students learn to sustain inquiries on particular themes or issues and to treat subjects from different perspectives, including their own. Through frequent reading and writing assignments, students learn to analyze the structures of essays and arguments so they are able to develop informed responses to them. As in 101, drafting and redrafting are emphasized. One of the course papers will be a researched essay that builds on course themes and issues. Note: English 102 satisfies the second half of the College's freshman writing requirement.   More Info

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  • ENGL 110  Reading Like a Writer

    Description:
    Students will learn to understand, use, and refine the techniques used by creative writers. Through weekly readings and discussion, students will become acquainted with how individual works of literature produce their effects, focusing not so much on what a piece means, but how meaning is made. Classic and contemporary examples of the genres of poetry and fiction will be studies with the goal of understanding the ways writers imagine elements of language, structure, and process to create a fully developed work. Class work will include in-class writing, examinations, creative-writing assignments, and attendance at one poetry or fiction reading during the semester with the goal of producing a final portfolio of creative work.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 120  What to Read: Life-Changing Literature

    Description:
    If students could gather English professors in a room and find out what novels, stories, poets, and films they find most exciting, what would the students learn? This course offers an introduction to literature written in English, from medieval England to the present, exploring how literature inspires a deeper understanding of the self, others, and society. A team of English professors explain what literary works they have found to be most meaningful and important, offering students the opportunity to experience the life-changing power of literature. The text and the lecturer change every week, while students participate in a weekly discussion section. Lectures, discussions and writing assignments cultivate skills of active and open-ended interpretation, literary analysis, conceptual thinking, and the investigation of varied cultural forms.   More Info

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  • ENGL 125  From Crime to Sci-Fi: Popular Literary Genres

    Description:
    This course examines the popular literary genres we use to categorize literature, including crime and detective fiction, science fiction, horror, action-adventure, western, and romance. Students in the course will address the thought-provoking questions raised by the different genre formulas that define literature: Why do we categorize literature into these different types? Do these different types limit or expand the reading experience? Do these different genres require a repetition of plot or do they encourage plot innovation? Students will define each genres key characteristics and historical development. Students will investigate what genre reveals about todays popular reading and writing experience.   More Info

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  • ENGL 126  Young Adult Literature

    Description:
    Young adult fiction is a booming segment of the book publishing industry. This course investigates why, in our increasingly sophisticated storytelling culture, we turn to novels that are supposedly aimed at a younger audience. What attracts readers of all ages to young adult literature? We will examine how these novels use well-known plot structures and literary devices to create compellingly artistic stories. We will also examine how young adult literature tackles difficult topics, such as race, class, gender, and sexuality, in stories that mange to be both accessible and deeply thought provoking in their portrayals of diversity. Although this class features young adult literature, it has a heavy reading load and a fast-paced reading schedule.   More Info

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  • ENGL 135  American Stories

    Description:
    This course asks essential question about American literature: What does it mean to be American? How do we tell stories about who we are? Have those stories remained the same or have we changes? How do we define ourselves over time? Students in "American Stories" will encounter the classic and contemporary narratives that define American literature and culture. From Benjamin Franklin to Junot Diaz, students will read across genres, historical periods, and perspectives. Themes might include the mythology of the American Dream, particularly the American emphasis on individualism, and the place of the U.S. in global context. In addition to attending lectures, students will write brief weekly reflections and participate in discussion sections.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 180G  Women between Cultures

    Description:
    This course examines issues facing women balancing more than one cultural tradition as they navigate family expectations, gender roles, and schooling in the US. Participants read and write about literature and autobiographical accounts by multicultural women as well as research by educators, social scientists, and historians in order to explore their own paths between cultures.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 181G  Literature and the Visual Arts

    Description:
    This is a course about the artistic aspects of literature. Students consider the nature of art-what it is, what it does, why it matters. The course analyzes a variety of works drawn from three genres-the short story, poetry, and drama. Topics include censorship, public funding for the arts, and contemporary critical theory.   More Info

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  • ENGL 183G  Literature and Society

    Description:
    Introduction to the ways in which literary works represent a particular aspect of society, such as work, education, aging, or war. Close analytical reading of literary works with special attention to a writer's social milieu and choices of form (including figurative language and representations of speech), and how readers in varying social contexts have read and used the work.   More Info

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  • ENGL 184G  Technology and the Soul

    Description:
    A contemporary focus on the pervasive effects and influence of electronic technology on our lives. This course looks briefly at the past and ponders the future through fiction and non-fiction, group projects, and guest speakers with diverse views on this subject.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 185G  Literature and Film

    Description:
    An introductory examination of the relationship between moving pictures and the written word. Students will study how filmmakers and writers construct narrative, and how stories have been adapted across media. Other topics may include the following: the different ways that literature and film have dealt with the problem of realism, the use of iconic and symbolic modes, and the political implications of film.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 188G  Literature, Medicine, and Culture

    Description:
    A consideration of the humanistic aspects (the human factor) in medicine. Readings will include works from the perspective of both patients and medical professionals in order to focus on those areas of medicine that challenge our ideas about what we think we want from medical research and practice in the twenty-first century.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 189G  War in Literature

    Description:
    A study of the ways in which literary works have dealt with the problem of representing the terrors of war. Attention will be paid to the ethical and aesthetic issues particular to the depiction of war in variety of media, such as novels, short stories, poetry, a graphic novel, film, and journalism.   More Info

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  • ENGL 200  Understanding Literature

    Description:
    This course offers guided practice in the close reading of three major literary genres-poetry, fiction, and drama-with works to be drawn from various historical periods. (A fourth genre may be added at the instructor's discretion.) The course explores the distinctive features of each genre, along with the concepts and terminology necessary to understand it accurately and communicate about it effectively. Close reading is integrated with aesthetic and evaluative responses to the literary works. A bridge to Literary Studies II (ENGL 300) is provided through focused study of at least one work from a biographical, historical, cultural, or other perspective. This course requires intensive writing.   More Info

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  • ENGL 201  Five British Authors

    Description:
    Representative works by five of the most important writers from the fourteenth to the nineteenth century, studied as introductions to philosophical and humanistic studies, explored as reflecting and shaping the leading ideas, assumptions, and values of their ages. Works by Chaucer, Shakespeare, and other authors such as Milton, Swift, and Austen, with films and background lectures on the philosophical and historical contexts of the works and their authors. Instruction in analytical reading and writing is provided.   More Info

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  • ENGL 202  Six American Authors

    Description:
    The achievements of American literature in articulating the American mind is illustrated by works from some well-known American writers-Thoreau, Dickinson, Faulkner, for example-as well as from those who deserve to be better known, such as William Wells Brown, Kate Chopin, Zora Neale Hurston.   More Info

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  • ENGL 203  Writing Craft/Context/Design

    Description:
    This course introduces students to rhetorical, literary, and critical approaches to studying and producing writing as they play out across a range of contexts in print and digital media, in the workplace, in journalistic and artistic venues, and in academic settings. The course will also pay attention to the ole of editing and publishing in text production. Framing writing in terms of genre, purpose, audience, and compositional practice, the course will introduce students to aspects of writing that span different situations: collaborative writing, visual and verbal design, and research practices. Other topics include learning about the range of career opportunities in English studies and primary and secondary research methods.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 210  Introduction to Creative Writing

    Description:
    An introduction to the arts through the medium of writing as well as reading poetry and fiction. Student writing is submitted weekly and discussed in class.   More Info

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  • ENGL 211  Creative Writing: Poetry

    Description:
    An introduction to the writing of poetry for students who may or may not have had prior experience. Students read poetry as a basis for learning to write it, and class discussion focuses both on assigned readings and on student work. Individual conferences with the instructor are also required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 212  Creative Writing: Fiction

    Description:
    An introduction to the writing of fiction for students who may or may not have had prior experience. Students read fiction as a basis for learning to write it, and class discussion focuses both on assigned readings and on student work. Individual conferences with the instructor are also required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 216  Reading and Writing Journalism

    Description:
    This introductory course provides students with a foundation in the art of journalism with an emphasis on critical reading and writing. Throughout the semester, students read classic and contemporary works by prize-winning journalists and produce and analytical responses that consider these works with respect to critical debates in the field questions of objectivity, representation, reporting methods, and the public interest. Using these writers as models, the course covers principles of style, structure, audience, and genre, aa well as the legal and ethical frameworks that govern the journalistic profession. Through guided writing assignments, students are invited to try their hand at a range of journalistic genres, such as news reporting, profiles, and editorials. This course welcomes students of all levels; no previous experience in journalism is expected or required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 221L  Introduction to Asian-American Writing

    Description:
    A study of prose works by American writers of East Asian, Southeast Asian, and South Asian descent. In discussing texts and current issues in the field of Asian American literary studies, students consider the ways in which discourse determines identity and the responsibilities of writers-to themselves as artists and to their communities, whether defined by race or gender. ASAMST 221L and ENGL 221L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 225  Graphic Novels

    Description:
    This course offers an introduction to the study of image and text through an analysis of selected graphic novels. The course investigates a fascinating range of relationships between images and words, as well as the roles these relationships play in our language and in our ways of thinking about story-telling, truth, memory, identity, and power.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 230  King Arthur

    Description:
    This course examines the narrative of Englands greatest king through the comparative study of media (manuscript, print, film, and television) and genres (poems, novels, screenplays). Students will examine how the Arthur legend contributes to our understanding of the humanities and literary production. Topics to be explored include the human fascination for quest-narratives, the transnational contexts shaping popular mythology, and the interpretation of cultural and religious symbols in the humanities.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 235  African-American Literature

    Description:
    A survey of works by African-Americans with attention to the interaction of musical, oral and literary forms in Black expression, slave songs, blues lyrics, sermons, and works by Hughes, Wright, Baraka, and others.   More Info

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  • ENGL 236  Literary Boston

    Description:
    This course offers a survey of major literary works written by Greater Bostonians who defined an enduring sense of place. The writers examined in the course - poets from Phillis Wheatley to Robert Lowell, essayists from Ralph Waldo Emerson to Michael Patrick MacDonald, and novelists from Nathaniel Hawthorne to Dennis Lehane have evoked a landscape of imagination and purpose, exploring Greater Bostons heights and depths. The course examines how, for nearly four centuries, the city and its surrounding sphere of influence have stood as a contradictory emblem of American idealism and its loss.   More Info

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  • ENGL 245  Global Voices

    Description:
    This course provides a critical introduction to literature written in what has become arguable the globe's primary language of commerce, government, law, and education. The course examines fiction writers, playwrights, and poets from locations outside England and North America who have claimed the English language as their own and used it with energy and creative verve. Readings will survey works in English from Africa, Asia, and Australia, among other places, with attention o their heterogeneity and complexity. Key topics include identity, nationalism, gender, feminisms, memory, conflict, exile, nostalgia, postcoloniality, and citizenship.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 250  The Monstrous Imagination in Literature

    Description:
    Literature not only creates monsters, but seems to enjoy the imaginative leap needed to make "real" the obviously unreal monster. Why does literature uses its imaginative power its ability to move beyond reality & to envision figures that are non-human, abnormal, or uncivilized and are disturbing, disruptive, or horrific in form? If we examine these figures closely, one of the things that makes them both very human and very monstrous is their imaginative excess: they often have an imagination that is out of control, overly-rebellious or engaged in too-powerful thinking. Thus, this class argues that literature uses the figure of the monster to question the benefits, powers, and downfalls of the imagination. By asking you to question why the imagination creates monsters, this class asks you to question the nature of the imagination itself; especially the imagination that creates and reads literature.   More Info

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  • ENGL 252  Film I: Foundations of Cinema Studies

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of film analysis and to topics and approaches in cinema studies. We will devote several weeks to building a precise vocabulary for describing mise-en scene, cinematography, editing, and sound in film with the goal that you will learn to trace the function of film style within a scene and across a film. We will explore various modes of film-making a introductory critical methods related to genre, authorship, and cinema's social function. We will engage familiar films in unfamiliar ways and learn to work through films that may at first seem perplexing. With these skills, you can enhance your everyday viewing of film (and television), become a more discerning consumer of visual discourse,and most importantly, begin to critically engage with film.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 258  Introduction to World Cinema

    Description:
    This course offers an introduction to the study of world cinema as form of artistic and cultural expression. Together we will acquire and develop a greater understanding of and more informed appreciation for international film, learning to interpret, analyze, and reflect on this important global art from. This course will emphasize several ways of approaching world cinema; its creation within a cultural context; its representation of diverse peoples and their values, beliefs, and ideals; its depiction of events-past, present, and future; its use of clearly-defined cinematic techniques; its narrative or storytelling structure; its connection to specific film genres; its place in the trajectory of film history; its reflection on larger themes of the human condition. This course will also explore the place of film in contemporary world culture. How does international cinema provide a means of understanding other cultures? What function does film have: is it an art, entertainment, or profit-making product? Does film offer an escape from reality, a critique of reality, or a heightened experience of reality?   More Info

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  • ENGL 259  Sexuality in Literature & Film

    Description:
    This course offers an introduction to sexuality studies through an interdisciplinary approach to literature and film produced in English. Attention will be paid to the way that different cultures have thought and talked about sexuality, as well as how they have experienced and performed it. Key concepts include gender socialization, social constructionism, performance theory, and the disciplining of bodies and sexual desire.   More Info

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  • ENGL 262G  The Art of Literature

    Description:
    This course explores and imagines the world of literature-the imagination as it finds creative expression in language. Why do we call some writing "literature"? What makes us label something "art"? Through fiction, poetry, and drama, participants learn about literary devices and terminology and develop an appreciation for the writer's craft. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing.   More Info

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  • ENGL 272G  The Art of Poetry

    Description:
    "If I feel physically as if the top of my head were taken off I know that it's poetry" (Emily Dickinson). Participants in this course read poetry, discuss poetry, write about poetry, and possibly write poetry in this introduction to the art and craft of poetry. Discussions cover such topics as slant rhyme, syllabics, synesthesia, free verse, the Elizabethan sonnet. This course may be counted towards the English major. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, oral presentation.   More Info

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  • ENGL 273G  The Art of Fiction

    Description:
    Introduction to themes and forms of fiction. Close analytical reading of stories and novels with special attention to an artist's historical and cultural milieu, and to an artist's choices of form (including thematic repetition and variation, narrative point of view, setting, characterization, plot and action, imagery, figurative language, and representations of speech). Emphasis on writing critical and interpretive papers. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for ENGL C204 (The Nature of Literature: Fiction), but not for both. Capabilities addressed: Reading, writing, critical thinking, information technology, oral presentation.   More Info

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  • ENGL 274G  The Art of Drama

    Description:
    Introduction to themes in drama. Close analytical reading of plays with special attention to context. Focus on character development, figurative language, setting, imagery and action. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for ENGL C203 (The Nature of Literature: Drama), but not for both. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing.   More Info

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  • ENGL 276G  The Art of Life Writing

    Description:
    Introduction to life writing. Close analytical reading of memoirs, personal essays, biographies and autobiographies with special attention to a writer's historical and cultural milieu, and to a writer's choices of form (including narrative points of view, setting, characterization, scene and summary, figurative language, and representations of speech). Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for CORE C120 (Controversy), but not for both. This course may count toward the major or minor in English. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, academic self-assessment, collaborative learning, information technology, oral presentation.   More Info

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  • ENGL 284  Language, Literacy and Community

    Description:
    This course is designed to be taken in conjunction with ENGL 285. It provides theoretical and practical foundations for teaching second language adult literacy. Course work considers participants' own language/literacy acquisition processes and practice as tutors. The course focuses on learner-centered approaches to teaching adult ESL/literacy.   More Info

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  • ENGL 285  Tutor Training: ESL

    Description:
    This course emphasizes the theoretical and practical issues in the teaching of ESL, thus providing tutors with a framework with which to view their own teaching and observation experiences. Readings and discussions address materials development, instructional techniques, and textbook evaluation. Open only to UMass Boston ESL tutors.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 293  Literature and Human Rights

    Description:
    This course focuses on literary expressions and representations of the desire for and the crises of human rights. The various literary genres (poetry, fiction, drama, memoir, and essay) evoke the yearning of peoples to be awarded the right to live in safety and with dignity so that they pursue meaningful lives, and these literary genres record the abuses of the basic rights of people as they seek to lead lives of purpose. This course will examine the ways in which the techniques of literature (e.g., narrative, description, point of view, voice, image) compel readers attention and bring us nearer to turn to human rights abuses and peoples capacities to survive and surmount these conditions.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 300  Intermediate Creative Writing Workshop

    Description:
    A creative writing workshop for students who have some experience in the writing of poetry, fiction, or drama. Class discussion focuses on student work, and individual conferences with the instructor are required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 301  Advanced Poetry Workshop

    Description:
    An advanced poetry workshop in which students practice and improve the poetic skills they have already begun to develop. Class discussion focuses on student work, and individual conferences with the instructor are required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 302  Advanced Fiction Workshop

    Description:
    An advanced fiction workshop in which students practice and improve the writing skills they have already begun to develop. Class discussion focuses on student work, and individual conference with the instructor are required   More Info

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  • ENGL 306  Advanced Nonfiction Writing

    Description:
    For serious writers in various nonfictional modes, such as description, narration, expository or informative writing, and written argument. While there is some emphasis on the philosophy of composition, everything read and discussed has a practical as well as a theoretical function. Sections of this course taught by different instructors vary in emphasis from the composing process to techniques of the new journalism, to technical writing, writing for prelaw students, techniques of research for the long paper and report. But all are conducted in small classes or workshops, all are concerned with informative or argumentative writing for advanced students, and all require the permission of the instructor for enrollment.   More Info

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  • ENGL 307  Writing for Print and Online Media

    Description:
    This is an advanced course where strong writers can gain proficiency in major types of writing for the public, focusing on journalistic stories. Assignments connect to real campus, job, and community events and situations, with the expectation that some writing will be publishable. In conjunction with English 308, this course provides a strong preparation for editors and writers in all settings.   More Info

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  • ENGL 308  Professional Editing

    Description:
    An intensive workshop in developing effective prose style for various kinds of writing, including reports, essays, and theses. Instruction covers advanced grammar, usage, editing, and proofreading, with special attention to problems of expression and style arising from complex ideas and argumentative logic. In conjunction with ENGL 307, this course provides a strong preparation for editors and writers in all settings.   More Info

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  • ENGL 309  Multimedia Authoring

    Description:
    In this hybrid digital workshop and studio course, students learn principles of media production, storytelling, and design across a range of audio-visual and web-based platforms. Through focused readings and discussions on documentary, design, and digital aesthetics, students examine creative works by professional artists and media producers and participate in regular critiques of students-made work. Classes include hands-on instruction in image-, audio-, and video-editing techniques and web design basics in a project-based, collaborative learning environment. Throughout the semester, students propose, edit, author, and design a series of original multimedia projects and produce a professional portfolio website of their creative work. This course welcomes students from all backgrounds; no previous experience with digital media production is expected or required.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 310  Literature and Journalism

    Description:
    This course explores how "fictional" literature and "factual" journalism influence each other's form and content. covering major developments in nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature in relation to innovations in newspaper culture, the course will examine how a work's material form and appearance shape its meaning. The course will investigate how literature and journalism share writing styles, such as sensationalism, and publishing modes, such as serialization. The course will also connect literary and journalistic writing to issues of gender, politics, and ethics.   More Info

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  • ENGL 319  English Epic Poetry

    Description:
    The history and theory of English epic and mock-epic poetry, with attention to the status of epic in modern times. Consideration of efforts to emulate Homer and Virgil, as well as issues of artistry and interpretation in English translations of ancient epics. Close reading of epics by three or four poets, such as the Beowulf-poet, Spenser, Milton, Pope, and Wordsworth.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 320  Memoir and Autobiography

    Description:
    A study of various kinds of American autobiography-such as spiritual autobiography and freedom narratives-from colonial to modern times, with attention to European forerunners from Augustine to Rousseau. Texts vary by semester, selected from such authors as Edwards, Franklin, Thoreau, Douglass, Jacobs, Moody, Washington, and Henry Adams, and more recent works by Hellman, Wright, Malcolm X, and Kingston.   More Info

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  • ENGL 321  Biography

    Description:
    A study of how biographies tell a life story, with attention to the problems of fidelity to the truth and appeal to the imagination. Selected texts share common themes which are approached differently, sometimes in several works about a single historical figure. Consideration is given to uses of differing source materials and to differing forms, including prose, drama, documentary, and fictionalized film.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 322  The Rise of the Novel

    Description:
    The emergence of the most popular and influential literary form of the past two centuries. The nature of the novel, its formal characteristics and social concerns, is traced in seven or eight major works by early artists in the novel, such as Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Austen, and Scott.   More Info

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  • ENGL 324  Short Story

    Description:
    A study of the short story, chiefly as a genre of this century. The course traces its development from nineteenth century origins, concentrating its reading on such American and Irish writers as Welty, O'Connor, Cheever, Lavin, Joyce, Hemingway, Montague, and considering as well the statements made by short story writers on the poetics of short fiction.   More Info

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  • ENGL 326  Stage and Page: Drama Before 1642

    Description:
    A study of English drama before and during Shakespeare's career emphasizing the development of comedy and tragedy as form and idea, this course provides a setting for the study of Shakespeare. Readings include selected episodes from the mystery cycles, a morality play, and works by such playwrights as Marlowe, Kyd, Tourneur, Webster, Greene, Dekker, Jonson, Beaumont, as well as a comedy and a tragedy of Shakespeare.   More Info

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  • ENGL 327  Stage and Page: Drama, 1660-1900

    Description:
    A study of drama in English since the reopening of the theaters at the Restoration of 1660. The development of comedy of manners from Wycherly and Congreve through Sheridan to Wilde and Shaw, and of tragedy from the early eighteenth century through the romantic era, through Ibsen and his followers, to the early twentieth century.   More Info

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  • ENGL 328  Stage and Page: Drama, 1900-Today

    Description:
    A study of 20th century American and British drama, including works in translation by influential playwrights abroad. Attention to themes, forms, styles, staging, and performance. Works by such authors as Ibsen, ONeill, Williams, Miller, Brecht, Beckett, Genet, Hansberry, August Wilson, Kushner, and Hwang.   More Info

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  • ENGL 329  Narrative in the Novel and Film

    Description:
    Emphasizing formal and stylistic renditions of 20th- and 21st-century narrative art, this course focuses on experimental aspects of fiction and film. The storytelling structures of fiction and film are compared through close attention to written texts, visual and graphic media, and critical readings. Materials include fiction by authors such as Woolf, Faulkner, and Coetzee, and films by directors such as Eisenstein, DeSica, and Resnais.   More Info

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  • ENGL 331  Satire

    Description:
    Readings from the classical period of satire. Aristophanes, Horace, and others raise issues about the nature, functions, and techniques of satire, its relations to intellectual attitudes, social criticism, and literary forms. Variations on the classical patterns and the role of satire in contemporary culture are seen in a range of later satiric works.   More Info

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  • ENGL 332  Comedy

    Description:
    Comic literature from different cultures and periods, ancient through modern, illustrates the recurrence of different comic modes: satire, irony, romantic comedy, comedy of manners, and comedy of the absurd. Essays about theories of comedy aid students in evaluating the literature and forming their own ideas about the nature of comedy.   More Info

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  • ENGL 333  Tragedy

    Description:
    The course explores both the changing and the enduring aspects of tragedy by examining tragedic works of different ages, from ancient Greece to modern times. Readings may include such works as Oedipus, Thyestes, Dr. Faustus, Macbeth, The White Devil, King Lear, Samson Agonistes, Desire Under the Elms, Death of a Salesman, and Glengarry Glen Ross examined alongside theories about the definition of tragedy, the nature of tragic action, the tragic hero, the tragic times, for example. Students are encouraged to evaluate concepts of tragedy based on class readings, formulating their own ideas about this important form of drama.   More Info

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  • ENGL 334  Science Fiction

    Description:
    A historical survey of a distinctive modern mode of fiction, including major works by such 19th- and 20th-century figures as Mary Shelley, HG Wells, Yevgeny Zamyatin, Olaf Stapledon, Alfred Bester, Ursula LeGuin, Octavia Butler, Joan Slonczewski, and Kim Stanley Robinson. The focus is primarily literary, though there may be a brief unit comparing literary and cinematic science fiction. Among the topics for consideration: science and scientists in fiction; history and the future; aliens and alienation; diversity in gender, race, culture, species; the physical environment of Earth and of other worlds.   More Info

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  • ENGL 335  Children's Literature

    Description:
    The study of literature for children, including criticism and the history of the development of literary materials written specifically for children. The works studied-by such authors as Lewis, Grahame, Wilder, and Milne-are explored in the context of the historical and cultural settings in which they were produced, and the texts are analyzed both as works of art and as instruments of cultural and didactic impact.   More Info

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  • ENGL 337  Short Novel

    Description:
    Readings in 20th-century short novels by authors such as Tolstoy, Joyce, Conrad, James, Wharton, Hemingway, Steinbeck, Roth, Wright, Hurston, Achebe, C Johnson, and Oates. Exploration of how the language of analysis and interpretation affects the ways we relate to texts. Attention to differences among genres: short story, the novella or short novel, and novel.   More Info

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  • ENGL 340  Literature and Visual Media

    Description:
    A comparison of two kinds of imaginative experience, with particular emphasis on the connection between the visual and verbal, the effects of formula and format, the standardization which results from technological methods of production and distribution to mass audiences. How are our lives different because of the pervasiveness of these new cultural habits?   More Info

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  • ENGL 341L  Gender and Film: Multidisciplinary Perspectives

    Description:
    This course is designed to encourage multidisciplinary analysis of gender, cultural representations, and film in the 20th and early 21st century. Among the topics that students will explore are: ethnographic film and gendered practices in ethnographic filmmaking; how ideologies of gender, "race," and class are constructed, disseminated, and normalized through film (documentary as well as "popular" film); Indigenous women and filmmaking in North America; femininities, masculinities, and power in the "horror film" genre; human rights film and filmmaking as activism. Students will view films made in diverse locations and reflecting multiple historical, political, and cultural perspectives and will explore the intellectual, political and social significance of film in their own lives.   More Info

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  • ENGL 343  Literature, Culture and Environment

    Description:
    A study of how late nineteenth- and twentieth-century, predominantly American, literature has dealt with the physical environment, concentrating on examples of narrative and nonfictional prose, as well as poetry. Special attention will be devoted to such topics as the relation between environmental experience and literary representation of the environment; the impact of cultural and ideological forces on such representation; the interrelation of the history of the physical environment and the history of literature and the arts; and the changing definitions of nature and wilderness as well as the values attached to these ideas.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • ENGL 345  Literature of the American South

    Description:
    A study of the literary renaissance of the American South from 1920 to the present in works by such authors as Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Warren, Ransom, Tate, Welty, Porter, Styron, O'Connor, Kenan, A. Walker, M. Walker, and S. Brown.   More Info

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  • ENGL 348  Native American Literature

    Description:
    This course examines some of the ways in which Native American writers express their cultural traditions through literature, with an emphasis on how histories of struggle and survival are reflected in both content and style. Readings include contemporary fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, as well as traditional stories and songs. Special attention is given to how these texts help us to better understand and explain the relationships between human beings and the natural world in Native American cultures, including concepts of power, systems of tribal thought and ethics, and culturally based ways of knowing. Background for guided discussion and discussion and study is provided through readings, slides and films.   More Info

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  • ENGL 350L  Asian-American Literary Voices

    Description:
    An advanced study of poetry, fiction, drama, and autobiography by Asian American writers to explore the complex interplay between constructions of ethnic identity and literary expression. Students engage with the highly diverse face of contemporary Asian America, probing its literature for emerging themes like diaspora, transnationalism, and sexuality and analyzing their impact on the U.S. literary landscape. ASAMST 350L and ENGL 350L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ENGL 351  Early African-American Literature

    Description:
    A study of the roles of early (1773-1903) African-American literature played in shaping American literary and cultural history. Through an examination of such writers as Wheatley, Equiano, Douglass, Jacobs, and Chesnutt, this course introduces students to foundational themes of African-American literature, from the black Atlantic and the trope of the talking book through the tragic mulatto and double consciousness.   More Info

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  • ENGL 352L  Harlem Renaissance

    Description:
    This course focuses on major texts of the Harlem Renaissance within contexts of modernism, history, and the development of an African American literary tradition. The course will examine how literature creates and represents real and "imagined" communities and will explore the diverse and often contradictory roles that literature plays in shaping, resisting, and reinforcing cultural discourses. AFRSTY 352L and AMST 352L and ENGL 352L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ENGL 353  Multiethnic American Literature

    Description:
    A study of poetry, fiction, and drama by Native American, African American, Asian American, Latino/a, and Jewish American writers from a comparative perspective, exploring similarities and differences among the writers in their aesthetics-how they use language to express themselves-and politics-how themes like immigration, resistance, empowerment, activism, heritage, gender relations, sexuality, and family manifest themselves in the works.   More Info

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  • ENGL 354  The Black Presence in American Literature

    Description:
    A study of 19th- and 20th-century literary texts by black and white writers who write with a significant consciousness of black people in American society, and of how blacks and "blackness" are used to illuminate whites and to conceptualize "whiteness" and its ideology. Authors may include Melville, Twain, Chopin, Mitchell, Faulkner, Ellison, Wright, Baldwin, Brooks, and Morrison.   More Info

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  • ENGL 355  African-American Poetry

    Description:
    A critical and historical survey of black poetry from its oral beginnings to the present, with emphasis on the Harlem Renaissance, or New Negro Movement, and the Black Arts Movement. Works by such major poets as Dunbar, Hughes, Brooks, Walker, Hayden, Baraka, Sanchez, Giovanni, Dove, S Brown, Harper,and Komunyakaa.   More Info

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  • ENGL 357  African-American Women Writers

    Description:
    The course considers content, form and modes of expression in prose, poetry and criticism by black women writers from the eighteenth century to the present. Readings include slave narratives, colonial and abolitionist writings, works from the Harlem Renaissance and by contemporary writers such as Bambara, Sanchez, Walker, and Brooks.   More Info

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  • ENGL 360  Arthurian Literature

    Description:
    A study of the evolution of the Arthurian materials (from the twelfth century to the present); their origins in history, legend and myth, their emergence in the major twelfth century romance cycles, and their adaptations by later ages; the examination of recurring characters and motifs to discover how the Arthurian legend has been adapted to reflect the different aesthetic and social values of different historical periods.   More Info

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  • ENGL 363  Modern American Poetry

    Description:
    American poetry from the beginning of the century to the end of World War II, focusing on the major works of Frost, Pound, Eliot, Williams, Stevens. Primary attention to the poems as formal works of art; secondary attention to historical, philosophical, and aesthetic contexts (e.g.: World War I, Einstein''s relativity and existentialism, Kandinsky and abstract art). Close analysis of particular poems as successful works in their own right and as exemplars of a particular writer''s thematic and stylistic concerns.   More Info

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  • ENGL 364  Post-1945 American Poetry

    Description:
    A comprehensive overview of living American poets, plus intensive readings in selected writers such as Ashbery, Levertov, Ginsberg, Lowell, Wilbur, Ammons, Baraka, Plath, Merwin, Duncan, and Rich. Discussions of individual poets on their own merits and as exemplars of current poetic schools.   More Info

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  • ENGL 365  The British Novel and the Nineteenth Century

    Description:
    A study of social, technological, and cultural changes in nineteenth-century Britain as reflected in the large-scale novel of social life that reached its peak of popularity as a literary form in several modes including historical fiction, romance, and realism. Novels by such authors as Scott, Austen, the Bront Thackeray, Dickens, Eliot, Gaskell, Hardy, Meredith, and Conrad.   More Info

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  • ENGL 366  Women and Men in Nineteenth-Century Literature

    Description:
    A study of men and women and their relationships in nineteenth century literature, mainly British and American, with special emphasis on the issues of masculine and feminine sexual identity and sexual stereotypes, and the social position of men and women as these are treated in popular culture and in serious literary works.   More Info

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  • ENGL 368  Modern American Fiction

    Description:
    A study of significant works of American fiction written in the first half of the 20th century. Major American modernists-such authors as James, Wharton, S Crane, Cather, Hughes, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Hurston, and Faulkner-helped to define the "American century" and to demonstrate the sustained achievement of modern American fiction.   More Info

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  • ENGL 369  Post-1945 American Fiction

    Description:
    A study of significant works of American fiction written since 1950. These works, in form and substance, reflect America's debate between those who see "good in the old ways" and those who try to "make it new." Emphasis upon the variety of fictional voices and identities in works by authors such as Banks, Carver, Ellison, Morrison, and Updike.   More Info

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  • ENGL 370  Reading Sexualities: Queer Theory

    Description:
    This course brings the analysis of sexual difference to the center of cultural critique, revealing the web of sexual ideology that underlies texts and everyday life. Through the close reading of literary works and classic texts of queer theory, the course deconstructs the identity categories that usually shape this conversation, including not only 'gay' and 'lesbian,' but also 'heterosexual,' 'man,' and 'woman.' This course offers a survey of queer criticism from foundational works in the field to exciting new directions that help us to identify queer forms of time, emotion, and literary expression.   More Info

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  • ENGL 371  The Adolescent in Literature

    Description:
    An examination of works featuring adolescents as protagonists, with attention to why American literature in particular has celebrated the adolescent (and pre-adolescent) experience. Consideration of assumptions held about adolescence, about authorial intention, about literary analysis, and about education. Authors may include Twain, Salinger, Updike, Eugenides, Angelou, Baldwin, Bambara, Morrison, and Allison.   More Info

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  • ENGL 372L  American Women Writers and American Culture

    Description:
    This course examines the significant contribution that women writers have made to the creation and development of an American national literature and culture. Points of emphasis include studying representative writers from different historical periods; examining the structures, forms, themes, concerns, and cultural contexts of individual works; and examining the relation of women's writing to American culture. AMST 372L and ENGL 372L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ENGL 373  Working-Class Literature

    Description:
    This course studies literature which takes the working class as its subject. It examines questions such as the following: how is the literary work affected by the relationship of the author to the working class? What have been the traditional literary forms for treating working class subjects and what is their effectiveness? What are the consequences of politics or ideology in literary works?   More Info

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  • ENGL 374  Literature and Society, 1760-1850

    Description:
    A study of how popular culture reflected broad social and cultural changes in Britain. Emphasis given to expanding empire, technological advances, and increasing urbanization, which created a rapidly modernizing culture with changing class structures and literary audiences. Attention to how authors from Burns to the Bronts engaged and theorized the resulting pressures.   More Info

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  • ENGL 375  Literature of the American Civil War

    Description:
    Despite Whitman's declaration that "the real war will never get in the books," American literature has produced a diverse and contested archive of depictions of the Civil War. Rather than evaluating whether "the real war" has ever been captured, the course will ask instead how Americans have imagined the war and why. It will focus on the gender and racial politics of depictions of the home front versus the battlefield, the cultural work of the intersectional "romance of reunion" and "plantation school" dialect writing, and the romanticized "Old South" in fiction from the 1860s through the twenty-first century.   More Info

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  • ENGL 376  Literature and the Political Imagination

    Description:
    The course studies ways authors use imaginative literature to respond to political situations and to voice moral and political beliefs. It probes such themes as war and conquest, wealth, race, sex, but its main emphasis is on language and organization and this emphasis requires close analysis of style and structure. Authors may include Dickens, Forster, and Conrad, Dos Passos, Hansberry, Baraka, and Malraux, Brecht, and Silone.   More Info

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  • ENGL 377  Literature of the Americas

    Description:
    This course aims to provide students with an understanding the relationship between U.S. and Latin American literature. The course focus varies each semester, and may survey nineteenth-century nationalism in their parallel development; literary modernism between the two world wars; and/or the post-World War II period, with the creation of Latin American boom literatures in the 1950s and the 1960s. The point of the course is not simply to compare and contrast each of these literatures in order to mark the similarities between them, but rather to determine why these literary traditions should be examined together in the first place. Critical approaches developed in the course will highlight questions of interpretation, literary history, and translation.   More Info

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  • ENGL 379  Special Topics in English and American Literature I

    Description:
    Various courses in literature and related fields are offered experimentally, once or twice, under this heading. Topics are announced each semester during pre-registration. Recent topics have included Gothic Literature, The Harlem Renaissance, and memory and World War II.   More Info

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  • ENGL 380  Special Topics in English and American Literature II

    Description:
    Various courses in literature and related fields are offered experimentally, once or twice, under this heading. Topics are announced each semester during pre-registration. Recent topics have included Gothic Literature, The Harlem Renaissance, and memory and World War II.   More Info

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  • ENGL 381  Geoffrey Chaucer

    Description:
    A study of the Canterbury Tales and, time permitting, some of Chaucer''s other works in the original Middle English. No prior knowledge of Chaucer, the period (the later fourteenth century), or Middle English is required. Taped readings aid in learning the language. Discussion emphasizes how the works reflect the medieval period and how Chaucer draws readers of all periods into intellectual and moral pilgrimages of their own.   More Info

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  • ENGL 382  William Shakespeare's Early Works

    Description:
    Shakespeare''s comedies, history plays, and early tragedies largely from the first half of Shakespeare''s career. The course emphasizes critical interpretations of individual plays but it attempts as well to review Shakespeare''s dramatic art in general, theater history and conventions, theory of comedy and theory of tragedy, the language of verse drama, and the development of the history play.   More Info

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  • ENGL 383  William Shakespeare's Later Works

    Description:
    Shakespeare''s problem plays, major tragedies and late romances. The course emphasizes critical interpretations of individual plays, and it assumes that students will have had some experience of Shakespearean plays, such as those in ENGL 382. But this course may be elected without such experience.   More Info

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  • ENGL 385  John Milton

    Description:
    Reading and discussion of John Milton''s English poetry and some of his prose: early lyrics; the tragedy Samson Agonistes; the epics Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained. Attention to modern debates about structure and style and to the relation between Milton''s politics and his poetry.   More Info

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  • ENGL 386  Virginia Woolf

    Description:
    A study of Virginia Woolfs novels, essays, and memoirs with special attention given to such topics as the development of her thought on identity, character, and literary form; her role as an early feminist; and her life as a writer. In exploring Woolfs writings, the course will introduce students to the social, political, and literary worlds of early twentieth-century London.   More Info

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  • ENGL 387  Charles Dickens

    Description:
    A study of Charles Dickens' novels and the wonderful fictive world he created; his life and times; the tradition he shared in and changed. Emphasis on five novels, such as Emphasis on five novels, such The Old Curiosity Shop, Oliver Twist, Martin Chuzzlewit, Dombey and Son, and Our Mutual Friend.   More Info

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  • ENGL 391  James Joyce

    Description:
    A study of the cyclical nature of the works of James Joyce: Dubliners, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, and parts of Finnegan''s Wake. Emphasis, however, is on the close critical reading of Ulysses.   More Info

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  • ENGL 394  Transnational Reading of Two Authors

    Description:
    This course offers a comparative study of two authors whose works reach across national boundaries to reveal social and thematic affinities or interesting problems of contrast. Unlike English 395, which compares writers from the same national tradition, this version of the course offers transnational credit. This transnational comparison places English literature in a global context, allowing issues of place and space, origin and tradition, and local, national, and global influence to be investigated. The authors studied vary from year to year. Examples of possible pairings are Richardson and Franklin, Melville and Dickens, Munro and Lahiri, or Soyinka and Morrison.   More Info

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  • ENGL 395  Comparative Reading of Two Authors

    Description:
    This course offers a comparative study of two British or two American writers who worked within a shared national tradition, and whose writings reveal social and thematic affinities or present interesting problems of contrast. Students in the course engage in the meaningful juxtaposition of the two authors, exploring how such comparisons can lead to a more complex understanding of each. Unlike English 394, which compares writers from different nations, this version of the course does not offer transnational credit. The authors studied vary from year to year. Examples of possible paired writers include Shakespeare and Jonson, Burney and Austen, Hawthorne and Melville, Dickens and Gaskell, or Wharton and Morrison.   More Info

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  • ENGL 396  Jane Austen

    Description:
    This course examines Jane Austen's major works with regard to content and context. In trying to understand the enduring popularity of Austens major novels, we will discuss questions of adaptation and nostalgia, style and social class. In reading Austens major novels, students will be encourages to understand philosophical issues (most notably aesthetics and the theory of the mind), and historical aspects of Regency period culture (the marriage market, inheritance practices, Britains view of France, the slave trade, and novel reading). Attention will also be paid to other important female writers of her time in the attempt to understand Austens posthumous elevation to literary stardom.   More Info

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  • ENGL 401  The Medieval Period

    Description:
    Lyrics, romances, mystery plays, allegories of English literature in the period before the sixteenth century. Old and Middle English writers, including Chaucer, Langland, and the Pearl Poet; stories of King Arthur and his knights.   More Info

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  • ENGL 402  The Renaissance in England

    Description:
    Major work of the English Renaissance (early sixteenth through early seventeenth centuries), in poetry and prose. Authors such as Thomas More, Christopher Marlowe, Edmund Spenser, Shakespeare, Ben Jonson, John Donne, and Milton. Reading in Renaissance criticism.   More Info

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  • ENGL 403  The 18th Century: Satire to Sensibility

    Description:
    The art and ideas, in poetry and prose, of such writers as John Dryden, Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, the early novelists Defoe and Fielding, Samuel Johnson, and Edmund Burke. A study of the chief social and philosophical currents of the period 1660 (the Restoration) to the later eighteenth century.   More Info

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  • ENGL 405  British Romanticism

    Description:
    A study of literature as a reflection of social and cultural change occurring in the revolutionary age (1780s to 1830s ). Attention to how notions of nature, genius, and the imagination created political changes and altered conceptions of how history was understood. Works by authors such as Wordsworth, Coleridge, Blake, Godwin, Hays, Wollstonecraft, Scott, Byron, Austen, PB Shelley, M Shelley, and Keats.   More Info

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  • ENGL 406  The Victorian Age

    Description:
    A study of social, technological, spiritual, and cultural changes in Victorian England (1830s to 1880s) as reflected in tensions-between community and individualism, tradition and progress, belief and doubt, utility and feeling-in works by such writers as Carlyle, Mill, Browning, Barrett Browning, Macaulay, Dickens, Tennyson, Arnold, Ruskin, and Pater. Consideration is given to music and visual arts.   More Info

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  • ENGL 407  Colonial American Literature

    Description:
    Study of the important literary texts of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries crucial for an understanding of later American culture and literature. Works in poetry and prose, fiction and non-fiction by authors such as Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin, Wheatley, Equaiano Oloudah, Crevecoeur, Jefferson, Freneau, and Charles Brockden Brown.   More Info

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  • ENGL 408  American Romanticism

    Description:
    A study of literature as a reflection of social and cultural changes occurring from the 1830s through the 1860s. Attention to both the most famous traditional "romantics" (Poe, Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman) and to the important "minority" writers whose works, published in the same period, helped to change the tradition (Fuller, Douglass, Truth, Stowe, Jacobs, and others).   More Info

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  • ENGL 409  American Realism

    Description:
    A study of the tradition of realism in American writing, from the age of Whitman to 1925. Primary focus on the post-Civil War period, the Gilded Age, when realistic and naturalistic works replaced the romance as the dominant American mode of literary expression. Whitman, Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Chesnutt, Dreiser, Jewett, Wharton, and others sought to reflect a transformed America, as fact and symbol, in their works. These and other writers helped to confirm and create a new American reality.   More Info

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  • ENGL 410  The Modern Period

    Description:
    A study of the phenomenon of "modernism" in, roughly, the first half of the twentieth century in Britain and America. Reading and discussion of such writers as Yeats, Joyce, Lawrence, Woolf, Eliot, Hemingway, Pound, and Faulkner.   More Info

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  • ENGL 411  Postcolonial Literary Studies

    Description:
    This course introduces student to the diversity of literary, philosophic, and political topics addressed by postcolonialism. Drawing on a wide range of texts, we will pursue the following avenues of inquiry: What do we mean by the term Empire? How has the reach of Empire been historically constructed, critiqued in fiction, and/or sustained through narrative: What forms of identity are available to individuals who have been displaced, either through personal choice or random (and often tragic) circumstance? And, finally, how post is postcolonialism? To answer these and related questions, this course will further explore the different experiences of colonization, decolonization, and postcolonial culture and politics during the twentieth century in South Africa, Nigeria, Jamaica, India, Australia, and Northern Ireland. Taking a transdisciplinary approach, we will conduct inquiries into the nature of sociopolitical and cultural conditions that characterize current or former colonies, the diverse registers in which these conditions are discursively articulated, and the modes, spaces, and politics of their (re)production, circulation, and consumption. Some themes this course will address include the psychology of colonization and settlement; violence and decolonization; constructions of the Other by imperial center; hybrid cultural formations wrought by the impacts between colonizer and colonized. Taking the above statement by Ghosh as instructive, this course will also seek to interrogate the idea that culture is a coherent or self-contained whole; thus, the final portion of this class will address themes of travel, immigration, and concepts of the diaspora, homeland, and exile by attending to the new cosmopolitanism.   More Info

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  • ENGL 412  Contemporary British Fiction and Film

    Description:
    This course will take a wide-ranging view of contemporary British fiction and film by reading novels and watching films about Great Britain (i.e., England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland) produced between 1980 and the present moment. We will study the dynamic internationalism of English writing and filmmaking; we will investigate the highly politicized regionalism apparent in novels and films from Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. Finally, we will contextualize our in-class discussions of the novels and films with select essays about contemporary politics in Great Britain and, more broadly, contemporary theories about film and narrative theory.   More Info

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  • ENGL 415  Irish Literature

    Description:
    A close study of Yeats, Synge, O'Casey, Joyce and other writers of the modern Irish renaissance. The backgrounds of Irish history and literature relative to the above writers are also studied.   More Info

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  • ENGL 417  The Irish Short Story

    Description:
    After an introductory consideration of the oral tradition of Irish storytelling, this course traces the thematic concerns and technical developments of the Irish short story from 1830 to the present. It focuses especially on the most noted twentieth century practitioners of the short story in Ireland-O''Connor, O''Faolain, and O''Flaherty-but also gives close consideration to their precursors, their contemporaries, and their followers.   More Info

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  • ENGL 418  The Modern Irish Novel

    Description:
    This course explores the interests and concerns of the modern Irish novel. Focusing on a variety of representative authors and texts, the course traces the thematic and technical developments of the Irish novel over the decades of the twentieth century. Novels are read with reference to their political, social, and cultural contexts.   More Info

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  • ENGL 419  Recent Irish Writing

    Description:
    A study of Irish literature after the age of Yeats and Joyce, the course examines invention, adaptation, and development, in the major genres, of Irish writing during decades of economic depression, cultural isolation, war, and renewed sectional and international tensions. Emphasis is given to the re-emergence of Irish writings, particularly in the achievements of the Ulster poets, in our own day. "If you would know Ireland," advised Yeats, "body and soul-you must read its poems and stories."   More Info

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  • ENGL 430  Literature of the Atlantic

    Description:
    A study of writings produced in and about the Atlantic world during the successive eras of exploration, colonization, commercialization, revolution, and nation-formation. The course begins by comparing English imaginings of the mysterious lands to the west with the realities of conquest in the New World. It continues by considering such prominent parts of eighteenth-century Atlantic life, such as international commerce, the slave trade, and the African diaspora, as well as charting connections between the development of English and American senses of "nation."   More Info

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  • ENGL 431  Transatlantic Romanticism

    Description:
    This course covers literature and literary culture from the 1880s to the 1830s in Britain and from the 1840s to the 1860s in the Americas. Its aim is to recreate the many complex conversations and debates in which authors from various nations participated, many of which still speak to us today. The course examines well-known writers and texts by writers better known in their time than today (or known mostly within their own circle) as they engage the debates arising within and between Atlantic-rim nations.   More Info

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  • ENGL 437  Reading the Gothic: Transatlantic Terrors

    Description:
    This course explores how Gothic stories were invented and developed by the transatlantic imagination in the mid 18th century, and surveys their subsequent development through the 20th century. We will address such questions as why readers would be attracted to obviously unreal stories and how these stories test the imaginations ability to make extreme fictions feel real. We will trace the influence of Gothic on other areas of the literary arts, on other artistic fields such as architecture and painting, and even on social developments such as how women were viewed and how other foreign cultures were interpreted. Authors may include Walpole, Brockden Brown, Shelley, Irving, Hawthorne, Poe, Dickens, Stoker, Oates, King.   More Info

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  • ENGL 438  Reading the Graphic: Texts and Images

    Description:
    Some scholars argue that our culture has become increasingly visual in recent years, and many worry that our ability to understand the complex power of images sometimes lags behind our ability to analyze and use words. This course aims to refine our ability to talk about visual representation, analyzing not only how words and images work together in what we read and see, but also how they collude in photographic essays, graphic novels, and illustrated stories. Classic examples of these genres will be surveyed in the effort to investigate the fascinating relationships between images and words, as well as the roles this relationship plays in our language and our ways of thinking about truth, story-telling, memory, identity, and power.   More Info

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  • ENGL 440  History of the English Language

    Description:
    Where did English come from? How have historical events influenced change in the language? Should change today be resisted or accepted? Who or what determines what is "correct"? Participants learn how to analyze and transcribe speech sounds, use traditional grammar to understand grammatical change, and work with specialized dictionaries that help in analyzing short texts from various periods of English.   More Info

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  • ENGL 442  Contemporary English

    Description:
    A look at the structure and the social dynamics at work in the English language today, chiefly in America. Topics: competing grammars, speech in Massachusetts, effects of social stratification on language, regional and social dialect, language and gender, language and ethnicity, and changes in meaning.   More Info

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  • ENGL 443  Language and Literature

    Description:
    An exploration of literary meaning and the character of language as a symbolic form. Special emphasis on the structure of metaphor and consideration of psychological and philosophical aspects of language: basic conceptions of meaning; theories of the origin of speech; problems of intention, expression, and interpretation; background of modern theories of grammar, semantics, and semiotics.   More Info

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  • ENGL 446  Poetry and Poetics

    Description:
    Reading of several groups of poems, old and recent, in order to learn as much as possible about what poetry is and does. The readings illustrate, successively: 1) the nature of poetry; 2) prosody; 3) verse forms; 4) the language of verse. The course assumes no prior knowledge of poetics.   More Info

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  • ENGL 448  Perspectives on Literacy

    Description:
    A study of the theories of literacy, in its relation to human thinking and to social uses and contexts; and of the practice of literacy, in the teaching, learning, and use of literate behaviors in contemporary American society. The course links the active investigation of literacy issues with related readings, and draws implications for the teaching of reading and writing and for the study of literature.   More Info

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  • ENGL 449  Contemporary Issues in the Teaching of English

    Description:
    The desire to teach English or Language Arts raises fundamental questions about the meaning of the discipline: How can the relationships between reading, writing, and the understanding of literature be explored in the classroom? What is suitable subject matter for students at various grade levels? What exactly is English studies? Engaging with these questions, this course surveys contemporary debates and research on teaching English skills and literature. Includes discussion of the specific challenges of teaching English today: for example, how teachers can engage a diverse population of students, and adapt to todays internet-driven age.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 455  Independent Study I

    Description:
    A course of study designed by the student in conjunction with a supervising instructor in a specialized subject, one ordinarily not available in the standard course offerings. Open to a limited number of students in any one semester. Preference may be given to senior English majors with a cumulative average of 3.0 or above. A written prospectus must be submitted. Register with director of the major.   More Info

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  • ENGL 456  Independent Study II

    Description:
    A course of study designed by the student in conjunction with a supervising instructor in a specialized subject, one ordinarily not available in the standard course offerings. Open to a limited number of students in any one semester. Preference may be given to senior English majors with a cumulative average of 3.0 or above. A written prospectus must be submitted. Register with director of the major.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 457  Undergraduate English Colloquium

    Description:
    Presents students with a series of guest lectures, film and dramatic presentations, field trips, workshops, and organized discussions. To receive a grade, students must attend at least eight events and write critical reviews for each event attended. Each semester two to three faculty members will organize and run the series, and evaluate student reviews.   More Info

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  • ENGL 459  Seminar for Tutors

    Description:
    Readings, writings and discussion on the theoretical and practical issues one encounters in working as a composition tutor. A nucleus of presentations, lectures, workshops and readings covering the transactional and substantive aspects of teaching writing, particularly remediation, from a peer position. All elements of the course combine to provide an intellectual framework for reflection, articulation, and synthesis of what is learned in the work experience of the tutor.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 461  Advanced Studies in Drama

    Description:
    A capstone course offering intensive study of topics varying from semester to semester, such as particular forms of drama (e.g., tragedy), historic periods or movements (e.g., African American or British Restoration drama), or comparative studies of two or three dramatists. A major research project and its presentation in class are required.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 462  Advanced Studies in Poetry

    Description:
    Studies in various trends and periods of poetry for advanced students; intensive studies in one or two major poets. Topics vary from year to year.   More Info

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  • ENGL 463  Advanced Studies in Prose

    Description:
    A capstone course offering advanced study of topics that vary from semester to semester, such as particular kinds of fiction or nonfiction (e.g., the historical novel or literary journalism), theory or history of rhetoric, theory of fiction or literary nonfiction, or comparative studies of two or three prose writers. A major research project and its presentation to the class are required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 464  Advanced Studies in Language and Literary Theory

    Description:
    This course offers students interested in language or literary theory an opportunity to do advanced work in subjects which vary from semester to semester. Possible subjects include: theories of discourse, varieties of present day English, the linguistic structures of poetry, and advanced stylistics.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 465  Advanced Studies in Literature and Society

    Description:
    This capstone course offers advanced study in topics that focus on the relationship between literature and society; these topics vary from semester to semester. Possible subjects include the exploration of literatures representation of social structures such as class, periods defined by specific social events such as war, social institutions such as work or home, or cultural understandings of social behavior and beliefs. A major research project and its presentation to the class are required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 466  Advanced Special Topics

    Description:
    A capstone course offering intensive study of a topic at the intersection of different approaches to or disciplinary perspectives on literature. Topics may include relationships between literature and (1) other arts; (2) cultural, social, or economic history; or (3) the development of fields such as law, medicine, or science. A major research project and its presentation are required.   More Info

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  • ENGL 470L  New England Literature and Culture

    Description:
    A study of the New England literary tradition from about 1850 to the near present. How have writers and critics contested their differing versions of native grounds and reinvented the New England idea in their works? Consideration of such topics as Native American culture, Puritanism and Transcendentalism, slavery and Abolitionism, immigration and ethnicity, nationalism and regionalism, industrialization, and popular culture. AMST 470L and ENGL 470L are the same course.   More Info

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  • ENGL 471L  The City in American Literature and Culture

    Description:
    A study of physical, social, and cultural aspects of the American city, as reflected and constructed in architecture, the arts (literature, film, music, visual arts), and theory. The course focuses on four historical periods: the mid-19th century, the turn of thecentury, the mid-20th century, and the present; and includes a capstone research project. AMST 471L and ENGL 471L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 475  English Internship

    Description:
    A tutorial course for students with approved internships involving substantial writing in professional settings. Students meet every other week with a faculty internship director to discuss writing they have produced at the internship. The writing is accompanied by a breakdown of the steps involved in researching and composing it, the time spent, the extent of the intern's contribution, and an analysis of what was learned in the process. Course requirements typically include a journal, readings, and end-of-term portfolio, and a summary essay, and may include an oral presentation to a class or student group. For application forms and full information about requirements, see the director of internships. Because potential faculty internship directors make commitments early, students are encouraged to apply during advanced registration. The course awards three hours of credit for a minimum of 25 pages of formal on-the-job writing and ten hours of work per week on site. Six credit hours may be given for proportionally greater writing and on-site hours. The course satisfies the English major capstone requirement.   More Info

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  • ENGL 476  Technical Writing Internship

    Description:
    A seminar for students assigned to internships for the completion of their work in the Program in Technical Writing (Computer Science). It deals with issues interns face as they adapt writing and computer training to actual technical writing assignments. Speakers from the faculty and from the technical writing profession will attend. There are assigned readings and regular reports on progress in the internship. The seminar meets for two hours every other week, and the internship placement requires at least ten hours per week in a technical writing concern. Three hours of credit (pass-fail) is awarded for the combination seminar and placement.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 477  English Internship II

    Description:
    A tutorial course for students with approved internships involving substantial writing in professional settings. Students meet every other week with a faculty internship director to discuss writing they have produced a the internship. The writing is accompanied by a breakdown of the steps involved in researching and composing it, the time spent, the extent of the interns contribution, and an analysis of what was learned in the process. Course requirements typically include a journal, readings, and end-of-term portfolio, and a summary essay, and may include an oral presentation to a class or student group. For application forms and full information about requirements, see the director of internships. Because potential faculty internship directors make commitments early, students are encouraged to apply during advanced registration. The course awards three hours of credit of a minimum of 25 pages of formal on-the-job writing and ten hours of work per week on site.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • ENGL 480  The History of the Book

    Description:
    Opening Bostons rich archival resources to students, this capstone course gives undergraduates the opportunity to work with old, new, hyper, and rare texts. The course offers new perspectives on the book, exploring the book both as a manuscript and visual object and as a printed and edited object. It considers industries of the book, such as publishing and the internet, as well as its cultural effects, such as literacy and the circulation of ideas. In addition to readings in poetry, prose, literary theory, and history, the course is structured by hands-on workshops, library visits, and a self-defined research paper.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 483  Origins of U.S. Literature: Declaring Independence

    Description:
    A survey of U.S. literature of the early national period (1776-1865) in light of enduring American ideals of rebellion, mobility, and flight. Readings and assignments will illuminate the problems of articulating an American national character out of the paradoxes of slavery and freedom, the simultaneous development of anti-institutional and imperialist impulses, and the convergence of individual and communal pursuits of happiness.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 484  Nineteenth-Century Literature and Material Culture

    Description:
    This course examines literature produced during the period of transition and change in great Britain between the end of the Enlightenment and the beginning of the Victorian Age, studying both the culture of the times and the literature that expresses its dreams and failures. Writers such as Burney, Lamb, Austen, Hazlitt, and DeQuincey will be seen alongside the material culture that provided their imaginative ground, such as fashion, food, exhibitions and games, monthlies and the press. The course makes the culture of this increasingly industrialized era more tangibly available in order to understand its importance for the periods literary art.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 488  Literatures of the Middle East

    Description:
    With its diversity of cultures and ethnicities, interwoven political histories, and multiplicity of faiths across twenty nations, the Middle East demands a nuanced examination of its literary productions. The course engages a selection of literary and cinematic texts from several nations, including Egypt, Iran, Israel, Lebanon, Morocco, and Palestine. Authors and filmmakers studied hold varying faiths (Christianity, Islam, and Judaism) and political opinions. Themes treated include identity, nationalism, religiosity, gender, feminisms, memory, conflict, and home. Because many course texts will be studied in translation, the course also considers what it means to learn about places and peoples through translations.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 489  Terrorism and the Novel

    Description:
    Our primary aim in this course is to examine the diversity of ways in which terrorism has been represented in narrative fiction. Topics include: Victorian anarchism, the Troubles in Northern Ireland, international responses to 9/11, the collisions between postmodernism and terrorism. This course requires extensive reading in political, historical, and theoretical materials. We will use these materials to pose more general literary questions: How have modern writers engaged questions of political violence? What forms of communication does terrorism authorize and foreclose?   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 490  The Pre-modern and Postmodern Novel

    Description:
    This course connects the postmodern novel being written today to the novel as it was first invented in the eighteenth century. Breaking the illusion of reality, the postmodern novel self-consciously calls attention to its artificial, constructed nature. The eighteenth-century novel has not yet decided that realism is its goal and thus has great fun exploring the limits of character, plot narrator, and setting. This course compares these novel explorations, exploring how they reject the linear or chronological plot, the distinctions between author and character, and the typographical structure of the book page itself. The course includes readings in narrative theory and literary history.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • ENGL 496  Creative Writing Honors Seminar

    Description:
    A creative writing workshop for student writers of poetry, fiction, or drama who have been accepted into the Honors Program in English and Creative Writing. A one-semester course (in the fall), to be followed by one semester of independent work with an advisor.   More Info

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  • ENGL 497  Creative Writing Honors Thesis

    Description:
    Independent study in creative writing for student writers of poetry, fiction, or drama who have been accepted into the Honors Program in English and Creative Writing and who have completed English 496 with a grade of B or better.   More Info

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  • ENGL 498  English Honors Seminar

    Description:
    A course open to and required to all students doing honors work in English. The course consists of an introduction to research methods, a survey of critical methods (with the end of helping the honors student choose an approach for the writing of the thesis), and the reading of all primary and some secondary materials preparatory to writing the thesis.   More Info

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  • ENGL 499  English Honors Thesis

    Description:
    A continuation of ENGL 498, in which the honors student works individually with a faculty advisor on the writing of the honors thesis. The student receives a grade for each semester of work but honors in English will be awarded only to those students who have written a thesis of high distinction (as judged by the Honors Committee).   More Info

    Offered in: