Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > HIST

History

  • HIST 101  Introduction to Historical Thinking and Analysis

    Description:
    This course is designed to introduce students to the discipline of history, to the way in which primary sources are used to assemble historical narratives and explanations. The course introduces the student to the basic skills of historical thought and analysis, how to read and understand sources, to weigh evidence, evaluate it and place it in a larger context, and to explain why and how past events happened. Each section of the class will be focused upon a particular person, event or theme that will allow students to examine primary and secondary sources and to use the former to evaluate the latter as a means to developing the skills appropriate to a beginning student of history.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 115L  Survey of Contemporary Asia

    Description:
    This broad survey course provides a basic familiarity with some of the major political, social and cultural issues in modern Asia from the mid-nineteen century tot he present. We will deal specifically with China, Japan, Vietnam, India, Pakistan and Bangladesh. The major themes include: social inequality, religious and ethnic diversity, political conflict and economic change (South Asia): colonialism and war (South East Asia): military nationalism, revolution, alternative paths to modernity and economic development (East Asia). Asian Studies 115 is the gateway course for all students wishing to major in Asian Studies at UMass Boston. ASIAN 115L and HIST 115L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 160L  East Asian Civilizations to 1850

    Description:
    An introduction to the traditional civilizations of China, Japan, and to a lesser extent Korea, from the earliest times to the arrival of the modern industrial West in the mid-nineteenth century. (Course offered in the fall only.) ASIAN 160L and HIST 160L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 161L  East Asian Civilizations since 1850

    Description:
    An introduction to the modern transformation of China, Japan, and, to a lesser extent, Korea, from their encounter with the industrial West in the mid-nineteenth century up to the present day. (Course offered in the spring only.) ASIAN 161L and HIST 161L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 171  Leeches to Lasers: Medicine and Health in the United States

    Description:
    "Leeches to Lasers: Medicine and Health in the United States" examines the rise of institutional and professional structures in response to health needs and disease, as well as cultural responses to epidemics, illness, and changing norms of well-being in American history. This course is designed for science majors and those who intend to enter the health professions as well as for history majors.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 175  Comic Books in America: The History of Comic Books and American Society since 1938

    Description:
    In 1938 a man in a colorful costume appeared on the cover of Action Comics #1, a comic aimed at eight year old boys. Superman went on to become one of the most internationally recognized figures in the world. Since then there have been crime comics, romance comics, science fiction comics, and many other genres; in the 21st century "Graphic Novels" appear on the best seller lists and are reviewed in the nation's leading newspapers. This course will examine the history of comic books, and how they have both reflected and influenced American society across more than seven decades.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 178  Special Topics in History

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 190G  Witchcraft in European History

    Description:
    Witches and witchcraft are phenomena found throughout history and throughout the world. This intensive first year seminar revolves around the various ways the idea of witches, people who identified themselves or were identified as witches, and their practices interacted with European society at large and helped shape society, religion, law and culture from about 700 CE until 1700 CE.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 201  Monarchs-People-Hist

    Description:
    The origins and reasons for monarchy as an institution and social force in the Western world. Specific royal personages are studied with attention to how they attained or lost effectiveness as leasers; their goals for themselves and their people are stressed. These themes are explored through primary source readings. Architectural, artistic, and musical evidence are introduced in slide and tape sessions.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 203G  Leaders in History

    Description:
    This course studies six great world leaders, in order to understand political power and the role of the individual in influencing the course of history. Each example studied serves as an introduction to historical problems and periods, from ancient to modern. In the process, key concepts for understanding history are introduced and discussed. This course may count toward the major or minor in history. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for HIST C202 (The Individual in History), but not for both. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, oral presentation.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 211  Foundations of Western Civilization

    Description:
    A survey of European history from the golden age of Greece in the 5th century BCE to 1715, laying particular stress on politics, culture and religion. Major topics examined will include the culture of ancient Greece; the rise of Rome and the ideology of the Roman Empire; the early development of Christianity and its impact on the ancient world; the evolution of new political forms in the Middle Ages; medieval Christianity; the impact of Renaissance efforts to revive Greek and Roman civilization; the Protestant Reformation and Catholic responses to it; and the scientific and intellectual culture of the seventeenth century. In addition to broad coverage the course will devote attention to critical examination of a selection of key historical texts.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 212  Modern Western Civilization

    Description:
    This course traces the history of Western Civilization from the enlightenment of the 18th century up to the transformations that took place in the 1990s. It is a history of revolutions and wars, ideologies and institutions. It is also a history of people, the lives they led and the decisions they made. In this period Western European nations, and a former colony, the United States, became the dominant powers in the world. During the last three centuries, Western Civilization has influenced the lives of all people whether they lived in the west or in other parts of the world. By studying western civilization we therefore come to understand a great deal about our present day world and the lives we lead.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 213  World History to 1800

    Description:
    This course considers the ways that disparate parts of the world were interconnected and interdependent before the modern era. Through studies of the growth of civilizations across the continents, the rise of world religions, the development and later transformations of the silk roads, and the early modern colonial projects of Europe, student swill have opportunities to consider how religion, language, empire, and trade created common spaces for peoples from diverse regions of the world. Topics range from early urbanization in Egypt and Mexico, to the Islamic empire, the Asian world system. Europes shift from periphery to core, the civilizations of the Americas, and the rise of the African slave trade in the trans-Atlantic context.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 214  Modern World History

    Description:
    This course offers an examination for the processes of modernization and globalization since the late eighteenth century; their connections to imperialism, colonialism, and war; and their relationships to changing perceptions of society, politics, economics, gender, and culture in different regions of the world.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 220  History of European Imperialism

    Description:
    This course introduces students to the history of European imperialism from the late eighteenth century to the present day. It will consider the political, economic and cultural dimensions of imperialism, focusing in particular on the different experiences of empire from the perspective of both those who ruled and those who lived under colonial rule. Required readings will draw on recent historical scholarship and a range of primary sources including maps, photographs, films, and novels spanning the Caribbean, North and West Africa, the Middle East, and South and Southeast Asia.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 224G  Revolutionaries

    Description:
    In the centuries since it exploded on the scene, capitalism has continued to remake the world. This course examines the capitalist revolution and the revolutions that followed-the French, the Russian, and others-as seen "from the bottom up," through the eyes of artisans, peasants, and wage workers. This course may count toward the major or minor in history. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for HIST C223 (Revolutions in Modern History), but not for both. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 230L  Ancient Egypt

    Description:
    A survey of the history, art, archaeology, and religion of ancient Egypt. CLSICS 230L and HIST 230L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 248  Early Islamic History

    Description:
    This course explores the history of Islamic civilizaiton from its foundation in the seventh century to the establishment of the Ottoman Empire in the fourteenth century. After examining the consolidation of the Arabian peninsula under the Prophet Muhammad and the early Caliphs, we will turn our attention to the Umayyad and Abbasid states. The course will conclude with a discussion of the Mongol invasion of the Middle East/West Asia in 1258 and its aftermath. Topics to be covered include early Islamic political philosophy, the emergence and development of Islamic law, the posistion of minority groups within various early Islamic states, early Islamic approaches to gender and sexuality, and how this formative period of Islamic history is remembered both inside and outsice of the Middle East/West Asia today.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 249  Modern Middle East History

    Description:
    This course begins where History 248 ends, with an exploration of the early Ottoman Empire as a European and Middle Eastern/West Asian state. It then turns to the transformation of this state in the context of European imperialism. Finally, it examines the construction of post-Ottoman borders, mandates, and nation states. The first half of the term will focus on the period between 1299 and the First World War. The second half will be devoted to twentieth and twenty-first century case studies. Although our framework of inquiry will be political and legal history boradly conceived, we will read a variety of sources-including religious texts, philosophy, literature, and travelogues-to help us understand the modern history of the region.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 251  South Asia and the India Ocean World: Trade, Labor and Capital from 1800 to the Present

    Description:
    The Indian Ocean region includes Southern and Eastern Africa, the Persian Gulf, South Asia, and parts of South East Asia. This course will study the influence of South Asia int he creation of systems of state, and the circulation of goods, labor and capital through his region over two hundred years.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 252  Africa before 1900

    Description:
    This course examines the history of Africa prior to 1900. The course emphasizes such themes as Islam in Africa, trade and politics in medieval Africa, slavery and the slave trade, the creation of European colonization, and early resistance to that colonization.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 253  History of Modern Africa

    Description:
    This course focuses on major themes in the history of Africa since 1900. These include the establishment of colonial rule and colonial administrative practices, colonial economies, African nationalism and decolonization, South Africa and the politics of apartheid, and post-colonial Africa from a global perspective.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 255L  Latin America before 1800

    Description:
    The imposition of Spanish and Portuguese institutions on the pre-Columbian civilizations in the new world, and the economic, social religious, political, and cultural institutions that developed in Latin America. Emphasis on the differences and similarities between colonial Latin America and other contemporary and later empires. HIST 255L and LATAM 255L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 256L  Latin America since 1800

    Description:
    The histories of Mexico, Argentina, Brazil and Cuba since 1800. Emphasis on British and American economic expansion into these countries during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the resulting political and social consequences. HIST 256L and LATAM 256L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 262  American Indian History to 1783

    Description:
    Once relegated to the margins of U.S. history, American Indian histories have emerged as important narratives in their own right and central components to the stories we tell about our own states, regions, and nation. For generations, American Indians have pushed their own priorities and been crucial historical actors in the making of the United States long before this nation came into existence. As part one of a yearlong survey of American Indian history, this course examines the histories of indigenous peoples of North America from their perspective, including the peopling of the Americas; pre-Columbian societies and civilizations; first contact encounters and exchanges with non-Natives; strategies American Indians used to confront expanding European and indigenous powers; and ways indigenous North Americans engaged global markets, diplomacy, and competing empires.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 265  American History before 1877

    Description:
    Beginning with the history of North America prior to the voyages of Columbus, History 265 examines the impact of Europeans upon indigenous peoples, and studies the evolution of colonial settlements in British North America. It covers the causes and consequences of the American Revolution, the subsequent development of democratic political and social institutions, the emergence of transportation, market and industrial revolutions and the coming of the sectional conflict and Civil War.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 266  American History since 1877

    Description:
    History 266 begins in the aftermath of the Civil War and Reconstruction and examines the nature and impact of urbanization, immigration, and industrialization. The course then examines the growth of American imperialism and the nation's rise to world power status. It also focuses on cycles of economic change, including the Great Depression and the enormous expansion of the middle class after World War II. The course will also examine the Cold War in both its worldwide impact, such as wars in Korea and Vietnam, and on the domestic front. Finally, the course examines the transformation of society and culture in the second half of the Twentieth Century.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 276  This Land is Your Land: A Survey of American Environmental History

    Description:
    From the Dust Bowl to current global climate change, from Hoover Dam to acid rain, from the 1927 Mississippi flood to Hurricane Katrina, from Native American agriculture to the recent Farm Bill, this class studies how people have used and changed the North American environment from the colonial era to the present. Through discussion exams, and essays, students will master historical material and build skills in document analysis and written argument. This class does not require a background in history. Science majors and first-year students welcome.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 280  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 290G  Globalization in Historical Perspective

    Description:
    The development of the world economy since 1750 and its relationship to other global phenomena: industrialization, social and cultural modernization, imperialism, and the worldwide adoption of the political model of the nation-state. The course provides a foundation in history for the discussion of contemporary issues. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing, academic self-assessment, collaborative learning, information technology, oral presentation.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 301L  Ancient Greek History

    Description:
    This course provides a survey of the origin, rise and development of ancient Greek civilization from the arrival of the Greeks in Europe until the death of Cleopatra (approximately 1600-30 BC). Emphasis is placed on the rise of the Greek city-state and the spread of Greek culture to the East. CLSICS 301L and HIST 301L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 302L  Roman History

    Description:
    This course focuses on the Roman state from its origins until the triumph of Christianity from about 700 BC to 300 AD. Republic and Empire receive equal attention. CLSICS 302L and HIST 302L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 303L  The Archaeology of Ancient Greece

    Description:
    This course provides a survey of Greek archaeology and history from the Bronze Age through the Classical Era. Students are introduced to the methods and aims of archaeology. The course begins with the Minoan and Mycenaean eras; the Dark Age and emergency of the full Hellenic era are treated, with emphasis on the city-states of the Greeks. The course makes extensive use of images and surveys the art and architecture of the Greeks in the context of primary literary sources. CLSICS 303L and HIST 303L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 304  Early Middle Ages: Europe 300-1000

    Description:
    The Early Middle Ages covers the period when the great Western monarchies and the social structures and economy that supported them began and the enormous influence of Imperial Rome persisted. Additionally, interaction with a series of invaders as well as relations with the rapidly expanding Islamic states helped to shape Europe geographically, culturally and linguistically. History 304 examines these developments with close analysis of original documents and historiographical analysis.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 305  Later Middle Ages: Europe 1000-1450

    Description:
    The Later Middle Ages examines the story of a backward part of the world. By the year 1000, Europe was a collection of fractious and fragile governments, a scattered population, few towns (with mostly barter economies) and frequent wars. Poor cousins to the magnificent civilizations of Asia and Africa, nevertheless Europeans, in the space of a few hundred years, forged a civilization that more than any other has been able to impose its culture on the rest of the planet. History 305 seeks to explain this by close analysis of original document sand historiographical analysis.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 306L  The Archaeology of Ancient Rome

    Description:
    This course provides a methodological approach to roman archaeology as a key to understanding the history and culture of Rome and its empire from the city's origins in about 750 BC through the height and decline of Roman civilization during the first through fourth centuries AD. The course makes extensive use of images and surveys the art and architecture of the Romans in the context of primary literary sources. CLSICS 306L and HIST 306L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 307  Renaissance&Reformation

    Description:
    People, ideas, and institutions of fourteenth century through sixteenth century Europe.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 308  The History of Common Law

    Description:
    The principles underlying the evolution of law in Western Europe. Emphasis on England during the Middle Ages. Some of the legal concepts and procedures necessary in understanding medieval history and common law. Recommended for pre-law students. (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 309  The Mediaeval Mind

    Description:
    Through literary, philosophical, and religious masterpieces from the period, this interdisciplinary seminar probes the culture which created the modern West and considers the differences between its modes of thought and moral values and ours.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 311  Europe in the Age of the Enlightenment

    Description:
    The main currents of eighteenth century European thought in their historical setting. Attention to social and political factors in cultural development. Topics include the Scientific Revolution and the rise of secularism, the shift from corporative to class society, enlightened despotism, popular culture and the democratization of knowledge, war and the struggle for empire.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 312  Cities in Early Modern Europe

    Description:
    This course offers a survey of urban life in Europe between 1400 and 1750. The course begins by examining how mercantile culture, religious and ritual life, and political and artistic patronage shaped the urban experience in Florence and Venice. It then proceeds north of the Alps and explores the ways in which German, English, and French urban live influenced and intersected with the development of Protestantism, the wars of religion, the English civil war, and the emergence of absolutism.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 313  Nineteenth Century Europe

    Description:
    A political, social and cultural history of Europe from 1815 to 1900, including the history of each major European nation.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 314  Health and Healing in Early Modern Europe

    Description:
    This course explores the ways illness intersected with everyday life in Europe spanning the years 1500-1800. Topics include experiences of childbirth, popular medical texts, witchcraft and magic, plague, religious approaches to healing, and ordinary people's understanding of their bodies. A significant amount of class time will be spent discussing and analyzing primary sources, including diaries, recipes, anatomical texts, casebooks, and literature.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 315  Europe 1900-1945

    Description:
    Political, social and intellectual history of Europe from 1900 to 1945. Emphasis on the origins of the World Wars, European totalitarianism, the Great Depression and inter-war societies.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 316  Europe since 1945

    Description:
    Political, economic, social, and intellectual history of Europe with attention to extra-European influences, from 1945 to the present.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 318  Advanced Topics in History

    Description:
    Intensive study of selected topics in history. Course content is announced during the advanced registration period. Course material is consistent with other advanced level history courses.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 319  History of the Mediterranean

    Description:
    The Mediterranean is a "global player" that has made the peoples of Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa participate in a common path since antiquity. The course analyzes the history of the Mediterranean and the extraordinary interactions between multiple and rich cultural, ethnic and religious backgrounds. From the time of the Greek city-states to the Roman Empire, the Italian Renaissance, the Ottoman Empire and the new scenarios of the 20th century, this course will explore the economy, politics, and religion of three continents developing a unique exchange.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 320  Tudor-Stuart England

    Description:
    An introduction to English history from the high Middle Ages. Emphasis on the political crises of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, to 1660. (Course offered in the fall only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 321  England in the Age of Revolution, 1660 to 1850

    Description:
    English history from 1660 to 1850 with emphasis on the transformation of life and institutions in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 324  Russia and the Soviet Union: Fromt he 1917 Revolution to Putin

    Description:
    The peasant emancipation from serfdom in 1861 left the overwhelming majority of Russians destitute and disenfranchised. How did the subsequent revolutionary movement that promised social and economic equality transform into such a brutally oppressive system under Stalin? How did the Soviet Union become a world superpower and what were the reasons for its downfall? Through the use of primary documents, this course will attempt to answer these questions and emphasize social history: the ideals, aspirations, and actions of ordinary Soviet citizens.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 325  European Expansion

    Description:
    The first European empires began to develop after 1492, challenging Europeans to build complicated relationships with outside societies. This era saw the first example of globalization in the "world trade system." Tremendous growth in the circulation of goods and ideas and the affirmation of the modern perception of "East" and "West" all played significant roles in shaping politics, business, society, and the environment in new ways. This course will examine these issues and related changes from the 1400s to the 1800s.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 326  Hitler, A Man and His Times

    Description:
    A focus on the life and career of Adolph Hitler to elucidate an important period in German and European history. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 327  Germany since 1945

    Description:
    This course traces the emergence of the two distinct German states from a common heritage.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 328  Germany to 1815

    Description:
    Medieval origins of Germany, the Reformation, the rise of Brandenburg-Prussia, the German Enlightenment, the German and the French Revolution.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 329  Germany Fr 1815-1945

    Description:
    German liberalism, nationalism and conservatism in the nineteenth century, the revolution of 1848, unification, World War I, Weimar, and the Nazi Period. (Course offered in the fall only)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 330  The French Revolution

    Description:
    History of the efforts of the French people to overthrow the social system of the old regime and to replace it with one more suited to their needs. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 334  Italy Since 1815

    Description:
    The most significant events in modern Italian history including the Resorgimento, the Giolittian Era, the rise and fall of Fascism, the Republic, and the growth of terrorism.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 339  Modern Irish History from 1800 to present

    Description:
    This course examines the forces and movements in the development of Irish nationalism from 1800 to the achievement of national independence. The course also explores the history of an independent Ireland. (Course offered summer only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 342  Cinema in Hitler's Germany: Movies, Propaganda, Politics in Weimar and Nazi Germany 1919-1945

    Description:
    This course explores the history of German cinema between 1919 and 1945. The first half of the course will focus on the films of the Weimar Republic - a time of bold artistic experimentation when Germany's film industry was second only to Hollywood in worldwide influence. The second half of the semester will be devoted to the cinema produced in Germany during the Nazi dictatorship, when movies were no longer simply entertainment, but also served as an important form of propaganda. The films of both of these periods will be analyzed as historical sources that illuminate the society that produced them.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 343  Hist Europ Ideas II

    Description:
    This course will explore European political, legal, and scientific thinking from the eighteenth century to the present. The semester will cover: the invention of the modern European political subject; European, international, and colonial law; and will investigate shifts in scientific method and practice. The history of modern European ideas includes such topics as social contract theory, liberalism, radical revolutionary thought, sexuality and political subjectivity, theories of just warfare, sovereignty theory, scientific rationalism, positivism, environmentalism, and European humanism and post-humanism.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 344  Great Generals of World War II

    Description:
    This course examines selected great generals fo World War II such as Eisenhower, MacArthur, Montgomery, Rommel, Patton and Vandegrift. Topics include the roles of hte strategist, the supreme commander in coalition warefare, and masters of operational art.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 345  Capitalist Revolution

    Description:
    This is a course that seeks to define capitalism and to chart its progress in the early modern period, from 1492 to the Industrial Revolution. Among topics considered are the debate between Eurocentrist scholars and their critics; the development and impact of long-distance commerce, the slave trade, and New World slavery; the labor regimens, consumption patterns, and popular movements that emerge in a period when many givens of everyday life were called into question. The course includes sections on China and India, and also Spain, Portugal, the Netherlands, France, and England and their New World colonies in Mexico, Peru, Brazil, and the Caribbean.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 346  Women & Gender in African History

    Description:
    This course looks at major themes in African history - precolonial states, the slave trade, colonialism, nationalism, development - from the point of view of women's experiences and knowledge. How does Africa's past look different when women's voices and lives are put at the center of the story? What can be learned from feminist debates about the relevance of gender in African history, especially prior to colonial rule? Drawing on scholarship, primary sources, life stories, fiction and film, this course will examine women's roles in African history as well as the gender ideologies and practices constraining women's agency in the past and today.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 349L  The Cold War: Rise and Fall

    Description:
    This course examines the shifting US and Russian images of each other during the rise and fall of the Cold War. It focuses in particular on the way that issues of difference play out in the US/Soviet/Russian encounter, and on the emergence of public perceptions which linked struggles for racial, gender, and social equality with Communism and its agents. AMST 349L and HIST 349L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 351  Histories of Brazil

    Description:
    What makes Brazil so distinctive? Why is it so unequal? How did it become so powerful, seemingly overnight? And, what is it about all that samba, soccer, and carnaval? This course introduces students to the history and contemporary society of Brazil, a large and increasingly important actor in Latin America, the wider hemisphere, and the world. Additionally, the particularities of Brazilian history can illuminate wider questions relating to social change, economic growth and inequality, exclusion and prejudice, creativity and leadership, and the relationship between humans and their environment, among many other questions.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 352  Topics in African History

    Description:
    An intensive study of selected themes in African history; although the approach is thematic, attention is given to essential chronology and to regional differences. Topics, which vary from semester to semester, include African economic history; pan-Africanism and nationalism; post-colonial Africa: its prospects, developments, and crises; religion in Africa; and African urban history.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 353  Postcolonial India

    Description:
    This course introduces history students to four main themes of post-colonial India (1947 onwards): the practice of electoral democracy in the worlds second-most populous country, the struggle against deep social inequality, the quest to balance economic growth with social justice, and the difficulties of managing religious and cultural diversity on such a gigantic scale. Students will have a chance to think about man y different issues, from religious plurality to communal violence, from Bollywood to economic liberalization, from thriving democracy to festering insurgencies, from nuclear power to non-violence, from secularism to genocide. We will read major writers, commentators and critics who writings on India are well known all over the English-speaking world.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 357  The Vietnam War

    Description:
    This course covers the period from 1945 to 1975, with attention to the Vietnamese Revolution and its American and Vietnamese adversaries. Topics include origins of the Cold War and US policy in Indochina; Vietnam's peasant revolution and Communist Party; society, economy, and ideology of the Saigon milieu; the US anti-war movement; and US soldiers and veterans of the Vietnam War era.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 358  War in the Twentieth Century

    Description:
    A study of military plans, strategy and weapons employed in twentieth century wars, and their consequences on the battlefield, together with their larger impact on the societies involved. Emphasis on the two world wars and the Vietnam War. The course concludes with a review of current military plans and weapons systems of the world powers in the perspective of military history since 1914. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 359L  Women in Modern China

    Description:
    This course examines the social and cultural roles of Chinese women, and their changes over time. Emphasis is given to twentieth-century China, especially the People's Republic period. ASIAN 359L and HIST 359L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 360L  Traditional China

    Description:
    A survey of traditional China from ancient times to about 1800, with emphasis on cultural, intellectual, and social developments. ASIAN 360L and HIST 360L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 361L  The History of Modern China

    Description:
    A survey of the political, social, and intellectual development of China from 1800 to the present, with emphasis on Sino-Western relations and twentieth century reform and revolution. (Course offered in the fall only.) ASIAN 361L and HIST 361L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 363L  Modern Japan

    Description:
    A historical survey of economic, social, political and cultural developments in Japan from 1800 to the present, special consideration of economic and foreign policy problems. ASIAN 363L and HIST 363L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 364  India since 1857

    Description:
    Intended to be an introduction to the Indian subcontinent as it emerged from British rule to independence. Designed for students interested in this area and the Third World, regardless of major. The framework of the course is historical, but it also deals with social and religious institutions such as the caste system, as well as economic and political change in a traditional society.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 365  Iran, Afghanistan, and Pakistan in Modern History

    Description:
    In 1979, three separate events in three different countries marked the beginning of a new era of politics and religion in western Asia. A revolutionary Islamic government took control in Iran, a religiously-motivated military dictator took power in Pakistan, and the USSR invaded Afghanistan, triggering the Afghan Jihad. This course will explore the history leading up to the events of 1979 in the context of global events and political change and religious thought in Western Asia. It will then go on to examine the consequences of these events as they have played out into the new millennium.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 366  The Middle East since 1914

    Description:
    Impact of the Western world on the Middle East and the Middle Eastern response, especially the latter, from 1914 to the present. Comparative analysis of the different societies of the area and their political, economic, and social structures.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 370  Colonial America to 1763

    Description:
    The English background of emigration and settlement. The evolution of imperial institutions; American social, economic, and religious development. Emphasis on political ideas, institutions and behavior in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 371  The American Revolution, 1763-1789

    Description:
    The development of the conflict with Britain, 1763-1776, the Revolutionary War and its effect, the forming of republican institutions for state and federal governments.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 372  The Early Republic

    Description:
    Survey and analysis of the early development of the United States as an independent federal republic. Focus is on key issues: civil liberties, slavery and the first emancipation, federalist economic policy, neutrality, war, institutional growth (presidency, congress, judiciary, political parties), and changes in the social, ideological and cultural environment. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 373  American Slavery

    Description:
    The African-European heritage of slavery, the Atlantic slave trade, the origins of slavery in the United States, its early abolition in the North and continued development in the South, culture of the slave community, black resistance and rebellion, the attack on and the defense of slavery, its final destruction in the Civil War, and the lasting significance of slavery in American life.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 375  The US Civil War and Reconstruction

    Description:
    Causes of the Civil War, its social, political, and ideological history, and the problems and results of Southern Reconstruction. (Course offered in the spring only.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 377  The Old South

    Description:
    The history (social, political, economic, intellectual) of the South and the development of a distinctive region and culture from the first permanent English settlement at Jamestown to the firing on Fort Sumter, with coverage of such topics as climate, staple crop agriculture, economic colonialism, the institution of slavery, the Virginia dynasty, Whitney's gin, the black belt and the rise of King Cotton, Nullification, filibustering, removal of the Indians, Southern violence, women on pedestals, ante-bellum literature and religion, moonlight and magnolias, and the harsh realities of the militant South on the eve of the Civil War.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 379  The United States, 1900 to 1945

    Description:
    American politics and culture from the Progressive period through World War II.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 380  The United States Since 1945

    Description:
    American politics and culture from the end of World War II to the present.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 382  American Indian Treaty Rights, Sovereignty, and Self-Determination

    Description:
    Recently, treaty rights, sovereignty, and self-determination emerged as critical to the survival of American Indian communities and nations. Proactive Native individuals fighting the federal government's efforts to terminate its trust relationship with tribes and advocating for a distinct place in modern American society shaped the emergence of these ideas after World War II. Yet the history of these concepts predates the casinos, activist occupations, fish-ins, and community meetings of the twentieth century. This course examines the longer history in order to understand better the importance of American Indian sovereignty and self-determination today.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 383  History of the American West

    Description:
    With a long and diverse story, the American West has a narrative people by many distinc indigenous peoples, Mexicans and Mexican Americans, Asians and Asian Americans, African Americans, and immigrants form Europeans countries. In this course, we will begin with indigenous peoples before the arrival of Europeans, and then examine their early contacts with the newcomers. The course will then explore an array of topics, including the Spanish in the southwest, the fur and hide trades, the westward expansion of the United States, gold rushes and the arrival of industrialization, farming and the Dust Bowl, the West as myth and commodity, and issues that remain central to the region today, such as American Indian sovereignty, urban growth, conservation, and immigration.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 384  E Pluribus Unum?: American Immigration and Ethnicity

    Description:
    It has been often said that America is a nation of immigrants. This course will examine why so many individuals have come to America over the years, the experiences of foreign-born people in America, how native-born Americans have received those immigrants, how American immigration laws have changed over the years, and what role ethnicity has played in American society. In doing so, we will utilize a variety of sources, including historical monographs, primary sources, movies, and memoirs. We will pay careful attention to the similarities and differences between the experiences of various immigrant groups over time.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 385  American Indians and the Environment

    Description:
    This course examines the changing relationship American Indians have maintained with their local environments as they adapted to new conditions. These changes include migration, increasing involvement with broader economic markets, overhunting, dispossession and modern environmentalism.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 387  US Foreign Policy since 1898

    Description:
    Survey of United States foreign policy and diplomatic relations with other powers from the turn of the century to the present. Emphasis on domestic sources of foreign policies and on such general topics as war: World Wars I and II, Korea and Vietnam, and the Cold War, and the debate over America''s role in world affairs.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 389  The History of Modern Terrorism

    Description:
    This course studies the phenomenon of terrorism by considering twentieth-century political movements that have used or are using terror to achieve their objectives. The course develops an analytical framework for the study of terrorism and uses this framework in exploring the historical backgrounds, objectives, ideologies, tactics, and membership profiles of selected groups, and in considering the responses of their opponents. Groups to be studied include the IRA, the Irgun, the PLO, the Baader-Meinhof, and the Ku Klux Klan.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 392  American Women in Biography

    Description:
    This course introduces major themes of womens history and historiography through the biographies of individual women. Biography allows us to examine not only the lives and times of individuals, but also the considerations historians tackle in trying to represent a life, and the difficulties inherent in researching women who often did not leave public records.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 393L  The Social History of American Women

    Description:
    This course provides a general social history of women in the United States and the institutions that governed their lives-the family, sexual and reproductive practice, child-raising practices, the social organization of work, and control over the means of production. AMST 393L and HIST 393L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 395  The History of Boston

    Description:
    A general survey from 1630 to the present, emphasizing the variety of people who gave this seaport its special character and prominence in American history.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 396  America's National Pastime: The History of Baseball

    Description:
    Baseball has been dubbed Americas Pastime. This course will trace the history of the sport from its mid-nineteenth-century origins to the present day. We will study baseball as a lens through which to understand various social, cultural, and economic changes in American society over the past 150 years. Among the themes we will be discussing: the struggles between labor and capital; the effects of urbanization and industrialization; demographic changes such as immigration and geographic shifts in population; the legacy of racial segregation and race relations; the effects of scandals and corruption; and the role of statistics to measure the interpret the game.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 397  Orphans, Beggars,and "Welfare Moms": The History of Poverty in the United States

    Description:
    The poor are always with us, but in the United States views of the poor have shifted over time. This course will examine who has been seen as worthy of aid and who has been seen as unworthy of help. It will examine what people living in poverty have done for themselves, how they have lived, and how they have responded to the efforts of others to save them. This course will also examine the changing roles of private charity and government welfare from the nations beginning to the present. Finally, we will pay close attention to the roles that race, ethnicity, gender, and age have played in shaping the options of, and limits on, people living in poverty.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 413  Saints, Witches and Heretics

    Description:
    This seminar will examine the types of spirituality that were celebrated and the types that were brutally repressed by the Christian churches of late medieval and early modern Europe (1250-1700). It will compare different interpretations of late medieval Catholicism and then turn to Martin Luther, assessing the major theses of his theological vision and why they led to religious division. The course will then consider varied attitudes to saints, witches, and heretics in Catholic and Protestant Europe. Throughout the semester, the course will explore the interrelationship between these three categories and the ways in which they illuminate the Reformation era.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 415  The Body in the Atlantic World

    Description:
    People tend to view their bodies in fixed, objective terms: bodies are composed of blood, muscles, organs, and bones. Yet conceptions of the body have changed over time as a result of shifting medical knowledge, cultural norms, and beliefs. For example, seventeenth-century Europeans believed the body consisted of four humors. This seminar investigates the bodys history by exploring the ways medical authors, explorers, and ordinary men and women understood, experienced, and pathologized bodies from 1500-1800. In particular, the course examines how trans-Atlantic exchanges of peoples, plants, and disease shaped understandings of bodily difference.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 433  Mussolini

    Description:
    A focus on the life and career of the Italian Fascist premier.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 435  The Invention of Topical Disease

    Description:
    This course explores the origins of the idea of the 'tropics' and 'tropical disease' as a legacy of European colonial conquest and colonization. The aim of the course is to introduce students to broad themes in the history of colonialism as well as shifting paradigms within the history of medicine and science. Students will look at the origins of the idea of the 'tropics as a place of danger and the role of 'Tropical medicine' in construction representations of the 'Other' in European colonial culture.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 440L  United States in a Global Context

    Description:
    This course will situate thhe United States in a global context by considering US and non-US perspectives on key events of the twentieth century. Special focus: Public, media/arts as well as government perspectives. AMST 440L and HIST 440L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 456  Faith and Politics in Islam: Devotion, Reform, and Jihad in Historical Perspective

    Description:
    This course is an exploration of aspects of faith and politics in Islam with a particular focus on South Asia. It will trace the spread of ideas of personal reform, rationalism, and formulation of orthodoxy in Sufi mystical traditions in South Asia and the Middle East. The course then looks at the impact of print cultures and new educational institutions in proposing a unified and singular global Muslim identity. The course will also examine devotional and political movements that are central to contemporary Muslim thought.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 471  Women in the Early Republic

    Description:
    This is a senior seminar on the subject of women in the American early republic. There are several agendas for the course: first, to explore a wide range of womens experiences during the period; second, to examine methods of historical research with a focus on challenges particular to recovering the experiences of women; and third, to apply theories that help frame and contextualize the lives of women in the early republic. Readings for the course will introduce you to the lives of women of all classes, educational levels, races and ethnicities, and their relationships to institutions of male authority. These include the church, the political system, the legal system, and education.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 473  Sites of Calamity: Places of Disaster in U.S. History

    Description:
    This course asks how we understand places where terrible disasters have taken place. How do we memorialize such sites? How do we re-create them? How do we forget them? How does the environmental setting shape how we respond to death or destruction? What is an environmental history of disaster? We will begin with an overall introduction and then study specific disasters by reading and discussion primary and secondary sources. This course should equip each participant to analyze historical materials about contested environments, craft oral and written arguments in environmental history, and read and view current news with an informed perspective.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 478  Special Topics Seminar in History

    Description:
    Course content is announced during the advance registration period. Course material is consistent with other departmental seminar offerings.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 480  Seminar in European History

    Description:
    A problem course intended to give training in historical research and writing. The field of European study varies each semester.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 481  Research & Methods

    Description:
    A problem course intended to give training in historical research and writing. The field of American study varies each semester.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 487  Cooperative Education/Internship, History

    Description:
    Through the cooperative education/internship program majors in the history department are placed in paid work assignments or non-paying internships which relate to studies in applied history. Work periods are generally six months and begin in either January or July. Students are placed by the cooperative education/internship office and awarded credit for study in conjunction with the work experience: typically six credits for full time work and three credits for part time work. Credit is awarded only to students who successfully complete a study plan submitted to and approved by a member of the department. The plan should detail a body of work equivalent to that expected in a classroom-based course for the same number of credits. The study plan should include appropriate reading and writing assignments.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 488  Independent Reading

    Description:
    Guided reading and research; may be used in departmental honors program.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 489  Independent Reading

    Description:
    Guided reading and research; may be used in departmental honors program.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HIST 490  Honors Thesis

    Description:
    A major research paper written under the supervision of a member of the department and defended before an Honors Committee. Students completing this work successfully will graduate with honors in history.   More Info

    Offered in: