Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > HONORS

Honors

  • HONORS 101  Honors First-year Seminar

    Description:
    This course addresses directly, in an introductory fashion, questions of how knowledge is created and communicated in a variety of situations: within academic disciplines, in different cultures, and under changing social and technological conditions. Concrete exercises allow students to explore their own creativity in relation to the opportunities and constraints posed by such situations. Individual instructors may introduce a central topic or theme as well. All sections provide focused instruction in active reading, convincing writing, critical thinking, and oral performance. This course may be used to satisfy the University''s First Year Seminar requirement. (Offered every year.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HONORS 210G  Honors Intermediate Seminar

    Description:
    The Honors College Intermediate Seminar shares the attributes of university-wide intermediate seminars in its attention to developing analytical reading and writing skills, cultivating critical thinking, guiding students to learn how to synthesize material from two or more sources to support an argument, and leading them to understand and practice that writing is a process of revision, with each draft helping the student to gain increasing confidence and ability to articulate and express an idea and its development, culminating in a sustained presentation of a logically constructed enlargement. Self-assessment is a crucial aspect of the Honors College IS, as it is of the university-wide IS, and instructors are encouraged to develop self-assessment tools so that students may evaluate their growth as writers and also learn to recognize their strengths and areas for improvement. The Honors College Intermediate Seminar also requires students to use technology, for example, to access electronic databases for secondary material or construct a powerpoint slideshow for an in-class presentation. The Honors Intermediate Seminar exhibits a central feature of the Honors curriculum: interdisciplinary for content and pedagogy. Thus, and Honors intermediate seminar includes materials from different disciplines (the intermediate seminar on "collecting" for example, draws on readings from psychology, sociology, and history; the intermediate seminar on "Baseball" includes perspectives and analyses of the game from biology, physics, and history). Students are taught how to engage texts and data/information from multiple disciplines, and through the IS pedagogy, they are equipped with the skills to synthesize their understanding of concepts across disparate disciplines. Instruction might also include field trips to significant sites so that students can acquire hands-on experience with relevant materials and interact with practitioners in their work locations. Assignments are designe   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HONORS 242  The Cold War: The Asian View

    Description:
    This course examines how the dropping of the atomic bomb and its justifications helped to launch the Cold War, as traditional assumptions about "oriental" combined with fears of Communism to create a "foreign other." Drawing a parallel with "subversive" and "deviant" domestic enemies, the course concludes by exploring how Asian revolutions shaped Cold War culture in the United States.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HONORS 243  Modern Cuba

    Description:
    The history of Cuba has been marked by repeated movements for social equality, economic opportunity, national identity, and national sovereignty. This course examines these movements in five historical periods, from the abolitionist and independence movements (1800-1880), through the Fidelista revolution and the present day. The focus is interdisciplinary, drawing especially on history, literature, film, and economics. This course fills an international diversity requirement.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HONORS 247  When ordinary People Do Extraordinary Things: Social Movements in the US

    Description:
    This course will explore the history of several major movements for radical change in US history beginning with the populist movement (1882-1896) extending through the radical and labor movements of the progressive era (1886-1936) as well as the civil rights era (1945-65) and concluding with the American Indian and Puerto Rican nationalist movements, (1968-1980). These movements will be examined along three dimensions of inquiry. First, what causes social movements to arise? What conditions, circumstances and events coincide with the appearance of social protest movements? And what kind of leaders, ideas, resources, forms of organizations are associated with the growth and development of strong social movements? Second, what are the consequences of social movements? What happens to them over time in terms of institutionalization, co-optation and repression? In what ways do they succeed in changing society? Are there unintended consequences of social protest? Third, what is the meaning of movement history for todays new social movements? The instructor will present his view of movement history (developed in a recent book called Taking History to Heart) as a way of evoking the poser of the past and as a way of understanding struggles for social justice in our own time. Students will write four short essays applying social movement theories and interpretations to various case studies or addressing challenging questions about how to interpret social movements. Each student will also report on a special subject during one week of class and lead a discussion of a class another occasion.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HONORS 258  Darwinian Medicine

    Description:
    What can we learn about our health by taking an evolutionary perspective on disease, aging, pain, and trauma? The adaptations of our bodies and the adaptations of the parasites (germs & worms) that sometimes make us sick are produced by natural selection, and Darwinian Medicine is concerned with questions of adaptation: Why dont we live longer that we do? Why do our bodies fall apart as we get old? Why do humans, alone in the animal kingdom, have menopause? Why are some germs fairly benign while others are virulent? (Isnt it bad for any germ to kill its host?) Why do we get a fever when we get sick? Should we suppress our fevers? Does sneezing benefit us by expelling germs that are making us sick, or does it benefit the germs by dispersing them? Why does nausea accompany pregnancy (morning sickness)? Why are children more finicky than adults about what they eat? Why hasnt natural selection rid us of our useless and dangerous appendix? Should we treat our sprains with ice and anti-inflammatories, blocking he bodys response to the injury? Why do so many of us have miserable allergic reactions to things that are not harmful? Most mammals recover the nutrients of the womb by resorbing the uterine lining if they are not impregnated during a reproductive cycle. Why do we, and some of our primate cousins, waste energy and nutrients in heavy menstruation? Could there be an adaptive explanation for adolescent acne? The new discipline of Darwinian Medicine has generated some new questions, provided a few interesting hypotheses and sometimes even produced answers! Requirements include regular reading and participation in seminar-style course meetings, weekly quizzes on the readings, one short paper explaining a key concept, and one research paper involving some original work (e.g., generation of new information, analysis of old information, new synthesis of existing literature).   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HONORS 259  Addiction

    Description:
    What is addiction? How do drugs such as cocaine, heroin and nicotine affect the brain and cause addiction? Why is addiction so difficult to cure? We will explore these fundamental questions by learning about the principles of pharmacology, the structure and organization of the nervous system, the basis of chemical neurotransmission, the mechanism of action of drugs of abuse, and the nature of the changes that take place in the brain following exposure to drugs of abuse.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HONORS 290  Special Topics

    Description:
    Courses of special interest in selected fields drawing on the scholarly interests of faculty. Topics vary each semester. Examples include: Beethoven: Romance and Revolution, Reading Joyce, Darwinian Medicine, Environmental Crime and Justice, History of Social Protest, and The Islamic City.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HONORS 380  Honors Colloquium

    Description:
    Through multi-disciplinary study of a topic chosen each semester, the Colloquium explores principles and methods of research common to many fields. Students trace scholarly controversies, frame hypotheses and questions, use print and electronic sources, display data in text and graphic forms, work independently and collaboratively, and present results orally and in writing. Each student prepares a prospectus for an individual research project. (Course offered every semester.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • HONORS 490  Special Topics

    Description:
    Topical coverage in selected fields of scholarly interests directed by members of the faculty.   More Info

    Offered in: