Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > MDNLNG

Modern Languages

  • MDNLNG 210G  Great Books

    Description:
    This course provides instruction and practice in the careful reading, analysis, and enhanced understanding of a limited number of great or classic works of literature, ancient and modern, from various national literary cultures. The readings acquaint students with culturally and/or aesthetically significant literature and heighten their awareness of the centrality of great literature to human experience. Please note: Students may receive credit either for this course or for CORE C150, but not for both. Capabilities addressed: Critical reading, critical thinking, clear writing.   More Info

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  • MDNLNG 220L  Hades, Heaven, and Hell

    Description:
    This interdisciplinary course first explores Hades from Ovid to Cocteau. It then moves to heaven and hell to examine the Christian symbolism of good and evil, angels and devils, sin and redemption in European literature, film, and the arts. HUMAN 220L and MDNLNG 220L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • MDNLNG 255L  Pacting with the Devil: The Faust Tradition

    Description:
    A reading and discussion course emphasizing critical interpretation of major texts in the Faust tradition from German folklore, Christopher Marlowe, J.W. von Goethe, Mikhail Bulgakov and others. Attention is given to the evolution of the legend and to other adaptations (in music and film) of Faustian material. HUMAN 255L and MDNLNG 255L are the same course.   More Info

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  • MDNLNG 260  Imagining the Modern Middle East

    Description:
    This course constitutes an interdisciplinary exploration of contemporary novels, picture books, graphic novels, and films that represent Middle Eastern people(s) and settings. It investigates identify formation and cultural construction, as well as politics and ideology in literature. The course examines how texts construct and perpetuate on often problematic version of cultural identify. Students will explore how unique histories, traditions, and politics are significant factors in reading and analyzing literature and will investigate how literature addressed to the western reader often perpetuates a stereotypical version of the Middle East that homogenizes its populations and fails to account for its complexity. The course can cover a variety of topics and genres including adolescent literature, comic books, the graphic novel, and contemporary fiction about the Middle East. Possible themes for the course include political socialization, religious ideology, indoctrination and dissidence across a range of literary and cultural texts.   More Info

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  • MDNLNG 265L  Icons of East Asia: Stereotypes, gender, and cultural history from geisha girls to martial masters

    Description:
    The purpose of this class is to explore, critically and comparatively, various discourses about popular cultural icons of East Asia. We will focus on two specific well-known examples women entertainers and male figures adapt at martial arts with the following aims: 1) to focus on specific historical contexts, which suggest how and why these categories were formed and became important; 2) to understand how dynamic and motivated these seemingly unchanging and timeless icons actually are; and 3) to investigate how gendered identities are constructed and manipulated for particular goals. ASIAN 365L and MDNLNG 365L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • MDNLNG 276  Europe at the Movies: a History of Postwar Cinema

    Description:
    This course will investigate the most significant developments of film history int he major European contries after World War II. National cinemas of France, Italy, Germany, Scandinavia, and Eastern Europe will be studied in detail through weekly screenings of classic films by some of Europe's most accomplished filmmakers. Films will be analyzed both in a broad socio-historical framework and in respect to authors' specific styles.   More Info

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  • MDNLNG 290  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • MDNLNG 366L  Re-made in Asia: Tellings and re-tellings from the Buddha to Godzilla

    Description:
    What is a "remake"? Why are people interested in stories that are told and re-told, sometimes in many versions? This class explores narratives that travel across time and space in Asia, in order to find some answers to these questions. The purpose of this class is to consider how texts from the past are rendered relevant to concerns contemporary to the remakes. Students are expected to have taken at least one 200-level course related to Asia.   More Info

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  • MDNLNG 368  Shanghai

    Description:
    This course is a multi-disciplinary introduction to one of the most vibrant and cosmopolitan cities of the early twentieth and twenty-first centuries: Shanghai. We begin in the early nineteenth century, when Shanghai rapidly developed into one of the largest ports in the world, investigate the formation of the foreign concessions and the rise of the city to dominance in the Chinese mediasphere at the turn of the twentieth century, consider the citys changing fortunes during the early decades of the Peoples Republic, and inquire into the sources and effects of its return to world city status at the turn of the twenty-first century.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • MDNLNG 390  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • MDNLNG 488L  The Idea of Asia

    Description:
    This course examines the imagination of Asia from a variety of perspectives: historical, economic, religious, philosophical, literary, and artistic. It begin from the extreme social and cultural diversity of the continent as it is currently defined, and asks first, how the idea of a coherent Asia was constructed; and second, what effects this idea has had in both "Asian" and "European" history. This course fulfills the capstone requirement for the Asian Studies major. ASIAN 488L and MDNLNG 488L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA