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Course Catalog

UGRD > PSYCH

Psychology

  • PSYCH 100  Introductory Psychology

    Description:
    A general survey of selected content areas in psychology, including personality and human development, physiological psychology, learning, intelligence, heredity and environment, and motivation and emotion. Please note: Students who have already earned credits for PSYCH 101 may not register for this course.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 101  Introductory Psychology

    Description:
    A general survey of selected content areas in psychology, including personality and human development; physiological psychology; learning; intelligence; heredity and environment; and motivation and emotion. In addition, separately scheduled discussion sessions provide students with the opportunity to work concretely with constructs and methods as they apply to specific problem areas. Please note: Students who have already earned credits for PSYCH 100 may not register for this course.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 105  Biological Foundations in Psychology

    Description:
    This courses provides the basic background in physiology, evolution, genetics, and heredity essential to understanding the content of most required courses in the psychology major. It serves as a foundation for understanding physiological, genetic, developmental, and evolutionary influences on behavior. The course targets students whose prior course work has not given them such requisite biological knowledge.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 141G  Children's Social Worlds: Child and Adolescent Peer Relationships and Social Development

    Description:
    This course offers a broad examination of childrens and adolescents peer relationships; why they are important, how they change over the course of development, why some children are better accepted than others, and how early peer relationship difficulties produce echoing effects in adolescence and adulthood. We explore the important ways in which peer relationships influence childrens emotional, cognitive, and social development. We consider causes of peer difficulty, short and long-term consequences, bullying and victimization, friendships and peer groups, educational and community contexts, familial and cultural influences, and intervention and prevention programs.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 201  Introduction to Behavioral Research

    Description:
    An introduction to the ways of discovering, describing and making warranted assertions about aspects of people and social life. The chief objectives are 1) to help students develop the skills and knowledge necessary to become intelligent critics of research in the behavioral and social sciences, and 2) to give them a rudimentary understanding of the design and evaluation of scientific research. Statistical material is treated in a conceptual manner. Classroom work and course examinations concentrate equally on research design and research evaluation.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 210  Personality

    Description:
    Conceptions of human nature are examined in light of various theories of personality. This course focuses on the theories of Freud, Adler, Sullivan, Erikson, Kelly, Ego psychologists, and other theorists presenting the behavioristic and humanistic perspectives. Among the topics to be addressed are personality structure and its development; stress and coping; neurotic styles; and human motives and their measurement.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 215  Abnormal Psychology

    Description:
    This course examines the range of common psychological disorders, their characteristic symptoms, possible causes, and treatment. It takes a critical scientific approach to the criteria used to define psychological abnormality, the theories used to explain it, and the therapies used to treat it. Etiology, dynamics and treatment of psychopathology.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 230  Social Psychology

    Description:
    A scientific attempt to understand and explain how the thought, feeling, and behavior of individuals are influenced by the actual, imagined, or implied presence of others; focuses on the drama of social interaction.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 234  Psychology of Cross-cultural Relations

    Description:
    This course examines the nature and dynamics of inter-group relations within a multicultural context, studying relations among diverse cultures and racial groups in the United States and globally. The course looks at cross-cultural relations from an interdisciplinary perspective, discussing psychological and sociopolitical perspectives.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 235  Psychology and the Black Experience

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Blacks in the United States, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. Connections between Africa, the Caribbean, and black America will be examined with respect to culture, belief systems, and values. At the same time, we also explore the many differences in history, culture, and experience within the many groups and individuals of African-descent in the U.S.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 236  The Psychology of Women

    Description:
    Psychological theories about women from Freud to the present are examined with emphasis placed on biological and sociocultural perspectives as they have influenced the development of a psychology of women. Special attention is paid to the developmental process and the unique issues and concerns of the female infant, child, adolescent, young adult, and older woman.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 237  Psychology of Sex and Sexuality

    Description:
    This course serves as an introduction to the academic field of "human sexuality," the interdisciplinary study of human sexual behavior and sexual identity across the lifespan. After briefly addressing anatomical and physiological bases of human sexuality, the majority of class meetings will be spent investigating the variety of ways that sexuality influences the lives of all people and the myriad psychological, social, and cultural factors that shape human sexual behavior. Topics include a history of the study of sexuality, as well as gender roles, gender variance, sexual orientation, sexual coercion, pornography, contraception, sexual disorders, sex work, and HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted diseases. The format is interactive lecture and class discussion.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 238L  Asian American Psychology

    Description:
    This course is an introduction to the psychological experience of Asian Americans, including the historical, sociopolitical, and cultural influences that shape personality and mental health in community, family, and individual contexts. The course also explores prevention and intervention possibilities through specific examples, such as trauma and intergenerational conflict, that are relevant for Asian American populations. ASAMST 238L and PSYCH 238L are the same course.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 241  Infancy and Childhood Development

    Description:
    This course explores human development from infancy to middle childhood, i.e., from childbirth to ages seven or eight. Major emphasis is given to early perceptual, cognitive, social and affective development bearing the following questions in mind: How does the world of space and objects appear to the infant? How does he or she acquire knowledge and discover reality? How does the child experience the world of people and develop a sense of self? How does the child develop attachments to others and what role is played by the significant people in his or her life?   More Info

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  • PSYCH 242  Adolescence

    Description:
    This course is designed to acquaint students with psychological characteristics of adolescent development, theoretical approaches to adolescence, and experimental studies of the causes of a variety of behaviors during adolescence. The course also focuses upon major problems and characteristics of adolescents in modern society.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 250  Learning and Memory

    Description:
    An introduction to current views of behavioral change, learning, and remembering. The course focuses on concepts, theoretical issues and applications of current research.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 255  Perception

    Description:
    The traditional problems of perception, with focus on the changing theoretical perspectives within which these problems are viewed. Evolution in theory from early elementalistic approaches to the more current concern with perception-personality relationships.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 271L  Introduction to Cognitive Science

    Description:
    Cognitive science is an interdisciplinary field fundamentally concerned with furthering our understanding of the development, underlying processes, and implementation of language, perception, problem-solving, learning, memory, and other intelligent capacities. This course offers an introduction to this science for all levels of undergraduate majors in psychology, computer science, biology, and other related fields. CS 271L and PSYCH 271L are the same course.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 286  Introductory Research Apprenticeship

    Description:
    The proposed course, a 200-level Research Apprenticeship (PSYCH 286) is designed for students who are interested in being involved in hands-on research, but who are still at the beginning of their studies in the major. Students who are enrolled in this course work with faculty members on topics related to the faculty members research interests.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 290  Special Topics in Psychology

    Description:
    This course is conducted by various members of the faculty with special attention to their fields of scholarly interests. Topics vary by semester.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 301  Psychological Testing

    Description:
    An examination of the assessment process and the methods (tests, interviews observations) used in it. Emphasis on the standards of validity for tests and procedures and on proper test use. Introduction to some major psychological tests.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 333  Group Dynamics

    Description:
    An examination of small group behavior from a theoretical and empirical perspective. The group is viewed as a system functioning in a number of environments-physical, personal, social, and task. Each of these interrelated environments influences various aspects of group process. Thus leadership, power, conformity, status, goals, and others are considered as interrelated processes of social interaction.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 335  Social Attitudes and Public Opinion

    Description:
    This course examines the nature of attitudes, beliefs, and values, and the influences which individuals' attitudes have upon their behavior. Various theories of attitude organization and attitude change are discussed, and the development of social attitudes is explored by examining the differential impact of the family, the educational system, the mass media, and the general social environment. The changing content of public opinion over time and its relationship to the political system are also discussed.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 337  Communication and Society

    Description:
    This course explores interpersonal interaction and the functional and dysfunctional ways in which communication occurs. Participants examine non-verbal communication, including paralanguage, spacing, and gestures. Additionally, they acquire experience using the Internet, for research purposes as well as for on-line communication with other course participants. Discussions also focus on various aspects of the mass media.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 338  Community Psychology

    Description:
    Contributions of psychology to the understanding of human communities. Community mental health, ecological, and social structural approaches to community psychology are examined.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 339  Psychology Of Law

    Description:
    This course provides a basic understanding of the interaction between law and psychology, including developmental, social and clinical psychology. Topics include rules of evidence, statistics in the court, child witnesses, eyewitness testimony recovered memory, criminal investigatory practices, competence to stand trial, and constitutional rights of search and seizure.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 343  The Psychology of Adult Development and Human Aging

    Description:
    A developmental approach to human integrity and functioning in the second half of the life span. Stereotyped ideas about the aging process are critically reviewed. Newer approaches to facilitating psychological well-being in the latter years of life are given special attention.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 346  Language Development

    Description:
    This course focuses on various theoretical approaches to the development of language. Pragmatic, semantic, and syntactic aspects of language acquisition are studied in depth. The role of language-specific, cognitive, and social factors in the process of acquisition are considered, with reference to both normal and disordered populations.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 360  Behavioral Neuroscience

    Description:
    An overview of the field of neuroscience. Selected topics are neuroanatomy, brain physiology, communication in the central nervous system, immunology, and psychopharmacology. This course also includes a critical discussion of various research techniques. One goal for students is to develop critical thinking skills, as consumers of scientific information.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 370  Statistics

    Description:
    The applied study of the scientific method in the behavioral sciences. Fundamental statistical concepts and techniques are surveyed and used, with primary emphasis on the logic underlying the use of descriptive and inferential tools in scientific inquiry. Topics include parametric and non-parametric statistics, e.g., correlation and analysis of variance.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 403  Gender, Culture, and Health

    Description:
    This course studies of health throughout the life span, using theory, research, and practice models emerging in health psychology, community-based public health, and work addressing gender and racial disparities in health and mental health. Through individualized journals and final projects, students will study interventions mobilizing individual, family, and social resources preventing illness and promoting health in diverse settings.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 406  Race, culture, and relationships: An applied psychological perspective

    Description:
    Psychological research indicates that interactions between individuals are affected not only by each individual's intentions, but also (often unconsciously) by their cultural backgrounds, personal statuses, and related experiences within systems of power and privilege, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, or social class. This seminar provides an introduction to developing understandings, awareness, and skills that are the foundation of positive authentic relationships and contributions to social justice in personal contexts as well as in professional relationships such as roles as counselors or other kinds of human service providers.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 415  Psychological Trauma: Individual and Society

    Description:
    This course explores the theory, research, and phenomenology of response to such traumatic events as combat, rape, and concentration camp survival. It examines normative psychological processes, common symptom picture, and the developmental, sociocultural, and personality factors that influence response. Discussions also focus on present and past controversies within the research, and on the personal, social, and professional implications of the material.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 420  Principles of Psychotherapy

    Description:
    Psychotherapy is defined and a number of existing systems of psychotherapy are studied and compared through close reading of cases reported in the literature by the originators of each system.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 430  Internship in Psychology

    Description:
    An internship course to give students the opportunity of combining human service or research in an area of psychology with a weekly seminar where they can reflect on their field experiences. As part of the seminar, students are expected to attend its weekly meetings and to complete readings and a written term project relevant to their field experience as worked out in consultation with the faculty coordinator.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 431  Psychology Internship: Community-Based Organizations

    Description:
    A field placement course with two primary components: (a) direct human service work experience in a community based setting and (b) a weekly seminar that combines didactic focused learning about the needs and experiences of the specific community of focus and an opportunity for reflection on the community based placement work in order to develop human service delivery skills.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 436  Religion, Spirituality, and Health

    Description:
    Students in this course will critically evaluate the empirical evidence and methodological issues in a growing body of research that links religion and spirituality to various health outcomes across the lifespan including: coping with cancer and HIV/AIDS; mental illness including anxiety, depression, and schizophrenia; alcohol and drug use; and mortality. Students also will explore the effects of Western and Eastern religious and spiritual practices intended to promote physical and mental well-being.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 441  The Family and the Child: A Psychological View

    Description:
    The role of the family in the psychological development of the child. A psychodynamic view of the family, examining stages of development from the third trimester of pregnancy to sixteen years of age.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 445  The Transition to Adulthood

    Description:
    The goal of this course is to examine the individual, socio-demographic and policy factors that have given rise to this new developmental stage of "emerging adulthood." Students will examine theories and research related to the stage of emerging adulthood with a focus on the ways in which context shapes development. Context includes both micro and macro-level influences on emerging adulthood (e.g., sociohistorical context, race/ethnicity, gender, and economic conditions). The topics include: historical comparisons of emerging adulthood; cultural, ethnic, and gender identity; family and romantic relationships; friendships; and education and career choices.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 447  Cognitive Development

    Description:
    This course explores the general question of how thinking develops. Particular emphasis is placed on understanding the development of thinking in childhood and on identifying those aspects of children's approaches to conceptualizing, theorizing, and remembering which are changing during this time. Some attention is also given to understanding possible mechanisms of cognitive change.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 449  Developmental Disorders

    Description:
    This course examines the underlying causes of developmental changes in the brain and behavior that result in childhood neurobehavioral disorders. Attention is given to the neuropsychological outcome of premature infants, infants with genetic/chromosomal disorders (such as Down syndrome, or fragile X syndrome), and infants with problems resulting from environmental exposures (drugs, chemicals, and maternal illnesses).   More Info

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  • PSYCH 450  Cognitive Psychology

    Description:
    An exploration of how human beings develop strategies for obtaining information from their environment, and how this information is organized, stored, and retrieved for later use.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • PSYCH 460  The Neuropsychology of Higher Cognitive Processes

    Description:
    The neural basis of higher cognitive functions, such as perception, language, and memory, including a consideration of human brain damage and psychological tests used to assess such damage.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 461  Neurotoxicology: Effects of environmental agents on the brain and behavior

    Description:
    Neurotoxicology examines the effects of toxic substances in the environment upon nervous system functioning. The course explores the actions of toxicants on adult functioning as well as on the development of the nervous system and behavior. Principles of toxicology, cellular and molecular mechanisms of action, and federal regulations are examined to provide foundational knowledge of the major classes of neurotoxicants.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • PSYCH 462  Psychopharmacology

    Description:
    A survey of the background and history of psychoactive drugs, their current uses as research and therapeutic tools, and the difficulties in appraising their effects. Particular attention is given to the effects of drugs on the development of new fields of inquiry such as neuropsychopharmacology and influences on older fields such as biological psychiatry, etc.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • PSYCH 463  Substance Abuse & The Brain

    Description:
    This course examines commonly abused substances and their psychobiological effects. Accordingly, it surveys a variety of "street drugs" - from crack/cocaine marijuana, oxycodone "E" to inhalants - focusing on the interaction with the brain reward and stress systems. Also explored are gender/age interactions as they relate to propensity to "try" and abuse drugs, especially during adolescent years.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 464  Biological Rhythms in Brain and Behavior

    Description:
    This course will be an introduction to the field of biological rhythms. In this course, students will examine biological clocks at multiple levels including theoretical aspects, organismal and system level studies, and cellular and molecular analyses. The course will cover numerous examples that illustrate the important impact of rhythms on both psychological and biological functioning.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 465  The Psychobiology of Development

    Description:
    Problems in behavioral development are explored from an evolutionary perspective. A major emphasis of the course is on the formulation of general principles of development applicable to a wide variety of species. A second emphasis is on interpreting the relation of the animal literature to an understanding of human development. Specific topics are drawn from naturalistic studies of animal and human development and from studies exploring the relation between biology and behavioral development.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • PSYCH 466  Hormones and Behavior

    Description:
    This course studies relationships between behavior and the neuroendocrine system studied in diverse behavioral systems of animals, including humans. Participants acquire an understanding of the complex interactions between hormones and behavior; study endocrine bases of sex differences, reproduction, affiliation, aggression, homeostasis, biorhythms, and other behavioral systems; explore clinical implications; and learn to read, evaluate, and discuss original research findings.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 467  Evolution and Behavior

    Description:
    Comparative biological study of the behavior of humans and other animal species. Neural, endocrine, genetic, and developmental mechanisms of behavior are examined within an evolutionary framework.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • PSYCH 468  Science of Human Sexuality

    Description:
    This course introduces the topic of human sexuality in an evidence-based, scientific manner, focusing especially on its biological and neurobiological underpinnings. The class also explores the history and methods of sex research, including animal behavior research, sexual evolution, sexual differentiation of body and brain anatomy, the nature of physical attractiveness, as well as scientific study of the wide range of human sexual behaviors.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 470  History, Systems, and Theories of Psychology

    Description:
    This course explores the theoretical and methodological problems of contemporary psychology-especially clinical psychology-in historical perspective. It provides a broad overview of the development of psychology as an independent discipline and of the various sub-specialties in the field; and it evaluates the significance of new movements and methods by examining intellectual antecedents and underlying assumptions.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 475  Experimental Methods: Learning and Perception

    Description:
    The course is focused on the use of laboratory methods and research design in the traditional areas of experimental psychology (e.g., perception, learning, problem solving). Students design experiments, collect and analyze data and report their findings. The objectives of the course are to help students develop knowledge of the logic and techniques of experimentation, along with the skills required to use this knowledge.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 476  Experimental Methods: Physiological

    Description:
    Lab research on selected topics in physiological psychology, including hormonal influences, brain-behavior relationships, and mechanisms of reward and punishment. Emphasis is on the acquisition of research skills through the use of surgical, histological and statistical techniques in investigations mainly derived from computer-simulated data bases.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 477  Experimental Methods: Social

    Description:
    The general purpose of the course is to introduce the students to experimental research methods in social psychology. Class activities include examination of the relevant literature, participation in pre-designed studies, and the formulation, carrying out, and analysis of an original research project. The student has an opportunity to become familiar with the use of laboratory equipment such as audio and video recorders.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 478  Experimental Methods: Personality and Abnormal Psychology

    Description:
    This course immerses students in research literature in personality and abnormal psychology and prepares students to conduct their own empirical research. Students learn how to read and critique research articles, use databases for literature searches, write a literature review, design a research project, analyze data using a statistical package, and write a paper in the form of a journal article.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 479  Psychology Internship: Field Placement in Early Child Development

    Description:
    This course is a field laboratory course fulfilling two distinct functions: (a) it exposes the student to children in a naturalistic setting (e.g., day care center or elementary school); (b) it exposes the student to research methods typically used by developmental psychologists. Students collect data from placements, analyze them, and submit a written report on their work.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 484  Field Placement in Child and Adolescent Development

    Description:
    This is a field placement course with two complementary components: (a) students complete a field placement working with children or adolescents in a naturalistic setting (e.g., youth program, camp, school), and (b) students participate in a seminar focused on theory and research from clinical, community, and developmental psychology that is relevant to their field placement. Content and assignments create opportunities for students to reflect on their fieldwork experiences and to make connections between the theory, research, and skills covered in the seminar and their direct experiences in the field placement.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • PSYCH 486  Research Apprenticeship in Psychology

    Description:
    This course is designed to provide undergraduate majors in psychology with opportunities to participate in empirical research under the direction of a full-time faculty member. Students may be involved in all aspects of research including review of the literature, selection of tasks and measures, preparation of experimental protocols, data collection, coding and analysis. This course is open only to psychology majors.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 488  Directed Study in Psychology

    Description:
    Independent work on special problems or in certain fields of psychological interest. Students must make arrangements with individual instructors and have projects approved by the department.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 489  Directed Study in Psychology

    Description:
    Independent work on special problems or in certain fields of psychological interest. Students must make arrangements with individual instructors and have projects approved by the department.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 490  Special Topics in Psychology

    Description:
    Conducted by various members of the faculty with special attention in their fields of scholarly interest. Topics vary by semester.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 496  Honors Research

    Description:
    Independent study; the research, writing and defense of thesis.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 497  Honors Research

    Description:
    Independent study; the research, writing and defense of thesis.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 498  Senior Honors Seminar I

    Description:
    An intensive program of directed research combined with weekly discussion.   More Info

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  • PSYCH 499  Senior Honors Seminar II

    Description:
    An intensive program of directed research combined with weekly discussion.   More Info

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