Academics

Upcoming Seminars

Upcoming Seminars

Spring 2016 Seminars

 

All Physics Seminars are held in S-3-126 at 1pm on Thursday, unless otherwise noted.

 

 

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Thursday, Feb 11, 1:00pm

 

Joseph Formaggio
MIT

 

Weighing Neutrinos

 

Neutrino oscillation experiments performed throughout the latter half of the twentieth century have yielded valuable information on the nature of neutrino masses and mixings. The evidence gathered has provided the first positive evidence for physics beyond the standard model. Currently, a new suite of precision experiments will come online to provide greater insight into the physics and significance of neutrino mass. This talk will review our current state of knowledge on neutrino masses, and how new experiments---specifically classical experiments using beta decay---will complement that knowledge in years to come.

 

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Thursday, Feb 18, 1:00pm

 

TBA
TBA

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Feb 25, 1:00pm

 

TBA
TBA

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Mar 3, 1:00pm

 

TBA
TBA

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Mar 10, 1:00pm

 

TBA
TBA

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Mar 17, 1:00pm

 

NO SEMINAR
Spring Break

 

 

 

 

 

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Thursday, Mar 24, 1:00pm

 

Rama Bansil
Boston U

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Mar 31, 1:00pm

 

Ilija Zeljkovic
Boston College

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Apr 7, 1:00pm

 

Jeffrey Sokoloff
Northeastern U

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Apr 14, 1:00pm

 

TBA
TBA

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

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Thursday, Apr 21, 1:00pm (date to be confirmed)

 

Igor Pikovski
ITAMP/Harvard U

 

Time dilation in quantum interference - from the quantum twin paradox to decoherence

 

We consider how gravitational time dilation affects low-energy quantum systems. In a quantum version of the “twin paradox” a clock is brought in superposition of being at two different gravitational potentials. We show that time dilation induces entanglement between internal degrees of freedom and the center-of-mass, which can be probed in optical or matter-wave interferometry. In addition, we derive that time dilation causes decoherence of all composite quantum systems. Our results show that the interplay between quantum theory and general relativity offers novel phenomena and that such a regime can be accessed in quantum optical experiments.

 

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Thursday, Apr 28, 1:00pm

 

Jonathan Cannon
Brandeis U

 

A mathematical framework for the transmission of oscillations and information among neuron populations

 

Oscillatory electrical activity is ubiquitous in the brain at a wide range of frequencies, each with different behavioral correlates in different brain regions. The "communication though coherence" hypothesis states that coordination between oscillating populations can dynamically facilitate or prevent information flow between them. This hypothesis links two often separate fields of mathematics -- dynamical systems and information theory -- and raises questions in both fields. On the dynamical systems side, what is the appropriate mathematical framework in which to understand the emergence and stability of this coordination between strongly interacting oscillatory populations? On the information theory side, how can we describe and quantify transfer of information among a network of spiking populations in dynamically variable conditions? I will share my thesis work on the first question, involving a search for invariant manifolds in the state space of a rhythmic neuronal system, and my more recent work on the second, in which I formalize the notion of communication between inhomogeneous (e.g., periodically forced) point processes.

 

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Thursday, May 5, 1:00pm

 

Markus Greiner
Harvard U

 

TBA

 

TBA