Upcoming Seminars

 

UMass Boston Physics Colloquia

 

Talks are on Thursdays, 1:00 pm, at S(cience)-3-126, unless stated otherwise

 

=====================================================

 

 

Thursday, Sep 21, 1:00pm

 

Ryan Goh
Boston U

 

Pattern Formation in the wake of growth mechanisms

 

Externally mediated, or “triggered,” spatial patterns have become a topic of recent interest in many fields, where researchers wish to harness natural pattern forming processes to form novel and functional materials. Such mechanisms arise in many different types of natural and man-made physical systems such as quenching interfaces in alloy melts, moving masks in ion bombardment, growing interfaces in biological systems, and traveling reaction fronts. These mechanisms can be encoded mathematically in a step-like parameter dependence that allows patterns in a half plane, and suppresses them in the complement, while the boundary of the pattern-forming region propagates with fixed normal velocity. We use techniques from dynamical systems and functional analysis, as well as numerical continuation algorithms, to explore how these mechanisms affect the pattern left in the wake, finding for example how wave numbers depend on speed of the moving parameter interface. In this talk we will discuss recent results in both one and two spatial dimensions for prototypical models for pattern forming systems such as the Cahn-Hilliard, Complex Ginzburg-Landau, Swift-Hohenberg, and reaction-diffusion systems.

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Sep 28, 1:00pm

 

Kennet Rothwell
UMass Boston, Classics

 

The Beginnings of Physics and Astronomy in Classical Greece

 

How the Greeks realized that magical and irrational explanations of natural phenomena could be supplanted by approaches that resemble what we would recognize as science. The idea of the atom, and competing theories about how the world works.

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Oct 5, 1:00pm

 

Kennet Rothwell
UMass Boston, Classics

 

The "Pinnacle" of Greek Science in the Hellenistic Period, and How It All Fell Apart

 

Aristotle vs. Plato on respect for empirical evidence vs. the urge to quantify. Archimedes’ mathematical advances. Hellenistic astronomical data collection. Ptolemy’s doomed epicycle theory.

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Oct 12, 1:00pm

 

NO SEMINAR

 

 

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Oct 19, 1:00pm

 

NO SEMINAR

 

 

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Oct 26, 1:00pm

 

Matthew Headrick
Brandeis U

 

Quantum entanglement and the geometry of spacetime

 

Recent developments in the study of quantum gravity have revealed a surprising and beautiful connection between quantum entanglement and the geometry of spacetime. This discovery offers a new perspective on old puzzles concerning black holes, and may lead to a profoundly new way of thinking about the emergence of spacetime from fundamental quantum-mechanical building blocks. I will describe these developments, explaining along the way the necessary background in quantum gravity and quantum information theory.

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Nov 2, 1:00pm

 

Ayo Awobode
UMass Boston

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Nov 9, 1:00pm

 

Benoît Pausader
Brown U

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Nov 16, 1:00pm

 

Ben Rogers
Brandeis U

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Nov 23, 1:00pm

 

NO SEMINAR
THANKSGIVING RECESS

 

 

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Nov 30, 1:00pm

 

Jonathan Habif
USC Information Sciences Institute

 

Quantum-Enabled Sensing and Communications

 

In the early 1980’s quantum computing and quantum key distribution were proposed as two applications that could capitalize on the non-classical properties of light and matter to assist in specialized information processing tasks. In the intervening decades, few additional applications for non-classical light have been discovered, owing in large part to the fragility of non-classical states in the presence of loss and noise in realistic environments. In this talk I present a suite of new applications that can be enabled with a deep understanding of the quantum properties of light, with a particular focus on understanding quantum mechanical states of light generated by classical sources (such as a laser). Additionally, I will discuss the search for novel ways of detecting light to achieve quantum-limited performance for specialized tasks in sensing and communications.

This talk will be presented at a level accessible to an undergraduate student with deep interest in science and engineering. Throughout the talk, I will discuss exciting opportunities for internships, graduate studies and future careers that intersect basic science and critically important topics in engineering.

Brief Bio:
Dr. Jonathan L. Habif is an experimental physicist and research lead at the University of Southern California information Sciences Institute (ISI). His research has focused on photon-starved, classical communication and imaging, quantum-secured optical communications in free-space and fiber, and integrated nano-photonic for both classical and non-classical applications. Prior to joining ISI, Dr. Habif was with BBN technologies where he served as principal investigator for a number of DARPA-sponsored research programs, partnering with university collaborators to demonstrate revolutionary optical technologies impacting traditional communications, sensing and computation systems.
Dr. Habif earned a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester in the field of superconducting quantum computing and continued this course of research as a postdoctoral associate at MIT.

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Dec 7, 1:00pm

 

Brian Skinner
MIT

 

TBA

 

TBA

 

=====================================================

=====================================================

 

Thursday, Dec 21, 1:00pm, S-3-126
(UNUSUAL DATE or/ and TIME or/and LOCATION)

 

Vincent Lorent
Paris 13 U

 

Responses of Antlion Euroleon nostras to natural and artificial vibratory signal

 

Antlions are neuropter insects with the specificity that they experience a long time interval (almost 3 years) in a larvae stage from which they receive this vernacular name of "ant lion". These are sedentary predators digging pits in sands and or dry soils and waiting for their preys, usually in the form of ants. It is documented that the larva is extremely sensitive to ground vibration by the crawling of light-weighted insects. The objective of this study is to quantify the performances of this vibration detection. The experimental approach consists in correlating behavior observations with synthetic vibrations propagating through the soil media and inducing such behaviors.

 

=====================================================