Academics

Critical Reading and Writing Courses

First-year Critical Analysis courses introduce students to the principles of college-level learning and provide them with intensive practice in the use of those principles. Critical Analysis courses also include a mid-career-level course, CRW 221, intended for new transfer students.

Critical Reading and Writing 111 and 112

The goals and capabilities of Critical Reading and Writing (CRW) 111 and 112 are the same as those of First-Year Seminars. Students learn how to engage with and evaluate texts and issues drawn from the social sciences, humanities, and physical sciences. These courses include computer lab and library research components.

CRW 111—Critical Thinking I :  All sections of this course focus on the critical thinking, reading, and writing needed to succeed in college level studies. Using materials drawn from various disciplines in the college curriculum, students develop their ability to recognize and discuss ideas. By learning to relate generalization to supporting ideas and to identify the patterns into which ideas are structured, students gain practice in applying effective strategies for understanding college material. The class meets on a regular basis in a computer lab where students use computers to develop these analytical capabilities and apply them to course work.
3 Lect Hrs, 3 Credits. This course should be followed by First-Year Seminar SEMINR 114G.

Recent CRW 111 course topics include: Foreign Policy: Ideology and Intervention and Storytelling and Oral Traditions. Contact Academic Support Programs for information on current CRW 111 topics and schedules.

CRW 112—Critical Thinking II:  In all sections of this course, students gain experience in the processes of intellectual inquiry as it is practiced in the liberal arts and sciences. Through both oral and written presentations, they analyze and interpret readings taken from college-level texts. They learn to distinguish the methods authors use in developing their ideas and the differences and similarities among perspectives of various authors, as well as to recognize implications and to question authors' purposes. The class meets on a regular basis in a computer lab where students use computers to develop these analytical capabilities and apply them to course work.
3 Lect Hrs, 3 Credits. This course should be followed by a First-Year Seminar.

Recent CRW 112 course topics include: Decision-making in the Courts and Other Contexts, Exploring Identity, and Reading American Culture. Contact Academic Support Programs for information on current CRW 112 topics and schedules.

Critical Reading and Writing 221

In CRW 221—Interdisciplinary Critical Thinking, a course developed for sophomore through senior level transfer students with 30-89 credits, the goals and capabilities are the same as those of Intermediate Seminars. Students complete one Writing Proficiency Requirement Portfolio supporting paper as part of their CRW 221 coursework.

Interdisciplinary Critical Thinking: In this course, intermediate level students practice critical thinking strategies and examine acquired knowledge by making inquires such as: How is knowledge transformed when it is transferred to new academic communities? What discipline-specific expectations can students meet by depending on prior experience? How do research criteria and restrictions differ by discipline and learning institution? Why should we be concerned about recognizing which schemata and theories work across disciplines?
3 Lecture Hours, 3 Credits This course is usually followed by an Intermediate Seminar. Prerequisites: Transfer students with 30+ credits including both ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or permission of the instructor.

Recent CRW 221 course topics include:  The Role of Prior Knowledge in Teachers', Students', and Other Authors' Work. Contact the office of Academic Support Programs for information on current CRW 221 topics and schedules.