Center for Peace, Democracy, and Development

at the University of Massachusetts Boston

Democratic Development

CPDD believes that a capable, responsible government plays an integral part in the development of democratic nations. CPDD democracy promotion goals are to foster great public participation in decision-making and to increase the responsiveness of governance to human security needs.  With a particular focus on strengthening local governments, CPDD has been working on democratic promotion in Africa and elsewhere since 1987.  

Central to democratic governance is the development of conflict resolution systems at multiple levels in society. CPDD provides assistance in developing national consensus building mechanisms and conflict resolution skill sets, and local approaches to building mediation and restorative justice systems.

CPDD also believes in the intrinsic relationships between the development of democratic institutions and the development of sound economies. We are also committed to the notion of rural development and Making Markets Work for the Poor (W4P) programs.

We also believe that the development of a healthy and competitive entrepreneurial spirit is essential for developing the lives of young people and expanding the range of options that people in developing countries have for their futures. We also believe that education is perhaps the key element for success in a global economy and universities and other training institutions have a major role to play in a nation’s economic development.

CPDD believes that a competent, independent media is one of the cornerstones for social and economic development.  Whether covering politics or the courts, reporting on corruption or criminal behavior, or simply sharing the stories of people's everyday lives, we qualify media as a basic human right.  Particularly important in conflict  and post-conflict situations, CPDD's media approach is well suited for these types of challenging social realities.  We believe that economic sustainability is the key critical factor in media development and our approach reflects this view.