Center for Governance and Sustainability

at the University of Massachusetts Boston

Bribery

pg. 14: a new global multi-stakeholder partnership to scale the “supply side” (i.e., business) commitment to a zero tolerance policy with respect to bribery [bold in original] as a complement to official “demand side” efforts by governments to strengthen policy in this respect.

Readers' Guide Comment on “a new global multi-stakeholder partnership to scale the ‘supply side’ (i.e., business) commitment to a zero tolerance policy with respect to bribery”

Government officials who have accepted a bribe can be legally sanctioned and imprisoned for corruption under international and national agreements. During the negotiations for the UN Convention Against Corruption, there were draft provisions that extended the scope of the convention to the ‘supply side’ and to intra-firm transactions. At the insistence of MNCs and OECD representatives, these provisions were dropped. WEF’s call for a “commitment to zero tolerance policy with respect to bribery” means it too is not prepared to hold the source of the bribery, most often executives within a MNC, to the same criminal sanctions as those that apply to the recipient, most often governmental officials.

Related Ideas: Key third and fourth tools; Public-private governance; Managing financial governance; Options for the judicial system; Aligning values and governance

The Readers' Guide welcomes comments with alternative examples or counter examples, supplemental assessments of the extracted GRI text or commentary – critical or otherwise – of the above interpretation of GRI’s perspective.

Submit Comment



Is a great white shark larger than an frog?

* Please note only your name and comment will be displayed publicly on this page.