Collins Center Offers Professional Development Course for Managers

Sandra Blanchette | January 14, 2010
Collins Center Offers Professional Development Course for Managers

The McCormack Graduate School’s Collins Center for Public Management is pleased to announce its first professional development course for managers in the public and nonprofit sectors. A six-module online course in performance management will be offered through the university’s Division of Corporate, Continuing and Distance Education for the first time in March 2010. “Performance Management in Government and nonprofits “will provide public sector and nonprofit managers the tools necessary to help their organizations realize the value of setting goals, measuring performance and using the resulting data as a management tool to improve outcomes. Using the latest in online technology, this course will be offered in a manner that presents material in an intuitive way. It is a very user-friendly presentation for those new to online education.

“This course charts new ground for us in a several ways,” says McCormack Graduate School Dean Stephen Crosby. “First, it highlights the Collins Center’s growing reputation as a leader in public sector and nonprofit performance management. The second, the use of CCDE’s online delivery system gives working professionals the opportunity to further their education and skill development while staying in their jobs. Third, the fact that the course is delivered online lets us export our expertise across the country and around the world.”

In the current environment of heightened accountability, government organizations and nonprofits are increasingly adopting management approaches focused on using goals and performance indicators to increase effectiveness and communicate accomplishments. Municipal, state, and federal government employees, as well as nonprofit managers interested in better understanding this approach to management and in building related skills, will benefit from this course. The knowledge and tools gained from this course will be extremely valuable in helping to set an organization on a path of management for results.

This introductory course in performance management has been designed specifically for public sector managers and nonprofit officials at all levels of experience. The course was adapted from a McCormack Graduate School of Policy Studies course taught by former Collins Center Director Shelley Metzenbaum, PhD, who assumed the position of Associate Director of the Office of Management and Budget for performance and personnel management in the Obama Administration last fall. Knowing what and how to measure will help raise your organization to a higher level of achievement.

  • For those managers just starting out or changing career fields, this course will familiarize them with performance management techniques, give them the ability to use goals and indicators, and give them a set of in-demand skills to help build their careers.
  • For those who have been in management for a while, this course will add a solid understanding of how to use goals and performance indicators to their toolkits and begin to play a leadership or partnering role in building such systems within their organizations.
  • For senior managers, this course will help identify whether and how they might want to introduce or improve the use of goals and measures within their organizations and teach them how to avoid some of the pitfalls.

This course is the first in the center’s program of professional development courses to benefit the public and nonprofit sectors. The Collins Center plans to offer additional courses, certificate programs, and internships to enhance the educational opportunities for those interested in public service. For more information about Performance Management in Government and Nonprofits, or to suggest courses for development, contact Sandy Blanchette, Education Program Developer at the Collins Center (sandy.blanchette@umb.edu or 617.287.5534)

Tags: collins center , mccormack , the point

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