Academics

Course Catalog

GRAD > HIST

History

  • HIST 600  Research Seminar

    Description:
    This is the introductory course in historical research and methods. Readings draw upon diverse historical materials, with special attention to primary materials. Emphasis is given to the development of research and writing skills. It is normally taught in American history. (Course offered every semester.)   More Info

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  • HIST 602L  Historical Sequence I: American Society and Political Culture: 1600-1865

    Description:
    The course follows the evolution of American society and political culture from the colonial period to the Civil War. The concept "political culture," as used here, embraces institutions, public behavior, and above all, attitudes-beliefs, values, expectations, fears-regarding the distribution and exercise of political power. Two momentous events, the wars for independence and union, are major course milestones at which the development of political culture is assessed from the perspective of different social groups, including leaders, artists, writers, women, workers, and slaves. A central theme is the interplay between regional divergences and national convergences. Thematic questions running through the course are: Did a common political culture emerge? Who was included, who excluded? Was American political culture distinctive? AMST 602L and HIST 602L are the same course.   More Info

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  • HIST 605  Colloquium

    Description:
    This is the introductory course in historiography. A topic, varying from year to year, is treated in the light of past and present schools of historical thought. Emphasis is given to the development of analytical skills. The colloquium is normally taught in European history. (Course offered every semester.)   More Info

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  • HIST 610  American Historical Tradition

    Description:
    The American Historical Tradition provides an introduction to the history of American history writing. It is intended to introduce the student to the varieties of historical interpretation, to point out the contextual influences that shaped those interpretations and to indicate the contingent nature of the interpretations and scholarship produced. In so doing, the student will learn how to evaluate past and contemporary scholarship, see how it moves from research to finished narrative, and obtain a perspective on the contingent nature of ones own research.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 620  Public History Colloquium: Public History and Popular Memory

    Description:
    The Colloquium will introduce students to the field of public history in general and to the various forms it takes. Students will examine the literature of public history including studies of: *the ways in which history is used in the public sphere to influence debates about cultural issues and government policies; * how oral history is used in various public settings, including school class rooms; * how history is used by public interest groups, religious and ethnic groups, businesses, media outlets, labor unions and social movements; * the theory and methodology used in research on historical memory; * how memory and history are interpreted by documentary film makers; * the civil debates over the ways in which the past is memorialized, celebrated and interpreted for the public and the degree to which citizens are involved in interpretation. * how public history is used in a historic site like the Paul Revere House (a class will be conducted there) and in other historical locations in the Boston area. * how the field is emerging as an area of prospective employment.   More Info

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  • HIST 625  The Art and Craft of Interpretation in Public History

    Description:
    In this course students will examine historic preservation, museum collecting, exhibition development, community cultural development, and more. In addition to lectures and discussions, the course will feature presentations from practitioners in a range of topics including museum curators, archivists, historical preservationists, historical tour guides, interpreters and docents on walking and riding tours and in historical parks and homes. This course focuses on the work that public historians do: techniques, concerns, and practical issues. Students will see what happens behind the scenes in museums and other cultural organizations in order to understand how the people who work in these institutions make decisions about content, interpretation, and presentation. The course is organized into three parts. First, students will address the fundamental question in any discussion of historical preservation and interpretation: what is worth saving, what is worth remembering, and why? How do we as individuals and as communities decide what we want to keep? What is the role of the curator or documentary maker or historic preservationist in that process? How are those desires carried out by the museums and other institutions that are the keepers of memory and the shapers of cultural historical interpretation? Second, students will consider the ways in which the things we save and remember are interpreted, presented to the public. Third, students will examine the institutions that do this preserving and presenting.   More Info

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  • HIST 636  Weimar Germany

    Description:
    An examination of German life and culture under the Weimar Republic, chiefly through studies of diverse primary sources ranging from memoirs and public addresses to literature, the arts, and architecture. Each student investigates one aspect of Weimar history using the available primary source material (in translation) and delivers an oral presentation and a final major paper.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • HIST 638L  Politics, Literary Culture and Theatrical Media in London, 1658-1725

    Description:
    This course examines the interaction of politics, literary culture and various theatrical media ranging from plays to street protests in London between the Restoration and the monarchy in 1660 and the South Sea Bubble scandal and its aftermath, around 1725. The obsessions of this highly visual and verbal culture will be emphasized, including criminal confessions and hangings, royal mistresses and illicit sexuality, and religious intolerance and mob violence. A website with material on the topography and political culture of London will be an integral part of the course and students will have the option of doing a web project, instead of a conventional term paper. ENGL 638L and HIST 638L are the same course.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 644  Topics on the History of the American Revolution

    Description:
    This seminar will focus upon a specific question, theme, or emphasis on the history of the American Revolution. It may engage a historiographic problem--Beard's economic interpretation of the Constitution; a thematic question--the economic or social consequences of the Revolution; or a single event--The Stamp Act Riots or the Boston Tea Party, as vehicles for a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of American independence.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 655  Themes in American Indian History

    Description:
    Scholars have recently reframed American Indian History. The last two decades of publication have expanded from basic Native agency to exploring American Indians on their own terms and within their own historiographical framework. This graduate seminar examines the themes and literature emerging from the newest transformation of the field. Each week, we will read and discuss books and articles illustrating major themes and historical debates in this field. For your final project, you will craft a polished historiographical piece analyzing the important works on a topic of your choice within American Indian History.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 662  Immigration and Ethnicity

    Description:
    This graduate-level seminar will provide students with an in-depth look at the history of American immigration and ethnicity. The course will look at four basic themes: the diverse experiences of immigrants; the reaction to immigrants from native-born Americans; the policies and laws directed towards immigrants; and the creation of ethnic and national identities. The readings will present students with a broad overview of American immigration history, as well as some pertinent topics in recent historiography. We will read the works of historians, sociologists and political scientists.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 663  History of New York City

    Description:
    "The Big Apple." "Gotham". Whatever you choose to call it, New York City has played an outsized role in American history. This reading-intensive, discussion-based seminar will explore the history, from the time of the Dutch colonists to the politics of urban renewal in the post-World-War-Two years. Through a variety of readings by historians and journalists, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, capital and labor, culture, politics, and religion.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 664  Boston History

    Description:
    This reading-intensive seminar will provide a broad overview of Boston history. We will pay close attention to the issues of race, ethnicity, religion, and class in understanding the larger issues that have shaped modern-day Boston. We will also examine the physical development of the city over that time and the major political issues that have defined Boston.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 670  Archival Methods and Practices

    Description:
    This course reviews and instructs student sin fundamental archival practice, including acquiring, appraising, describing, preserving and processing collections. It examines access policies and services to organizations and researchers. The course also introduces students to archival tools in the digital age.   More Info

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  • HIST 671  Archival Internship

    Description:
    This course involves 120 hours of work at an archival institution, normally during either the spring or fall semester, under the supervision of a professional archivist, and involving a project that can be completed within those hours. The site of the internship must be approved by the Program Director. The student and the supervising archivist will agree to adhere to the guidelines and standards for internships. The student will meet regularly with the Program Director, and at the end of the semester will submit a project report.   More Info

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  • HIST 676  Archival Administration and Introduction to Archives

    Description:
    Introduces students to the goals and operations of archives. Engages problems encountered in creating, administering, and funding archives, ranging from engagement with records management to public outreach to security. Include visits to archives in Boston and its region.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 678  Transforming Archives in the Digital Age

    Description:
    This course will cover new strategies, techniques and skills and archives and archivists require to acquire and preserve databases, e-mail, and other digital formats, as well as digitized materials that were originally in other formats. It will also explain methods for managing digital records from accessing through their life-cycle. Finally, it examines multiple approaches to storage and access.   More Info

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  • HIST 681  Topics in European History

    Description:
    Examinations of important themes in European political, social, cultural, and intellectual history. Topics vary.   More Info

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  • HIST 682  Topics in American History

    Description:
    Examinations of important themes in American political, social, cultural, and intellectual history. Topics vary.   More Info

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  • HIST 685  Topics in Atlantic History

    Description:
    This course is an examination of important themes in the history of the Atlantic world between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. Such themes will involve economic, cultural, social, and/or political interactions between peoples and countries on both sides of the Atlantic.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 688  Oral History

    Description:
    The practice of oral history is an important counterpart to traditional archival research methods. This course examines what it means to be a practitioner of oral history. The course will explore in depth the contributions that oral history can make to the understanding of the past. Throughout the course we will think critically about the nature of narrative an memory and work extensively to develop interview skills. The course will also explore the design of an oral history archive.   More Info

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  • HIST 689  Capstone Project

    Description:
    A 30-page research paper on a topic selected by the student and approved by the graduate program director. The paper must include a curricular section discussing the methods and materials that would be used in teaching this topic or subject area on the secondary school level. The paper will be defended before a committee consisting of a faculty supervisor and two other readers.   More Info

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  • HIST 690  Thesis Preparation

    Description:
    This is a one-semester supervised individual course to help students develop a viable thesis topic. Subjects will vary according to the student's interest and will include extensive guided reading.   More Info

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  • HIST 691  Teaching History

    Description:
    Students in this course will analyze historical thinking and work to learn those skills that contribute to effective college teaching. The course is designed for students who will be Teaching Assistants and for those who hope to teach at the Community college or University level.   More Info

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  • HIST 692  Teaching the Advanced Placement History Course

    Description:
    Teaching the Advanced Placement History course addresses the teaching in the College Boards Advanced Placement program and explores the problems associated with teaching across the K-12 and higher education divide. It also will provide the student with a research opportunity in a subject that will address the problems associated with teaching a collegiate subject in a school setting.   More Info

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  • HIST 694  Teaching History to English Language Learners

    Description:
    This course is intended to provide teachers of English Language Learners with an understanding of the distinctive way in which historians approach the study of history, a sense of how the narratives of the past are derived and constructed, and skills to use this knowledge to enable them to teach the subject to English Language Learners.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 696  Independent Study

    Description:
    Advanced course of independent readings under the guidance and subject to the examination of the instructor. Areas and topics according to student need. May be taken only once.   More Info

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  • HIST 697  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

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  • HIST 698  Internship in Public History

    Description:
    In order to gain direct experience with the problems and applied solutions in the field, students in the Public History Track will conduct tan Internship of at least one semester in length in which they will be asked to participate in a project or activity with a public history group or institution. The students will be given close supervision by a UMB History Department faculty member and will be required to meet the same requirement as graduate students meet in laboratories. In other words, the three-credit internship will require 2.5 hours of work per week, per credit, or a total of 7.5 hours of intern work per week. In the process of the internship, students will learn from public history practitioners such as museum professionals, tour guides, re-enactors, documentary film makers as well as from scholars of history. These practitioners will guide students through the problems and solutions involved in planning and funding public history projects as well as the problems in selecting, conducting and oral and community history projects and interpreting and presenting historical information in various venues in order to engage and educate public audiences.   More Info

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  • HIST 699  Master of Arts Thesis

    Description:
    Under the supervision of the appointed advisor. All topics must be previously approved by the program's graduate committee. The thesis will be defended before a committee of three faculty members who will also judge its suitability as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master of arts degree.   More Info

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