Academics

Course Catalog

GRAD > HIST

History

  • HIST 600  Research and Methods

    Description:
    This introductory course in historical research methods is required for all tracks in the History MA program. The course will focus on archival research skills, analysis of primary sources, and the development of critical writing skills. Among the assignments, all students will complete a 20-25 page research paper in which students will utilize primary sources in order to develop an historical argument. Specific topics will vary from semester to semester based on the expertise and interests of the instructor.   More Info

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  • HIST 602L  Historical Sequence I: American Society and Political Culture: 1600-1865

    Description:
    The course follows the evolution of American society and political culture from the colonial period to the Civil War. The concept "political culture," as used here, embraces institutions, public behavior, and above all, attitudes-beliefs, values, expectations, fears-regarding the distribution and exercise of political power. Two momentous events, the wars for independence and union, are major course milestones at which the development of political culture is assessed from the perspective of different social groups, including leaders, artists, writers, women, workers, and slaves. A central theme is the interplay between regional divergences and national convergences. Thematic questions running through the course are: Did a common political culture emerge? Who was included, who excluded? Was American political culture distinctive? AMST 602L and HIST 602L are the same course.   More Info

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  • HIST 605  Introduction to Historiography

    Description:
    This introductory course in historiography is required for all tracks in the History MA. It is designated as a reading course in which students will explore critical theoretical approaches in history. The study of historiography involves both the study of the methodologies used by historians, as well as the study of the development of the discipline of history over time. Students will learn how a field of historical study is defined, study dominant historical approaches and themes over time, and understand how to position research within a larger historiographical debate. Specific topics will vary from semester to semester based on the expertise and interests of the instructor.   More Info

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  • HIST 610L  Greek and Roman Historians

    Description:
    Beginning with the "Father of History" Herodotus and ending with Ammianus Marcellinus, this course will consider all of the major Greek and Roman writers of historical accounts. Topics will include: variations of genre and the role of audience; the author's motivation, narrative style, and use of sources; the sociological impact of histories; and the differing traditions of Greek and Roman historiography. Requirements include extensive consideration of both the ancient texts and modern scholarship on each author and on the historiographical process. CLSICS 610L and HIST 610L are the same course.   More Info

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  • HIST 620  Introduction to Public History and Popular Memory

    Description:
    This course will introduce students to the historical origins of the public history field, the historiography and major paradigms in the field, and the debates that have emerged surrounding the public role of historians. Students will be required to engage in seminar discussions, evaluate two current public history artifacts (i.e. exhibitions, walking tours, oral history program, digital project, etc.), and complete a project proposal where students discuss the theoretical and practical aspects of public history work and locate themselves in the larger paradigms of the field. By the end of the course, students are expected to understand the following: the evolution of the public history field; historians' engagement with various publics, and more specifically historians' involvement in the public constructions of history; major theoretical constructs such as memory, heritage, community, commemoration; and current issues, trends, and theories that continue to change within the public history field.   More Info

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  • HIST 625  Interpreting History in Public Approaches to Public History Practice

    Description:
    This course gives students an overview of the history, best practices, and cultural debates that provide the context for museum and historic site interpretation in the United States. Students will learn how versions of the past are created, communicated and institutionalized as history at historic sites, museums, historic houses, landscapes, and the web. They will explore successful models of interpretation in public venues and examine dilemmas in community collaboration and interpretation for and with the public. Students examine the roles of evidence, history and politics in interpretation; venues, cultures and histories that shape interpretation; interpretive methods and practices in using historical evidence in public history venues; and issues and practices that challenge the practice of public history now and into the future. The course offers students several opportunities to engage in this exploration through readings, assignments, class discussion, guest speakers, case studies, visits to actual and virtual sites, written and oral assignments, and practicum experiences with a community partner.   More Info

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  • HIST 626  Introduction to Archives and Information Management

    Description:
    This seminar provides an introduction overview to managing archival resources, the essential principles of the profession, and the core work archivists do, including appraisal, acquisitions, preservation, arrangement, description, providing access, research services, and outreach. The course explores the history of manuscript collection in the United States; discusses current issues and new technologies int he field; explores trends in archival processing and access; and discusses theories that shape the nature of archival management. Students may gain some hands-on experience with manuscript processing, open source collection management software, and digital methodologies.   More Info

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  • HIST 627  Archival Methods and Practices

    Description:
    This course explores the fundamental principles of archival practice and methodology, focusing largely on basic preservation, arrangement, description and access standards. Issues, topics, and technologies explored include the development of descriptive standards for traditional materials and for special formats. The course may include some hands-on work: curating manuscripts, audiovisual materials, and/or digital collections; learning and applying preservation techniques; and creating a finding aid.   More Info

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  • HIST 630  Transforming Archives and History in the Digital Era

    Description:
    In a rapidly changing electronic age, archivists must learn to preserve and provide long-term access to materials and also learn to create, present, and archive history online. This seminar explores digitization as a means of preserving traditional archival materials; students may also create a digital archive and learn preservation techniques for various types of digital media (textual, image sound, moving images, and web sites); and examine the unique challenges posed by electronic records, including copyright issues, and digital asset management.   More Info

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  • HIST 632  Women's Health and Healing

    Description:
    This graduate seminar investigates the history of medicine for and by women spanning the 1600s-1900s in Europe and America. Course readings include primary and secondary sources that trace changing ideas about women's health and bodies, as well as women's roles as healers and patients. More specific topics include childbirth and motherhood, experiences of breast cancer, ideas about race, slavery, and women's bodies, the history of birth control, and women's roles in the reform of public health.   More Info

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  • HIST 635  Internship in Archives and Information Management

    Description:
    The internship provides students with an opportunity to acquire direct practical experience. Students enrolled in this course will complete 120 hours of work at an approved institution (either a traditional archive, special collections library, or museum, or a repository specializing in electronic records), under the supervision of a professional archivist or information manager. Enrolled students will complete an approved project and meet regularly with the Program Director, periodically submit written reports, and, at the end of the semester, submit a final project report and assessment.   More Info

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  • HIST 636  Weimar Germany

    Description:
    An examination of German life and culture under the Weimar Republic, chiefly through studies of diverse primary sources ranging from memoirs and public addresses to literature, the arts, and architecture. Each student investigates one aspect of Weimar history using the available primary source material (in translation) and delivers an oral presentation and a final major paper.   More Info

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  • HIST 638  World War I

    Description:
    This course analyzes the causes and development of World War I and its aftermath. The discussions will include the diplomatic origins of the conflict, the power relationships among the different powers, expansion of the Great War, the most important military operations, and the historiographical debate regarding the conflict. The aftermath of the war will also be examined, including the Paris Peace Conference, the complex developments that produced the postwar world, and the debate over their relationship to the outbreak of the next World War.   More Info

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  • HIST 639  World War II

    Description:
    This course examines the European origins and course of World War II, the most destructive conflict in history. Readings and discussions will emphasize the origins of that war, military developments, its impact on civilians, and the aftermath.   More Info

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  • HIST 640  The Science, Diplomacy, and Politics of the Atomic Bomb

    Description:
    The Atomic Bomb changed the history of the world bu had its beginnings int he laboratories of scientists who were trying to understand how the world works. In the process, they built a new weapon that revolutionized warfare and unlocked what promised to be a limitless form of energy. The class will examine how these events unfolded by doing readings on important themes and discussing the evolution and politics of the bomb. Four short papers on the major ideas emerging from the readings will be required.   More Info

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  • HIST 641  Socialism: The International History of a Revolutionary Idea

    Description:
    This course will discuss one of the most important movements in modern history. Readings and discussions will give students an idea of Socialist ideology and the different strains that emerged from it, including anarchism, revolutionary socialism, social democracy, and communism. They will consider the different interpretations that have produced conflict among adherents of different varieties of socialism and how they have affected the world.   More Info

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  • HIST 642  Fascism

    Description:
    This course examines the origins and development of Fascist ideology and practice, from rise from a local to a major international force, and its fall, in the twentieth century. Readings and discussions will present different interpretations of the Fascist phenomenon and whether its core style is being revived in the twenty-first.   More Info

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  • HIST 644  Topics on the History of the American Revolution

    Description:
    This seminar will focus upon a specific question, theme, or emphasis on the history of the American Revolution. It may engage a historiographic problem--Beard's economic interpretation of the Constitution; a thematic question--the economic or social consequences of the Revolution; or a single event--The Stamp Act Riots or the Boston Tea Party, as vehicles for a deeper understanding of the causes and consequences of American independence.   More Info

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  • HIST 655  Themes in American Indian History

    Description:
    Scholars have recently reframed American Indian History. The last two decades of publication have expanded from basic Native agency to exploring American Indians on their own terms and within their own historiographical framework. This graduate seminar examines the themes and literature emerging from the newest transformation of the field. Each week, we will read and discuss books and articles illustrating major themes and historical debates in this field. For your final project, you will craft a polished historiographical piece analyzing the important works on a topic of your choice within American Indian History.   More Info

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  • HIST 662  Immigration and Ethnicity

    Description:
    This graduate-level seminar will provide students with an in-depth look at the history of American immigration and ethnicity. The course will look at four basic themes: the diverse experiences of immigrants; the reaction to immigrants from native-born Americans; the policies and laws directed towards immigrants; and the creation of ethnic and national identities. The readings will present students with a broad overview of American immigration history, as well as some pertinent topics in recent historiography. We will read the works of historians, sociologists and political scientists.   More Info

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  • HIST 663  History of New York City

    Description:
    "The Big Apple." "Gotham". Whatever you choose to call it, New York City has played an outsized role in American history. This reading-intensive, discussion-based seminar will explore the history, from the time of the Dutch colonists to the politics of urban renewal in the post-World-War-Two years. Through a variety of readings by historians and journalists, we will examine issues of race and ethnicity, capital and labor, culture, politics, and religion.   More Info

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  • HIST 664  Boston History

    Description:
    This reading-intensive seminar will provide a broad overview of Boston history. We will pay close attention to the issues of race, ethnicity, religion, and class in understanding the larger issues that have shaped modern-day Boston. We will also examine the physical development of the city over that time and the major political issues that have defined Boston.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 681  Topics in European History

    Description:
    Examinations of important themes in European political, social, cultural, and intellectual history. Topics vary.   More Info

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  • HIST 682  Topics in American History

    Description:
    Examinations of important themes in American political, social, cultural, and intellectual history. Topics vary.   More Info

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  • HIST 685  Topics in Atlantic History

    Description:
    This course is an examination of important themes in the history of the Atlantic world between the sixteenth and nineteenth centuries. Such themes will involve economic, cultural, social, and/or political interactions between peoples and countries on both sides of the Atlantic.   More Info

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  • HIST 688  Oral History

    Description:
    The practice of oral history is an important counterpart to traditional archival research methods. This course examines what it means to be a practitioner of oral history. The course will explore in depth the contributions that oral history can make to the understanding of the past. Throughout the course we will think critically about the nature of narrative an memory and work extensively to develop interview skills. The course will also explore the design of an oral history archive.   More Info

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  • HIST 689  Capstone Project

    Description:
    This course is for students in the Archives and Public History Tracks who choose to take the Capstone route instead of Thesis. In this course, those students will complete a substantial Archives of Public History project. Students will choose their topics and complete their projects under the supervision of a faculty advisor.   More Info

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  • HIST 690  Thesis Preparation

    Description:
    This is a one-semester supervised individual course to help students develop a viable thesis topic. Subjects will vary according to the student's interest and will include extensive guided reading.   More Info

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  • HIST 691  Teaching History

    Description:
    Students in this course will analyze historical thinking and work to learn those skills that contribute to effective college teaching. The course is designed for students who will be Teaching Assistants and for those who hope to teach at the Community college or University level.   More Info

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  • HIST 692  Teaching the Advanced Placement History Course

    Description:
    Teaching the Advanced Placement History course addresses the teaching in the College Boards Advanced Placement program and explores the problems associated with teaching across the K-12 and higher education divide. It also will provide the student with a research opportunity in a subject that will address the problems associated with teaching a collegiate subject in a school setting.   More Info

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  • HIST 694  Teaching History to English Language Learners

    Description:
    This course is intended to provide teachers of English Language Learners with an understanding of the distinctive way in which historians approach the study of history, a sense of how the narratives of the past are derived and constructed, and skills to use this knowledge to enable them to teach the subject to English Language Learners.   More Info

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    • TBA
  • HIST 696  Independent Study

    Description:
    Advanced course of independent readings under the guidance and subject to the examination of the instructor. Areas and topics according to student need. May be taken only once.   More Info

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  • HIST 697  Special Topics

    Description:
    This course offers study of selected topics within this subject. Course content and credits vary according to topic and are announced prior to the registration period.   More Info

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  • HIST 698  Internship in Public History

    Description:
    In order to gain direct experience with the problems and applied solutions in the field, students in the Public History Track will conduct tan Internship of at least one semester in length in which they will be asked to participate in a project or activity with a public history group or institution. The students will be given close supervision by a UMB History Department faculty member and will be required to meet the same requirement as graduate students meet in laboratories. In other words, the three-credit internship will require 2.5 hours of work per week, per credit, or a total of 7.5 hours of intern work per week. In the process of the internship, students will learn from public history practitioners such as museum professionals, tour guides, re-enactors, documentary film makers as well as from scholars of history. These practitioners will guide students through the problems and solutions involved in planning and funding public history projects as well as the problems in selecting, conducting and oral and community history projects and interpreting and presenting historical information in various venues in order to engage and educate public audiences.   More Info

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  • HIST 699  Master of Arts Thesis

    Description:
    Under the supervision of the appointed advisor. All topics must be previously approved by the program's graduate committee. The thesis will be defended before a committee of three faculty members who will also judge its suitability as partial fulfillment of the requirements for the master of arts degree.   More Info

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