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Course Catalog

UGRD > BIOL

Biology

  • BIOL 100  Coastal Ecology

    Description:
    Investigations of the natural history and community dynamics of salt marshes, sea grass beds, mudflats, and beaches. Field and laboratory exercises on the adaptations and interactions of marine organisms are emphasized. Meets every weekday during two weeks of the summer at the university's field station on Nantucket.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • BIOL 101  The Basis of Life

    Description:
    The uniqueness of life within the physical universe. The matter and energy of life, the genetic code, molecular biology, and the origin and evolution of life. An overview for students in the humanities and social sciences of those features which distinguish living organisms from non-living things. No background in the natural sciences is required.   More Info

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  • BIOL 102  Evolutionary Biology

    Description:
    Designed for students in the social sciences and humanities. Those areas of genetics, ecology, and evolution that form a unified approach to the study of organisms and populations. No background in the natural sciences is required.   More Info

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  • BIOL 108  Introduction to Nutrition

    Description:
    Introduction to the elements of nutrition with emphasis on nutrition for humans; examination of food stuffs and nutritional quality, physiology of food utilization, food quality regulations, and the global ecology of food production. No background in the natural sciences is required.   More Info

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  • BIOL 111  General Biology I

    Description:
    An integrated course stressing the principles of biology. Life processes are examined primarily at the molecular and cellular levels. Intended for students majoring in biology or for non-majors who wish to take advanced biology courses.   More Info

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  • BIOL 112  General Biology II

    Description:
    An integrated course stressing the principles of biology. Life processes are examined primarily at the organismal and population levels. Intended for students majoring in biology or for non-majors who wish to take advanced biology courses.   More Info

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  • BIOL 187S  Gateway Seminar I

    Description:
    This Seminar Course is organized along a theme if inquiry-based learning for students and faculty. Each participant has a role in understanding topics that are prevalent in the scientific community along with developing new information that might form the basic science investments of the future. Students will be co-developers of this freshman seminar series that will be based primarily on inquiry-based science education. Desired outcomes will focus on students developing discovery skills, becoming self-driven learners, learning to work in groups and being successful at the university. This course will maximize students potential for success in the university and the scientific community. Grading will be based o n class participation (Wikis, class interactions), written papers, and inquiry-based examinations.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 188S  Gateway Seminar II

    Description:
    This Seminar Course is organized along a theme if inquiry-based learning for students and faculty. Each participant has a role in understanding topics that are prevalent in the scientific community along with developing new information that might form the basic science investments of the future. Students will be co-developers of this freshman seminar series that will be based primarily on inquiry-based science education. Desired outcomes will focus on students developing discovery skills, becoming self-driven learners, learning to work in groups and being successful at the university. This course will maximize students potential for success in the university and the scientific community. Grading will be based o n class participation (Wikis, class interactions), written papers, and inquiry-based examinations.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 207  Anatomy and Physiology I

    Description:
    A study of the human organism, correlating structure and physiological mechanisms. Emphasis on skin, the special senses, and the skeletal, articular, muscular, nervous, and endocrine systems. Required of nursing and human performance and fitness majors.   More Info

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  • BIOL 208  Anatomy and Physiology II

    Description:
    Continuation of BIOL 207. Emphasis on the digestive, circulatory, respiratory, excretory, and reproductive systems. Required of nursing and human performance and fitness majors.   More Info

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  • BIOL 209  Medical Microbiology

    Description:
    An introduction to viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa which may be pathogenic to humans and animals; and to immunology, epidemiology, and clinical microbiology. The laboratory introduces sterile techniques, maintenance of pure cultures, isolation, identification, and immunological methods.   More Info

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  • BIOL 210  Cell Biology

    Description:
    A study of structure and function of cells including physiological and biochemical processes of cells, membranes, subcellular organelles, and of specialized cells. Specific topics include synthesis and mode of action of biological macromolecules, flow of information and energy, mode of enzyme action, cell-to-cell communication, and membrane functions such as transport. Note: Students (non-biology majors) who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 212. No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 212.   More Info

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  • BIOL 212  Cell Biology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 210; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. Biology majors should take BIOL 210. No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 210.   More Info

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  • BIOL 252  Genetics

    Description:
    The basic principles of heredity, studied through an integrated presentation of molecular and classical (Mendelian) genetics. Topics include the nature of the hereditary material, structure of chromosomes, and patterns of inheritance. Note: Students (non-biology majors) who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 254. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 254.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 254  Genetics (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 252; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 252.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 290  Population Biology

    Description:
    This course examines evolution, and the growth of populations, developing principles and applying them to such issues as interaction among species, social behavior, presentation of genetic variation in domestic species, ecology of human pathogens, control of insect pests, and the organization of ecosystems. The course includes two field trips.   More Info

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  • BIOL 306  Marine & Coastal Ecological Research

    Description:
    Supervised research on the adaptations and interactions of organisms of the beaches, salt marshes, sand dunes, and embayments of Nantucket. Meets every weekday during two weeks of the summer at the University's field station on Nantucket.   More Info

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  • BIOL 313  Developmental Biology and Embryology

    Description:
    This course analyzes the development of multicellular animals and plants, by examining major developmental processes: growth, gene expression, cell interaction, morphogenesis, and pattern regulation. The description of this course is the same as BIOL 312; BIOL 313 has fewer lab hours. Students wishing to take this course with additional lab hours for more credits should enroll in BIOL 312. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 312.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 314  Developmental Biol

    Description:
    This course analyzes the development of multicellular animals and plants, by examining major developmental processes: growth, gene expression, cell interaction, morphogenesis, and pattern regulation. Lectures use experimental evidence to explore the commonality of mechanisms in differing organisms. Basic labs provide experience with materials and methods, and help clarify changing three-dimensional relationships. Additional labs investigate vertebrate embryology in greater detail. Note: Students wishing to take this course with fewer lab hours for fewer credits should enroll in BIOL 313. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 313.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 316  Neurobiology

    Description:
    Examination of the nervous system, beginning at the membrane and cellular level and then moving on to the organization of sensory and motor systems. Special topics include the biological basis of various neurological and psychiatric diseases. Note: Students who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 318. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 318.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 317  Endocrinology

    Description:
    The study of hormone physiology and biochemistry in the context of organismal regulation and coordination. Includes hormone chemistry, control and regulation of hormone production, and the cellular and biochemical nature of hormone action. Emphasis on mammalian systems and on laboratory and clinical investigations of the endocrine system. Note: Students who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 319. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 319.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 318  Neurobiology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 316; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 316.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 319  Endocrinology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 317; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 317.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 321  Plant Physiology

    Description:
    A study of plant function with emphasis on nutrition, translocation, metabolism, signal transduction and gene expression, photosynthesis and respiration, hormonal controls during vegetative and reproductive growth, and responses to environmental signals and stresses. Note: Students who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 323. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 323 or 212.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 323  Plant Physiology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 321; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 321.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 328  Plant Life

    Description:
    An advanced survey of plant diversity, the major groups, their organization and reproduction, the elements of taxonomy and economic botany of vascular plants, and the major issues of conservation biology. Note: Students who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 329. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 329.)   More Info

    Offered in:
  • BIOL 329  Plant Life (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 328; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 328.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 330  Biology of Fishes

    Description:
    The evolution, ecology, genetics, taxonomy, and structure of fish. Biological problems of general interest are emphasized, such as breeding systems, genetics of sex determination, evolution by means of chromosome duplication, environmental physiology, and migration.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 331  Biology of Marine Invertebrates

    Description:
    Essential background for those planning to concentrate in organismic biology, evolution, ecology, or applied environmental science. The course covers life histories, ecological roles, adaptations, morphologies, evolution, and classification of marine invertebrate animals. Laboratory includes field trips to local marine communities. Note: Students who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 333. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 333.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 332  Biology of Marine Invertebrates Laboratory

    Description:
    The lab covers life histories, ecological roles, adaptations, morphologies, evolution and classification of marine invertebrate animals. Laboratory includes field trips to local marine communities.   More Info

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  • BIOL 333  Biology of Marine Invertebrates (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 331; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 331.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 334  Microbiology

    Description:
    The study of viruses, bacteria, algae, fungi, and protozoa, to include their characterization, classification, and relationship to humans and the environment. Lecture topics include microbial biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, taxonomy, pathogenic bacteriology, food and industrial microbiology, and ecology. The laboratory emphasizes aseptic techniques to isolate, culture, observe, and identify bacteria.   More Info

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  • BIOL 335  Genomics: Microbes, Human Biome and Other Metagenomes

    Description:
    The life sciences have been transformed by enormous amounts of molecular sequence data from complete genomic sequences and entire microbial community sequences (metagenomes) hand-in-hand with the ability to make sense of this vast information using new computational advances and database capabilities. This course surveys the field of genomics using microorganisms as examples. Students receive an overview of bacterial and yeast genomes; and genome-wide approaches to fundamental problems in microbial physiology and disease. Specific topics include bacterial, yeast, and viral genome structure, genome evolution, genomic variation, and other issues in comparative and functional genomics. Metagenomics topics focus on the human microbiome, environmental communities, and global biogeochemical cycles in oceans and soils. The course is literature-based, with lectures and exercises giving students an introduction to topics.   More Info

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  • BIOL 336L  Ecosystems Ecology

    Description:
    This course will focus on the foundational principles of ecosystems ecology. We will focus on the flow of energy and materials through both the biosphere (plants, animals, and microbes) and the geosphere (soils, atmospheres, and oceans) and the role that humans are playing in altering these key fluxes. We will draw on examples from both terrestrial and marine systems to understand the underlying principles of ecosystem structure and function. BIOL 336L and EEOS 336L are the same course.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 337  Comparative Animal Physiology

    Description:
    Considers physiological principles and problems in a phylogenetic perspective. An integrated view of physiological solutions from the cellular to organismal level is used to discuss adaptations to environments and constraints on life history. Major topics to be considered include temperature responses, biological clocks, allometry, respiration, circulation, energetics, locomotion, and salt and water balance. Note: Students who do not wish to take the laboratory portion of this course should register for BIOL 339. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 339.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 338  Insect Life

    Description:
    This course considers physiological and other adaptations that account for the survival and success of insect life. The laboratory deals primarily with the diversity of insects. Brief consideration is also given to the relationship of insects to humans.   More Info

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  • BIOL 339  Comparative Animal Physiology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 337; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 337.)   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 340  Marine Mammal Biology

    Description:
    This upper-level course covers the biological ecology of marine mammals (Pinnipeds, Cetaceans, Sirenians), with emphasis on applied population ecology, and conservation issues. Topics include adaptations to marine environments, effects of human exploitation, case studies of population recovery, and multispecies interactions. Many topics make use of mathematical equations.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 341  Marine Mammal Biology Laboratory

    Description:
    This laboratory course is designed to accompany the Marine Mammal Biology Lecture course. Students get a practical, hands-on experience of the biology and conservation of marine mammals, including classification and functional anatomy, diet and foraging communication, life history, population genetics and dynamics, survey design, conservation, and management.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 342  Ecology

    Description:
    A course in population and community ecology. Topics include theory and case studies of population dynamics, competition, predation, niche concepts, life history strategies, behavioral interactions, energetics and productivity, community structure and organization, and biogeography.   More Info

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  • BIOL 343  Ecology Laboratory

    Description:
    Field trips to local terrestrial and marine communities, laboratory studies of population dynamics and interactions between species, and analytical approaches to ecological data. Some field trips may be scheduled on Saturdays. (Course offered in even-numbered years, fall term.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 348  Animal Behavior

    Description:
    The course deals with some topics in the physiology and development of behavior and more extensively with social organization, communication, and ecological aspects of behavior. Emphasis on the function and evolution of behavior.   More Info

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  • BIOL 352  Evolution

    Description:
    Evolution as the unifying concept of biology. Topics include population genetics, adaptive strategies, sex and breeding systems, speciation and population differentiation, fossil histories, evolution of man.   More Info

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  • BIOL 353  Evolution Laboratory

    Description:
    Laboratory investigations of evolutionary processes, including simulations of population genetics, biometric analyses of adaptive morphological features in natural populations, experiments on mimicry, field trips to systematic museum collections and local natural habitats, and phylogenetic analysis of land snails. Concepts of experimental design and statistical analysis are emphasized. (Course offered in the spring semester of even-numbered years.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 359  Caribbean Tropical Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology

    Description:
    This field-based course, conducted in Puerto Rico, will introduce students to the basics of tropical ecology, evolution, and conservation biology through a mixture of lectures, field excursions, and independent projects.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • BIOL 360  Bioinformatics

    Description:
    This course will provide a fundamental overview of bioinformatics, which is the collection, organization, and analysis of biological information. Topics include data searches and sequence alignments, substitution patterns, phylogenetics, genomics, protein and RNA structure prediction, and proteomics. Designed as a required course for biotechnology track students and other students interested in biotechnology careers of graduate study in biological sciences   More Info

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  • BIOL 361  Bioinformatics Laboratory

    Description:
    This laboratory course, to be taken concurrently with the Bioinformatics lecture, BIOL 360/560, provides a hands-on, inquiry-based, laboratory experience for undergraduate science majors. The laboratory has four major goals: 1) Reinforce and extend the theoretical concepts from the lecture; 2) Connect biological concepts with practical bioinformatics tools and databases; 3) Expose students to computational concepts far more powerful than point-and-click web-based bioinformatics tools; 4) Provide important skills that are widely used in real-world biological and biomedical research. Each week's lab focuses on a particular topic that is closely related to the lecture. After a brief overview by the laboratory instructor, students will run computational bioinformatics experiments and collect the results. After the labs, students will write short lab reports.   More Info

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  • BIOL 365  Microbial Genomics Laboratory

    Description:
    This laboratory course, to be taken concurrently with BIOL 335, Genomics, provides a hands-on, inquiry-based, laboratory experience for undergraduate science majors. A bacterial model, Enterococcus, will be used to explore the diversity of the bacterium and some of its genes; and to test hypotheses about disease virulence and horizontal gene transfer in bacteria. Students will isolate metagenomic DNA and bacteria from the environment and learn basic microbiological methods (bacterial culture, aseptic technique, gram staining) and molecular biology methods (DNA purification/quantitation, PCR, gel electrophoresis, DNA sequencing). In the final portion of the course, students will use bioinformatics tools to analyze their data and submit a final research paper.   More Info

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  • BIOL 370  Molecular Biology

    Description:
    The molecular biology and biochemistry of gene expression in procaryotes and eucaryotes. Topics include DNA structure/physical biochemistry, recombinant DNA technology, techniques in research, DNA synthesis, RNA synthesis, protein synthesis, operons, chromatin structure and gene regulation, oncogenes, hormones and growth factors and signal transduction, transposons, mutagenesis and repair, flowering, photosynthesis, development, circadian rhythms, etc. Laboratories emphasize basic research techniques. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 372.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 372  Molecular Biology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 370; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 370.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 378  Introduction to Immunology

    Description:
    An introduction to the principles of immunology including definition of antigens and antibodies, specificity of the immune response, immunoglobin structure, the genetics of immunoglobin synthesis, cellular cooperation in the immune response, mechanism of inflammation, transplantation, diseases associated with responsiveness of the immune system. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 380.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 380  Introduction to Immunology (Lecture)

    Description:
    The description of this course is the same as BIOL 378; this course consists of lecture sections only; there is no laboratory. (No student may take this course after successful completion of BIOL 378.)   More Info

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  • BIOL 381  Special Topics

    Description:
    Detailed study of a specialized field of biology. Several topics may be offered each semester.   More Info

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  • BIOL 382  Special Topics Laboratory

    Description:
    In depth, hands-on laboratory experiences in a specialized field of biology. Several topics may be offered each semester.   More Info

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  • BIOL 384L  Game Theory, Evolution and Ecology

    Description:
    Fundamental concepts of evolutionary game theory and their application in biology. Topics include: the strategy and payoff matrix, the game tree, strategic and extensive form games, symmetric games, Nash equilibria. Evolutionary game theory concepts are discussed for two-strategy games (Prisoner's Dilemma, Hawk-Dove) and three-strategy games (Rock-Scissors-Paper). Biological examples are studied, such as blood sharing in vampire bats, competition in bacteria, or the evolution of altruistic punishment. BIOL 384L and MATH 384L are the same course.   More Info

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  • BIOL 395  Biotechnology

    Description:
    This course is designed to introduce students to methodologies and approaches in the biotechnology industry. The course focuses on the scientific principles and the applications of microbiology, cell biology, immunology, and molecular biology in the medical, pharmaceutical, chemical, and agricultural industries.   More Info

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  • BIOL 444  Cooperative Education

    Description:
    A work placement in an off-campus biological laboratory or field setting where a student carries out an approved project comparable in depth and scope to an advanced undergraduate biology course. The maximum amount of credits given is six, which can all be taken in one semester or apportioned into two semesters of three credits each. The department appoints one or more faculty to serve as co-sponsors. All placements are for six months. Full-time: six credits. Half-time: three credits.   More Info

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  • BIOL 478  Independent Study I

    Description:
    An opportunity for qualified, advanced students to work on a specialized topic or research project in biology under the guidance of a faculty advisor. The course is normally taken for 3 credits per semester. Enrollment may be for one semester, but students are strongly urged to enroll for a full year. This course can be taken in the summer. BIOL 478 and 479 do not count toward biology major requirements. Laboratory and field work.   More Info

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  • BIOL 479  Independent Study II

    Description:
    Study of a particular area of this subject under the supervision of a faculty member. Students wishing to register must do so through the department.   More Info

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