Academics

Course Catalog

UGRD > INTR-D

Interdisciplinary Studies

  • INTR-D 100G  Special Topics First Year Seminar

    Description:
    First Year Seminars provide students with an opportunity to develop their skills in careful reading, clear writing, critical thinking, information technology, oral presentation, academic self-assessment, and teamwork in an interactive classroom setting. They are a graduation for students who matriculate with fewer than 30 credits. In Special Topics First Year Seminars, instructors pilot new themes within this established General Education format.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • INTR-D 107  Water Resources Planning and Management

    Description:
    This course is a comprehensive introduction to the economics and ecology of water supply and water pollution control. Topics include watershed management, groundwater and wetlands protection, wastewater treatment and coastal zone management. The inherent difficulty in applying static laws and regulations to a dynamic natural resource such as water is a recurring theme in the course. It is strongly recommended for students interested in environmental management.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 108  Introduction to Marine Mammals

    Description:
    This course explores the biology and natural history of marine mammals in the North Atlantic, including whales, dolphins and seals. Topics include evolution, anatomy, behavior, field identification, the history of whaling, and contemporary whaling issues. Demonstration laboratory work focuses on a small marine mammal. One Saturday field trip on Massachusetts Bay is required.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 110  Set SAIL for Success Course Part I

    Description:
    The CNHS transition course, part one, is designed to assist with the high school to college transition at UMass Boston and the College of Nursing and Health Science (CNHS) community, and to position students for academic success. This course will address the social (S) and academic (A) aspects associated with transitioning to college.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 111  Sail Success Course Part II

    Description:
    The CNHS transition course, part two, focuses on professional development and transferable skills useful for aspiring healthcare professionals. This course will address interprofessional (I) and leadership (L) development.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 120  CSM Freshman Transition Seminar

    Description:
    The Freshman Transition Seminar is a one-credit, pass/fail course intended to assist new freshmen in the CSM Freshman Interest Group (FIG) program effectively transition into the college environment. Topics to be covered will include university resources and tools, academic planning, short- and long-term goal development, career exploration, and critical university skills.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 121  CSM Freshman Transition Seminar II

    Description:
    Part II of the CSM Freshman Transition Seminar is the second half of a year-long course designed to assist first-year students with their transition to the UMass Boston community and position them for academic success. The second half of the course will focus on effective group work and communication, creating attainable long term goals, academic citizenship, and preparing students to take ownership of their academic career. Through class activities, assignments, workshops and discussion, students will learn what it means to work effectively as a group, communicate with one another and faculty members in a productive manner, and internalize the meaning of academic citizenship and their roles within CSM, UMass Boston, and the greater science community.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 125  Science for Humane Survival I

    Description:
    This course deals with the role of science in our society. It develops the perspective that scientific problems and controversies cannot be divorced from their political, economic, and social implications. After some introductory discussion of scientific methodology, validation of scientific theories, and questions concerning the objectivity of science, the class turns to some critical global problems. These include problems centering on population, natural resources, food production, environmental pollution, and energy. No scientific background is assumed, but enough science is presented in the course to permit meaningful discussion. This course has no prerequisites.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • INTR-D 126  Science for Humane Survival II

    Description:
    This course deals with the role of science in our society and focuses on local problems. Among the topics discussed are food and nutrition, health care, scientific management, and several aspects of biological determination including social Darwinism, DNA screening, IQ, sex roles, sociobiology, and cloning. No scientific background is assumed, but enough science is presented in the course to permit meaningful discussion. This course has no prerequisites.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • INTR-D 170  UTeach Step 1: Inquiry Approaches to Teaching

    Description:
    Step 1 gives students the opportunity to explore teaching a career. Students will be introduced to the theory and practice behind excellent inquiry-based science and mathematics instruction, guides them through the process of designing and preparing to teach lessons in local, high-need elementary classrooms and to obtain firsthand experience in planning and implementing quality inquiry science and mathematics lessons.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • INTR-D 175  UTeach Step 2: Inquiry-Based Lesson Design

    Description:
    In Step 2, students continue developing the lesson planning skills they learned in Step 1, as they become familiar with exemplary middle school mathematics and science curricula. After observing a lesson being taught in a local school district classroom, students work alone or in pairs to plan and teach three inquiry-based lessons to sixth-, seventh-, or eighth- graders.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • INTR-D 187S  Science Gateway Seminar I

    Description:
    This Freshman Seminar Course, Intr-D 187S/188S), is organized along a theme of inquiry-based learning for students and faculty. Each participant has a role in understanding topics that are prevalent in the scientific community along with developing new information that might form the basic science investments of the future. This is a two-semester sequence, two credits each semester. Successful completion of the sequence will fulfill students First-Year Seminar requirement. Course content will vary with instructor, but will focus on discussion of topics with broad societal impact, and will have important scientific underpinnings, with a particular focus on science topics. Using this approach, students will become increasingly familiar with and experienced in scientific discourse, the scientific method, and important new scientific findings. Desired outcomes will focus on student developing discovery skills, =becoming self-driven learners, learning to work in groups and being successful at the university. This course will maximize students potential for success in the university and the scientific community. There will be two major writing assignments with feedback on all submitted work. Grading will be based on class participation (Wikis, class interactions), written papers, and an inquiry-based examination.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 188S  Science Gateway Seminar II

    Description:
    This Freshman Seminar Course, Intr-D 187S/188S), is organized along a theme of inquiry-based learning for students and faculty. Each participant has a role in understanding topics that are prevalent in the scientific community along with developing new information that might form the basic science investments of the future. This is a two-semester sequence, two credits each semester. Successful completion of the sequence will fulfill students First-Year Seminar requirement. Course content will vary with instructor, but will focus on discussion of topics with broad societal impact, and will have important scientific underpinnings, with a particular focus on science topics. Using this approach, students will become increasingly familiar with and experienced in scientific discourse, the scientific method, and important new scientific findings. Desired outcomes will focus on student developing discovery skills, =becoming self-driven learners, learning to work in groups and being successful at the university. This course will maximize students potential for success in the university and the scientific community. There will be two major writing assignments with feedback on all submitted work. Grading will be based on class participation (Wikis, class interactions), written papers, and an inquiry-based examination.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 200G  Special Topics Intermediate Seminar

    Description:
    Intermediate Seminars provide students with an opportunity to develop their careful reading, clear writing, and critical thinking skills in an interactive classroom setting; and are a graduation requirement for students who matriculate with fewer than 90 credits. In Special Topics Intermediate Seminars, instructors pilot new disciplinary themes within this established General Education format.   More Info

    Offered in:
  • INTR-D 201  Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies

    Description:
    Interdisciplinary thinking is defined as having basic knowledge about each potently relevant discipline so that you can understand its perspective and access, translate, think critically about, and use its insights. The goal of this course is to prepare students to become interdisciplinary thinkers and problem solvers. By the end of this course, students will be able to explain why a knowledge society needs both disciplinary specialization and interdisciplinary breadth, understand the differences between disciplinary, multidisciplinary, interdisciplinary, and transdisciplinary, identify the cognitive capabilities and values fostered by interdisciplinary studies, explain the rise of the modern disciplines and how they have come to enjoy near-monopoly status in learning and research, identify the defining elements of a discipline and how this information is used in interdisciplinary works, identify and explain the assumptions of interdisciplinary study, understand how and why interdisciplinarians interrogate disciplinary perspectives, identify and develop attitudes that are conductive to interdisciplinary critical thinking, understand the meaning of interdisciplinary integration, compare disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches to research, identify disciplines that are relevant to the problem of concern, and apply strategies to analyze disciplinary insights and expose their sources of conflict.   More Info

    Offered in:
    • TBA
  • INTR-D 480  Special Topics

    Description:
    Variable credit Special Topics course intended for one-time only course trials and similar offerings.   More Info

    Offered in: