UMass Boston

Mayra Cadorin Vidal

Department:
Biology
Title:
Assistant Professor
Location:
ISC, Floor 05
Phone:
617.287.6619

Biography

I received my Bachelor’s degree from the University of Campinas (Unicamp, Brazil) in Biological Science, with a focus in environmental biology. After obtaining my BS, I started my master’s research at the same University. I investigated how a new species of fly larva that eats ants affected the mutualism between plants and ants.

Area of Expertise

Evolutionary Ecology of Species Interactions, Community Ecology, Mutualism, Herbivory, Coevolution, Global Change

Degrees

PhD, University of Denver, 2018 (Biology, Ecology, and Evolution)

MSc, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 2013 (Ecology)

BSc, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 2010 (Biological Sciences)

Professional Publications & Contributions

Additional Information

Background

After my master’s, I moved to Colorado to pursue my PhD at the University of Denver. There, I studied how the community composition and selective pressures from plants and natural enemies can influence the diet of a generalist insect herbivore. Finally, for my post-doctoral research at Syracuse University, I used a synthetic yeast mutualism to understand how species richness and coevolution can help mutualistic communities persist under pressure from exploiters.  

Courses Taught

  • Biol 637 – Climate Change Biology

Research Interests

Interspecific interactions have a major influence on the ecology and evolution of organisms. My research is centered on understanding how species interactions change spatially and temporally and how these changes can shape community structure and the evolution of interacting species. I integrate population and community ecology, molecular ecology, genetics, evolution, entomology, and microbiology to accomplish my research goals.

Professional Affiliations

  • Society for the Study of Evolution
  • Entomological Society of America
  • Ecological Society of America
  • Society for Advancement of Chicanos/Hispanics and Native Americans in Science.
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